Zoe's Tale (Old Man's War Book 4) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Zoe's Tale has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library books. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Zoe's Tale Paperback – 5 Jun 2009


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£3.77 £0.01
£7.19 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Zoe's Tale + The Ghost Brigades + Old Man's War
Price For All Three: £21.87

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Tor (5 Jun. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 033050603X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330506038
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 2 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 137,345 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

John Scalzi won the 2006 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and his debut novel Old Man's War was a finalist for the Hugo Award. His other novels include The Ghost Brigades, The Last Colony, and The Android's Dream. He lives in southern Ohio with his wife and daughter.


Product Description

Review

'A refreshing addition to the science-fiction genre in the new millennium.'
-- SciFiNow

About the Author

JOHN SCALZI won the 2006 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and his debut novel Old Man’s War was a finalist for the Hugo Award. His other novels include The Ghost Brigades, The Last Colony, and The Android’s Dream. He lives in southern Ohio with his wife and daughter.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Shepherd on 16 Feb. 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is the fourth book set in the Old Man's War universe, but it's not a continuation of the story arcs he established in the first three, but rather a retelling of the events of the third book, The Last Colony, but told this time from a very different perspective, that of sixteen year old Zoe Boutin-Perry, daughter of a traitor, the object of a major treaty between the Colonial Union and the Obin, and adopted by John and Jane Perry.

Now doing something like this is fraught with peril, as readers of the earlier books will certainly know how everything ends, and will therefore have little sense of suspense throughout this work. It is even more perilous for a middle-aged man to attempt to find the correct `voice' for a teenaged female, one that rings true and will appeal to younger readers, and still engage readers of much greater ages. I'm happy to say that Mr. Scalzi quite deftly succeeded very, very well with both the characterization and being able to still hold at least this reader glued to the pages, even without the suspense.

Zoe herself is a full-bodied person, one you'd definitely like to meet, someone you come to care about a great deal over the course of this work. She's not perfect, she makes mistakes, occasionally her sarcasm and biting comments might make you grimace, and there is an element of unthinking `me-ness' to her, an attitude that she's unique. But in this case, she really is unique - not many girls can say that they are the goddess-object of an entire alien race. But besides her, several of her close friends also come alive as real people, something that's a little rare in first-person perspective works. Gretchen, Magdy, and Enzo are very much real people, and even better, real teenagers.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Welsby on 7 Oct. 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was reviewed in the latest issue of SFX magazine, and it sounded so interesting that I immediately bought the book. I'm really glad I did - I absolutely loved it. It's the best new book I've read in quite a while.

It's actually the fourth book in a series, but since it's based around a new character, I didn't have the slightest problem understanding it (though I do now intend to track down the earlier novels, and possibly even more of the author's work). Apparently it retells the events of "The Last Colony" from another character's perspective, which is a bit of a weird idea I suppose but presumably there's a lot going on that the main characters in each of those novels don't know about. Zoe's an engaging main character; sarcastic, intelligent, flawed but likeable, and surprisingly convincing as a teenage girl despite being written by a 38-year-old man.

The first thing that drew me to the novel was Zoe's status as icon to an entire race, the Obin. Essentially, her biological father gave the species consciousness, and after his death they kind of revered her, and also studied her as a way of teaching themselves how to live. On the one hand, she has a hell of a lot of power over them; on the other hand, she lacks freedom as almost everything she says or does is recorded and transmitted to the entire species. What I liked about it is that the Obin are not pushovers or timid beings reaching out for instruction; in fact, they're rather feared by most species for being deadly warriors. Watching Zoe's interaction with her two Obin bodyguards, Hickory and Dickory (who she named as a child after the nursery rhyme, a fact she feels somewhat embarrassed about) is the highlight of the novel for me.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 Jun. 2009
Format: Paperback
As a huge fan of Scalzi since Old Mans War, I really do have to get these books in the series as soon as they land. So when the latest offering landed I was interested to see how this latest hero of the future would fit into the Hienlinesque universe to which Scalzi writes.

What appears is a character of great heart and warmth and whilst she won't be to everyones cup of tea, the tale wouldn't work if it wasn't for the sheer likability as well as full roundedness of her. She's a breath of fresh air in the Sci-Fi genre and hopefully a character that will have many other adventures so that we can get to see more of her. Add to that fully rounded supporting characterisation along the wonderful world building and the only thing that you do know is that no matter what happens you're in for a real roller-coaster ride as the characters within try to find a way to cope with the changing needs of them not only socially but emotionally as well as communally. Great offering to the reader and make Scalzi a must own for all Sci-Fi fans.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steve on 20 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It was a pleasant enough read, if you had time to while away, but not very inspiring. Not what you would call a page turner. Mainly because, having read the original account of Roanoke, we all knew what was going to happen. It therefore seemed more like a slightly silly, gossipy girlie witness statement of events rather than a story in its own right.
If we are going to do this again, let's get Hickory's version of events. The interpretation might be a little more stretching than this.
By the authors own admission, it was a convenience to tie up a few loose ends, but I think I would have been happier with a one page list of 'tied off loose ends' sent to each Kindle reader who had bought Last Colony.
Read it, set complete. Done.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback