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Youth Culture in Modern Britain, c.1920-c.1970: From Ivory Tower to Global Movement - A New History [Hardcover]

David Fowler Dr
2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
RRP: £70.00
Price: £69.25 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

1 Oct 2008
This book traces the history of youth culture from its origins among the student communities of inter-war Britain to the more familiar world of youth communities and pop culture. Grounded in extensive original research, it explores the individuals, institutions and ideas that have shaped youth culture over much of the twentieth century.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (1 Oct 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0333599217
  • ISBN-13: 978-0333599211
  • Product Dimensions: 22 x 14 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,025,521 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

'David Fowler's new book is one of the most illuminating books on twentieth-century youth culture I have ever read. From the youth cults of the Edwardian era to the Mods of the Sixties, he looks behind the stereotypes and has unearthed some fascinating material. Based on years of archival research and written with an admirable eye for detail and perspective, this is bound to become essential reading for anyone interested in the social and cultural history of the last century.' - Dominic Sandbrook, University of Oxford, UK
 
'An ideal text for students: always clear and accessible, with a good eye for detailed examples that are amusing and memorable, even gripping in their opening up of the issues.' - Alastair Reid, Girton College, Cambridge, UK
 
'David Fowler offers us an iconoclastic account of the history of youth culture, enlivened by telling examples (the 1960s civil servant earnestly reading Herbert Marcuse's One-Dimensional Man) and challenging arguments which force us to re-examine our comfortable assumptions.' - John Street, University of East Anglia, UK
 
'Fowler has drilled some fascinating bore-holes into the history of 20th-century British youth, and the breadth and variety of examples discussed are a welcome and indeed important antidote to the historic tendency to focus on the post-1950s period.' - Reviews in History

Book Description

An approachable history of youth culture in the twentieth century, from its origins among the student communities of inter-war Britain to the more familiar world of youth communities and pop culture

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Annoying 15 Nov 2011
Format:Paperback
Anyone that can write 'whether the Beatles had a major influence on British youth culture during the 60s is questionable', obviously trying to be shocking, but quite frankly annoying in that 'The Sun says' mentality, best to leave well alone and avoid such simplistic theories, F for Fail
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars YOUTH CULTURE 5 Dec 2009
Format:Paperback
WHERE DO I BEGIN TO SHOW HOW DISAPPOINTED I WAS WITH THIS BOOK.

LET ME PUT EVERYTHING IN CONTEXT. I WAS ONE OF THOSE 10-14 YEAR OLDS WHO WORSHIPED THE BEATLES IN 1963 WHEN I WAS 10. I SAW BOTH A HARD DAYS NIGHT AND HELP AT OUR LOCAL CINEMA. THE SCREAMING COULD BE HEARD FOR MILES. DAVID FOWLER SAYS THAT THE BEATLES WERE NOT IMPORTANT IN YOUTH CULTURE. BEFORE 1966 YOUNG PEOPLE BOUGHT SINGLE RECORDS. AFTER ST. PEPPERS WE BOUGHT ALBUMS AND WHOLE ALBUMS WERE SEEN AS WORKS OF ART. THIS PAVED THE WAY FOR PINK FLOYD AND GENESIS.

MODS AND ROCKERS. DAVID FOWLER SAYS THAT THE MODS WHO CAME DOWN TO BRIGHTON (WHERE I LIVE) ATTACKED BEATNICKS NOT ROCKERS. DID HE CONSULT BRIGHTON LOCAL HISTORY CENTRE OR THE LIBRARY OF THE EVENING ARGUS (OUR LOCAL PAPER - WHERE MY FRIEND IS THE LIBRARIAN). I HAVE A PICTURE OF MYSELF ON BRIGHTON BEACH THAT YEAR AND I CAN TELL YOU THE MODS FOUGHT THE ROCKERS. IF YOU LOOK ON YOUTUBE YOU CAN SEE THE FOOTAGE. DAVID FOWLER DOES NOT EXPLORE ROCKERS AT ALL. MY FATHER WAS A TON UP BOY. HE RGULARLY VISITED THE ACE CAFE. THIS IS A WHOLE YOUTH CULTURE NOT EVEN MENTIONED IN THE BOOK.

FINALY HE DOES NOT MENTION THE EFFECT OF THE LOWERING OF THE DRINKING AGE ON YOUTH CULTURE. YOUTH COULD GO TO PUBS NOT COFE BARS OR CAFES. HE DOES NOT MENTION THE EFFECT OF THE PILL ON YOUTH CULTURE.

DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK.
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4 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Dr. Fowler has taken some harsh public criticism for his ideas, but a careful read through and analysis of his ideas expose the some interesting and provocative insights.
Were the Beatles and the Stones capitalists? You'll have to agree they auger in a new comodification of popular 'youth culture' and that their appeal to the generation to 'drop out' was to a class of youth who already had an 'in' with University education.
As usual it was up to the youth at the gates of both the urban and the establishment centres to nail the real colours to the mast.

A recovery of Rolf Gardiner is long past due. His mission to unite youth and present diversity in cultures across the class divides is presented here free of the ad hominem smears that have beset his image in other accounts. True Idealism isn't a fashion statement.

An excellent read.
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