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Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots (U.S. Version)
 
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Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots (U.S. Version)

13 May 2002 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 4.89 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:16
30
2
4:59
30
3
4:47
30
4
2:57
30
5
6:18
30
6
4:34
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4:43
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4:20
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3:33
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3:53
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11
3:09


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 13 May 2002
  • Release Date: 13 May 2002
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 2002 Warner Bros. Records Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:29
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001F2TH6U
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 9,347 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Chris G. on 19 Feb 2007
Format: Audio CD
After The Flaming Lips' exhilarating and resoundingly seminal 1999 release, 'The Soft Bulletin', I doubted whether they would ever reach such heady heights again. However, this album vanquished all those lingering doubts into oblivion!

Contrary to the misguided assertions offered by certain critics, this isn't simply a rehash of the highly successful 'Soft Bulletin' formula. Here, The Lips experiment more intently with synthesisers and drum machines. These help foster a staggering electronic soundscape, which evokes a mesmerising futuristic resonance. The music is as heartfelt and affecting as ever, with subjects such as loss, death and helplessness explored, but delightfully injected with the Lips' typical idiosyncrasies. The whole pink robots concept is utterly barmy, and a perfect example of the band's endearing ability to imbue ostensibly solemn subject matters with optimism and jocularity - whilst augmenting the music, not detracting from it.

To be honest, I could spend literally days waxing lyrical over the merits of each song on the album, but I'm sure my self-gratifying grandiloquence will probably send most readers into a coma, so, instead, I shall tender an uncomplicated précis: 'Yoshimi' is a work of genius. Please buy it immediately for a considerable dose of life-enhancement.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Seamus Connor on 22 May 2004
Format: Audio CD
In the tradition of popular music, concept albums are generally poor and unsatisfying. Dire, even, with the exception of that rare few - Van Morrisons seminal 'Astral Weeks', David Bowies loosely connected glam rock fest 'Ziggy star dust' and Mike Skinner's 'A grand don't come for free' are a few gems in a mine of mud and rubbish. It was with a certain degree of trepidation then that I approached a concept album about a girl battling an army of pink robots from a band who I'd never heard a lot about before, and despite critical acclaim, upon first listen I was dissappointed.
The second listen was the same. And the third. But gradually the psychedelic, digital, orchestral indie-rock on display began to seep into my psyche and dig away at me, until the album had me hooked and stayed on constant rotation in my cd player for a number of weeks. Now I know that psychedelic, digital and orchestral indie-rock all sound contradictory, and they are. But 'Yoshimi battles...' blends the various styles and influences seamlessly into what initially may appear random and scattered arrangement, but will progressively unravel until it all makes perfect sense, much in the fashion of Captain Beefheart's classic 'Trout mask replica'.
The album opens to a harsh electronic voice reverberating before breaking into a summery introspective tune which initially sounds reminiscent of 'Father and son' before finding it's own shape. One more robot / sympathy 3000-21 is blessed with Coyne's soft centred vocals which bring a ludicrous concept to have some emotional effect as he sings 'one more robot wants to be something more than a machine' to a pacy drum snare and electronic sounds.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Jun 2003
Format: Audio CD
ere are, unfortunately, not many albums like "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots." I enjoyed "Soft Bulletin" when I found it at a store last year, but what really dragged me in was the peculiar title of "Yoshimi." It's a fun, sweet, sad, immensely fulfilling album.
The songs tend to have a slightly futuristic feel; first off is the catchy "Fight Test" ("I don't know where the sunbeams end/and the starlight begins/it's all a mystery"), the haunting "One More Robot/Sympathy 3000-21" about a robot developing emotions (don't cringe -- it's done wonderfully), the poignant time-travel song "All We Have is Now," the somewhat more forgettable "It's Summertime (Throbbing Orange Pallbearers" and "Ego Tripping at the Gates of Hell," and the fantastic, almost pleading "Are You a Hypnotist?".
But my favorite tracks may be "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots"; part one is a delightfully cheesy description of a karate girl who is battling the evil robots. ("Oh Yoshimi/they don't believe me/but you won't let/ those robots eat me!") The second part is a funny instrumental, the actual conflict itself, punctuated by Yoshimi's bloodcurdling shrieks and the sound of those destructive pink robots.
If you can't handle music that stretches the imagination, then this isn't your album. Some songs ("Do You Realize?") would fit easily into a different album. But many of them ("All We Have is Now," "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots Pts. 1 and 2," "One More Robot/Sympathy 300-21") have that slightly fantastical, science-fictiony feel. The music is fast and deftly-performed, with the surreal notes that the lyrics demand. The overall effect is fun, catchy, sweet and sometimes quie funny.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Neil on 18 May 2007
Format: Audio CD
It looks like the other reviewers have done a good job of giving this album the respect it deserves. I doubt I will be as succinct and lucid as some of them, but I felt I just had to add my tribute.

I have a long history with this record. It started back in 2002 when I went to Amsterdam with some friends and took this record with me. The whole group of us just fell in love with it instantly, and would happily sing along in our mashed up states. These songs are so beautiful that some of them make me physically ache when I listen to them - "In the Morning of the Magicians" particularly.

"Do You Realise" was partially responsible for me getting together with my girlfriend. It's now "our song". I dount many couples have a "song" as cool as ours.

Not long after my girlfriend and I got together, we ate some magic mushrooms and had a bad trip. I had a particularly bad one as I'd taken 6 and a half times more than the recommended dose. While flailing around in the depths of despair and insanity I was listening mostly to the Screaming Trees' "Dust", which I used to like; but perhaps not surprisingly I haven't listened to since. Anyway, as the effects of the mushrooms lessened, and I started to realise that I wasn't dead or insane, I put this album on. Not only did everything get better, with the room starting to glow reassuringly, but Wayne Coyne's lyrics seemed to explain to me everything that I'd been going through, and everything I was then experiencing. It was a beautiful moment, and it helped to make the whole experience both the most terrifying experience of my entire life, and the most enlightening and worthwhile.

Perhaps that sounds sad to you, but I assure you that I feel enriched because of it, and wouldn't change a thing.
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