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Year's Best SF 7 (Year's Best SF (Science Fiction))
 
 

Year's Best SF 7 (Year's Best SF (Science Fiction)) [Kindle Edition]

David G. Hartwell , Kathryn Cramer
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

Once again, the year's finest flights of speculative imagination are gathered in one extraordinary volume, compiled by acclaimed editor and anthologist David G. Hartwell. From some of the most renowned visionaries of contemporary SF -- as well as new writers who are already making an indelible mark -- comes an all-new compendium of unparalleled tales of the possible that will enthrall, astonish, terrify, and elate. Stories of strange worlds and mind-boggling futures, of awesome discoveries and apocalyptic disasters, of universes light years distant and deep within the human consciousness, are collected here as SF's brightest lights shine more radiantly than ever before.

Synopsis

The latest annual collection of outstanding science fiction stories features the contributions of Brian W. Aldiss, Ursula K. Le Guin, Gregory Benford, David Morrell, Gene Wolfe, Terry Bisson, and Michael Swanwick, among other notable masters of the speculative fiction genre. Original.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 560 KB
  • Print Length: 512 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books (13 Oct 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FC291G
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #381,698 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Best SF of Nearly a Decade Past 8 Jun 2011
By John M. Ford TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Kindle Edition
I've been working my way backward in time, reading progressively older editions of David Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer's annual collection of the best science fiction stories. This edition did not disappoint. As usual, the story introductions were superbly-written. They contain the right mix of introduction to the author, samples of his or her work, and non-spoiling teasers for the story itself. An unexpected prize in this year's introductory material was a pointer to Thomas Disch's The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World, a critical and intelligent examination of science fictions influences and influence.

My favorite five of the nineteen stories are:

Nancy Kress's "Computer Virus" throws together a rogue artificial intelligence and a mother and two children who are held hostage by it. The outcome depends on human qualities rather than rational ones.

Michael Swanwick's "Under's Game" serves up a wry answer to a question that always nagged at me about Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game.

Edward Lerner's "Creative Distruction" follows Justin Matthews as he solves his friend Alice's murder and uncovers the inter-stellar conspiracy behind it. The long-distance communications between civilizations are interestingly similar to those in Vernor Vinge's A Fire Upon The Deep.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and thought provoking anthology 14 Jun 2007
By I Read, Therefore I Blog VINE VOICE
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Hartwell has compiled a fine mixture of hard and character-driven science fiction (set on planets and in colonies and on space craft and a host of other locations), together with some brain bending experimental SF that plays with typography and story telling techniques. As such, there should be something for everyone who professes an interest in the genre.

Of the 19 writers, I confess that I was only familiar with the names Ursula Le Guin, Brian W. Aldiss and James Morrow before this collection, but I have certainly come away keen to find more work by Terry Bisson (whose contribution to this anthology, 'Charlie's Angels' is a wonderful mix of SF and noir told in the first person by a hard-bitten Supernatural Private Eye called Jack Villon and a complete joy to read) and Michael Swanwick (whose 'Under's Game' is a sly parody of Orson Scott Card's 'Ender's Game' that's told with a deft touch).

Of the other writers, I will say that I didn't enjoy either of the two more experimental SF stories. Firstly, 'The Cat's Pajamas' by James Morrow is actually three different stories, so you get the beginning of one story, the middle of another and the conclusion of a third. I know some people really get off on this way of playing with the story telling form, and Morrow is a skilled writer who does it better than most, but I'm a traditionalist and I like to have one story with a beginning, a middle and an end that follows the same characters or plot line. Secondly, whilst 'Undone' by James Patrick Kelly does follow the traditionalist story telling mode of beginning, middle and end, it also uses different type faces with some small sections of the plot told in concurrent columns.
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By Maciej TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
This seventh yearly anthology edited by David G. Hartwell presents a selection of SF stories he considered as best in 2001. This highly symbolic moment somehow failed to inspire this particular editor, because I found David G. Hartwell's seventh yearly collection significantly LESS GOOD than its immediate competitor, the Gardner Dozois anthology - which in 2001 was GREAT (see my review of this one).

This anthology doesn't have the yearly review and "honourable mentions" list offered by Dozois. It is also less voluminous than Dozois mastodons and more focused on short stories, instead of novellas. Still, there is nineteen stories to discover here and some of them are good - and three are REAL good.

Only five of stories figured also in Dozois selection (they are marked below with letters GD), however a further five of them also figured in "Redshift" collection. Therefore, if you have already those two collections, by buying this one you will get only nine new stories - but as amongst them will be the BEST one, well, I think it is still economically sound to purchase this book (especially if you buy a used copy).

A most peculiar thing happened also in this collection - one of stories, "A matter of mathematics" by Brian Aldiss, appears here for the SECOND TIME! It already figured in 1999 collection (Year's Best SF 5) by the same editor, but under its original title "An Apollo Asteroid". Since then Brian Aldiss re-published the story under a different title and the editor AGAIN included it in his yearly collection, but clearly without noticing that it is the SAME STORY he already published two years earlier, because there is no mention of this fact or of the initial title...
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Measure of All Things Worth the Price of the Book 19 May 2006
By Bonner '62 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
SF 7 is a good compulation worth reading. However, "The Measure of All Things" by Richard Chwedyk is exceptional and worth the price of the book all by itself. It has made me want to track down and read more Chwedyk to see if The Measure is a fluke or indicative of his usual work. Read this story! Especially if you are involved in animal rescue.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Free SF Reader 28 Jan 2008
By Blue Tyson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The editorial pair here single out the 'Red Shift' anthology by Al Sarrantonio for mention a number of times, so likely worth a look.

Overall, it seems 2001 was a really good year for SF stories, and this volume starts brilliantly, and ends almost as well. This anthology averages a hugely impressive 3.97, and that is good enough for full marks. Four standout stories, and only two are average.

Year's Best SF 07 : Computer Virus - Nancy Kress
Year's Best SF 07 : Charlie's Angels - Terry Bisson
Year's Best SF 07 : The Measure of All Things - Richard Chwedyk
Year's Best SF 07 : Russian Vine - Simon Ings
Year's Best SF 07 : Under's Game - Michael Swanwick
Year's Best SF 07 : A Matter of Mathematics - Brian Aldiss
Year's Best SF 07 : Creative Destruction - Edward M. Lerner
Year's Best SF 07 : Resurrection - David Morrell
Year's Best SF 07 : The Cat's Pajamas - James Morrow
Year's Best SF 07 : The Dog Said Bow-Wow - Michael Swanwick
Year's Best SF 07 : The Building - Ursula K. Le Guin
Year's Best SF 07 : Grey Earth - Stephen Baxter
Year's Best SF 07 : The Lagan Fishers - Terry Dowling
Year's Best SF 07 : In Xanadu - Thomas M. Disch
Year's Best SF 07 : The Go-Betweens - Lisa Goldstein
Year's Best SF 07 : Viewpoint - Gene Wolfe
Year's Best SF 07 : Anomalies - Gregory Benford
Year's Best SF 07 : Glacial - Alastair Reynolds
Year's Best SF 07 : Undone - James Patrick Kelly

House arrest.

5 out of 5

Killer robot case definitely not supernatural.

4 out of 5

Killer robot case definitely not supernatural.

4.5 out of 5

Illiterate people are easy, if you are aliens with territorial designs on Terra.

4 out of 5

Space Force firing performance needs junk food.

4 out of 5

Short cut.

3 out of 5

Alien nanotech radio plot.

4 out of 5

Father-son freeze.

4 out of 5

Brain in a jar down on the farm political ethics.

4 out of 5

Canine anti-tech adventures.

4 out of 5

Stonewalling.

3 out of 5

Alternate reality Big Whack human lack.

3.5 out of 5

A UN veteran, honored for his work in fighting a dangerous outbreak in the past, now lives with a new, strange botanical that is very valuable, and not very well understood.

4 out of 5

Welcome To the Pleasure Dome, not Frankie, not alive.

3.5 out of 5

Alien canine diplomacy.

"But you know, the dogs like us. That's got to count for something."

4.5 out of 5

Cash keepings off, rifled.

4 out of 5

Error observation religion.

4 out of 5

Clavain investigates why it is cold and almost all dead on a base.

4 out of 5

Future escape a problem of many dimensions.

4.5 out of 5
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Best SF of Nearly a Decade Past 4 Jun 2010
By John M. Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I've been working my way backward in time, reading progressively older editions of David Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer's annual collection of the best science fiction stories. This edition did not disappoint. As usual, the story introductions were superbly-written. They contain the right mix of introduction to the author, samples of his or her work, and non-spoiling teasers for the story itself. An unexpected prize in this year's introductory material was a pointer to Thomas Disch's The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World, a critical and intelligent examination of science fictions influences and influence.

My favorite five of the nineteen stories are:

Nancy Kress's "Computer Virus" throws together a rogue artificial intelligence and a mother and two children who are held hostage by it. The outcome depends on human qualities rather than rational ones.

Michael Swanwick's "Under's Game" serves up a wry answer to a question that always nagged at me about Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game.

Edward Lerner's "Creative Distruction" follows Justin Matthews as he solves his friend Alice's murder and uncovers the inter-stellar conspiracy behind it. The long-distance communications between civilizations are interestingly similar to those in Vernor Vinge's A Fire Upon The Deep.

Ursula Le Guin's "The Building" takes an anthropologist's view of two races, the Aq and the Adaqo, who are slowly recovering from the Adaqo's "explosive expansion of population and technology" that decimated their planet. The cultures are ingeniously conceived, the writing admirable, and the moral somehow both understated and heavy-handed.

Alastair Reynolds' "Glacial" was both new and familiar. It stands alone as a classic science fiction mystery. We look over Nevil Clavain's shoulder as he puzzles out the reason everyone on a remote, ice-covered planet suddenly died. As a fan of other Nevil Clavain stories, I have conflicting feelings about encountering Nevil, Galiana and Felka as an odd, but close-knit little family.

All of the stories are good and worth reading. I may not be giving them the full praise they deserve because I am distracted. The prepaid Kindle version of Year's Best SF 15 has just appeared in my iPhone Kindle app. Forgive me as I quickly abandon the past in a leap to new visions of the future in the present.
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth The Effort 22 Jun 2014
By Mike Indiana - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
A few great, most good, and a few...
But all in all, I enjoyed it and will read more from this editor in the future.
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice mix of stories 5 April 2014
By Billie too - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
As a lifetime fan of science and fantasy fiction I usually enjoy anthologies. This group of stories is no different in that I thoroughly enjoyed them all.
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