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Wrath of the Lemming-men (Chronicles of Isambard Smith 3) (Space Captain Smith) Paperback – 15 Jun 2009

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Wrath of the Lemming-men (Chronicles of Isambard Smith 3) (Space Captain Smith) + God Emperor of Didcot (Space Captain Smith) + A Game of Battleships (Space Captain Smith)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Myrmidon Books Ltd; 3 edition (15 Jun. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905802358
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905802357
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 68,277 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Toby Frost always wanted to write deep, philosophical novels, but his love of Biggles and Dan Dare got in the way of that. Whilst taking a break from composing his Renaissance fantasy masterpiece (currently gathering virtual dust on his hard drive) he started writing science fiction the way that he, at least, thought that it ought to be. As luck would have it, Myrmidon Books thought it ought to be that way too, and in one move Toby was turned from obscure lunatic to published author.

The Space Captain Smith website is at the surprising address of www.spacecaptainsmith.com. It contains the three (free!) Christmas stories as well as additional background nonsense.

Product Description

Review

"This warm-hearted and funny interstellar romp gives the sacred cows of sci-fi a good kicking before racing home in time for tea." --Dick Maggs, director, BBC Radio's The "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" on "Space Captain Smith"

About the Author

Toby Frost studied law and was called to the Bar in 2001. Since then, he has worked as a private tutor, a court clerk and a legal advisor to the motor industry. Unable to become Great Britain's foremost space explorer, he is content just to write about space exploration instead. He has also produced film reviews for the book The DVD Stack and articles for Solander magazine. Wrath of the Lemming Men is his third novel, sequel to Space Captain Smith and God Emperor of Didcot (May & September 2008).

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By C. Green TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Jun. 2009
Format: Paperback
This is the third in Toby Frost's series of Space Captain Smith's comic adventures and maintains the high standards set by the two previous volumes. Unlike many 'comic novels' 'Wrath of the Lemming Men' (WotLM) is genuinely, laugh out loud funny. More importantly it is also clever, erudite and at times pretty exciting.

Toby Frost has again pulled off the difficuly trick of writing a book that pokes fun at numerous targets but never slips into outright parody or spoof. WotLM may take the mickey out of or send up subjects as diverse as Star Wars, Starship Troopers, any World War II movie made between 1946 and 1970, the Mitford Sisters (seriously), Predator and the Archers (yes, really) to name but a few, but all the jokes stem from and fit seemlessly into the book's plot. Nothing feels tacked on for the sake of it or wildly out of context. This isn't the literary equivalent of the Airplane movies or a Mel Brooks film. The universe Captain Smith and his friends move in may be ridiculous but it also makes logical, albeit often hilarious, sense.

This allows Frost to include some pretty decent action sequences (although he never forgets to chuck in a few gags here and there), plus some actual characterisation. Smith and his chums aren't simply gag machines. Smith, for all his outward priggishness and prudishness, is actually rather brave and competent and Carveth, the sex-android-turned-pilot, is rather endearing. Even Suruk, Smith's homicidal alien friend and Rhihanna, his hippyish love interest, have been given some additional depth over the course of three books.

The only area where WotLM doesn't quite measure up to the two previous books is the plot. The fact that there is an actual, proper plot rather that a string of gags is grounds for congratulation.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Porter on 5 July 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm pleased to say that Toby Frost shows no signs of waning powers in the third of his hilarious 'British Space Empire' novels. Sure, it's not quite as funny as 'God Emperor of Didcot', and there's the odd loose end, but then again, how many books are as funny as 'God Emperor of Didcot'?

What I liked about this one was that the author seemed to be getting into his characters more. Particularly Carveth, the sex-bot turned cowardly pilot / engineer, who is given a lot more coverage (which is good, because I've been fond of her since book one), with a number of scenes all of her own, including a hilarious confrontation with a Jane Austen-bot who has a thing for men in uniform. Also, Suruk the Slayer is becoming much more developed: now he's a full blown, three dimensional psychopath. And all the old favourites, like W and the insane commandos. Even 462 is becoming slightly less dislikable.

But of course, there are the wonderful jokes. The Yull (aka the Lemming Men of the title) have gods whose names are a hoot. We learn that Suruk's ancestors faked evidence to make it look as if they had built the pyramids so as to confuse foolish Earth-people. And we're told where the meteorite that killed the dinosaurs really came from. And there's always Tar'kha the Death Otter.

Anyway, what are you waiting for: buy it, and let's hope number four is as good.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. N. J. D. Chinn on 22 July 2009
Format: Paperback
You might call Isambard Smith the Anti-Flashman, though the covers at first seem similar. But look closely at that cover. Does Smith have a scantly clad woman draped around his leg? No, he's standing victorious over a dead foe. Proper.

Smith is about as different to Flashman as you can get. He's not a womanizer, a coward, or a bully for one (well, three) thing(s). About the only thing they have in common is a decent mustache. But Smith isn't a larger than life hero without flaws. Outside of a good fight he's downright awkward, especially around members of the opposite sex. But he also embodies everything we're meant to see in the British Space Empire - noble and refined, with its citizens carrying a stiff upper lip and not dealing with things like "feelings" in public. Dreadnought Diplomacy is alive and well. When one speaks of "civilizing" an alien culture, it refers to how the iron fist is used if talking sensibly to the silly buggers didn't work.

Smith's long time friend is a Morlock (or M'Lak) called Suruk the Slayer (Doom Purveyor, Son of Agshad Nine-Swords, Grandson of Urgar the Miffed). The M'Lak look vaguely like a thin version of the Predator but their personality better fits the "noble savage" archetype from classic adventure literature like King Solomon's Mines

To act as a foil to Smith and Suruk are two women: Pollyanna Carveth, a fugitive sex toy masquerading as the ship's pilot, and Rhianna Mitchell, a New-New Age hippie herbalist from the American Free States (think California). Despite the fact she is so unlike Smith - or perhaps because of it - he can't help but fall head over heals for her, nor can he help but blow almost every opportunity he has to score with her.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Iain McClumpha on 30 Jun. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been waiting for this since November (it was trailed in "God Emperor of Didcot") and the wait has been worth it.

Smith and his chums are once again in the thick of things as the evil Ghasts and their suicidal allies the Yull attempt to create the ultimate Ghast soldier.

The characters are becoming more and more real as each book goes by - so much so that Polly Carveth has now burnt herself into my brain - a sex-a-droid turned pilot, always afraid, but always manages to somehow pull through.
Smith is becoming a true hero, even if he is a bit dim at times.
Suruk tke Slayer is becoming funnier... and Rhianna? Well she's always been weird.
Ghast commander 462 is a truly hissable villain, and with each encounter he has with Smith seems to result in yet another injury.
And new villain, Yull General Vock - fantastically well written.

Toby Frost has to be the finest writer of genre comedy out there, and these books deserve to be million sellers and win him some kind of reward.
Come on BBC, adapt this into a series... it is just crying out for some sort of screen version - just don't let Hollywood get their mits on it.

Well done Toby... now, give us another!
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