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The Worst Rock 'n Roll Records of All Time: A Fan's Guide to the Stuff You Love to Hate Paperback – 1 Jan 2001


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Product details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Citadel Press (1 Jan. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0806512318
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806512310
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 18 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,254,674 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Synopsis

A collection of rock's fifty worst singles and albums.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Written on 1991, this book is extremely funny at mocking at much of the sacred cows of rock music. Let's face it, much of rock music is terribly pretentious and immature (which is a natural thing to happen when a twentysomething person, probably without much education, is encouraged to make grand statements about the state of the world). Since this book was written 15 years ago, the ouevre of the rock "artists" of the last 15 years is not included here (we are therefore spared of the mockery of such pretentious contemporary artists as Chris Martin, to bring forward a name). Schlock recordings are disparaged, but much space is dedicated to attacks on such pretentious and overrrated bands of the seventies such as Yes, Queen, Jethro Tull, The Doors, Genesis, etc. (Though I have to say that I like Queen; what the book says about them is a bit unfair). And even good artists like the Rolling Stones or Bob Dylan are mocked when they put out a bad album. A criticism might be put forward that this book has its own bias toward roots music. The authors have very little use for pop or techno, but this can be legitimate music in its own right. Squibbles and all, this is a very funny book for those who like rock.
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By A Customer on 9 April 1999
Format: Paperback
The concept of this book is exhilirating: reviewing thousands of lps, eps, singles, and artists' works and then finding the worst examples of rock and roll in each subject. In many instances, the authors picked the right subjects. Unfortunately, they limited themselves to mostly mainstream artists. Of course, reviewing indie releases would have been a bigger hassle, but its still dispiritng. Reading the book, the points the authors make tend to make one realize that other artists' songs and albums should be there. Goth rock, punk, new wave, and other alternative rock are missing. It could be because the authors enjoy them, but at the beginning they mention how cult artists are as bad as mainstream artists in many instances. Still, the authors are frequently funny, and its nice to know that rock fans can make fun of the music that they and basically us all grew up on without an iota of self-consciousness
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Feb. 1999
Format: Paperback
What a change from the plethora of books and magazine articles claiming to tell us what the BEST rock records are. This book can be appreciated by anyone who loves rock, but the more familiar you are with rock history and the more cynical you are about the music you love, the more you'll appreciate this book. I particularly liked the entries on Cat Stevens and Andrew Gold. I have always wanted to write to these two authors with some humble comments and suggestions should a revision of this book ever come out. First, isn't it a little of a copout to put Lou Reed's "Metal Machine Music" as #2 when that album was meant to be bad in the first place? How about replacing it with Leonard Cohen's "Death of a Ladies' Man", which was so murdered by the glossy overproduction of Phil Spector that Mr. Spector kept the tapes under lock and key before its release lest Mr. Cohen might have it destroyed. Cohen disavowed the record before it was released, and it is probably the only record that is associated more with its producer (announced on big warning letters on the cover) than its artist. Also for a future edition: Yes' "Union", which was a desperate attempt to clear the legal problems of the dinosaur band's name for once and for all by having EVERYBODY who ever played on a Yes album play on it. I could go on, I suppose, but this is just a review. These two truly love their subject, and I really appreciate learning laughing and remembering with this book.
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By Darryl W. Bullock on 4 Feb. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fascinating, funny but, unfortunately, a little too weighted towards American radio in the 80s. Worth a read but hardly essential.
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