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The Worst Journey In The World (Vintage Classics) Paperback – 1 Apr 2010

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Product details

  • Paperback: 720 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Classics (1 April 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099530376
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099530374
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 23,389 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"'The Worst Journey in the World is to travel what War and Peace is to the novel... a masterpiece'" (New York Review of Books)

"The best polar book there is" (Observer)

"Probably the best adventure yarn ever published" (Independent)

"Remains the masterpiece of heroic travel" (The Times)

"The finest book ever written about Antarctic exploration as well as a great literary classic" (Peter Matthiessen)

Book Description

'When people ask me... "What is your favourite travel book?" I nearly always name this book. It is about courage, misery, starvation, heroism, exploration, discovery and friendship' Paul Theroux

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Bob Salter TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
In an age of cynicism and the popular sport of debunking of old heroes, this book makes a refreshing read. It was written in a more innocent age and this is certainly a strenth of the book together with the honest integrity of the author Cherry Apsley-Gerrard. Here is a man well qualified to write of Scott's last expedition as he was there. Not only well qualified but a fine writer in his own right as anyone reading the book will find. His final lines are some of the finest prose to be found anywhere.

Through the authors eyes we get to know the persons involved in a more intimate way. Scott, highly strung and full of nervous energy but a true leader of men. The author does not shirk in describing him. Wilson, the gentle man of science who is popular with everyone. The indefatigable Bowers willing to take on any task with a cheerful face. The taciturn Oates, who people only seem to remember for his heroic gesture, turns out to be a gifted orator illuminating many a long polar night with his unsuspected gift.

In this age we should be inspired by their bravery for the advances of science,their comradeship and their ability to take on impossible tasks without complaint. We should admire the resolute way they refused to leave any man behind, unlike some modern day mountaineers who choose to ignore the dying, ensnared in that temporary insanity known as summit fever. These men lived like true English gentlemen and died like true English gentlemen. The grain ran deep. In an age when many an unworthy is held up as a hero, here we have examples to all of what this word truly means. Probably the best travel book ever written.

"If you march your Winter journeys you will have your reward, so long as all you want is a penguin's egg". Apsley Cherry-Garrard.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By book lover on 28 Jan. 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a n amazing book that I would recommend anyone to read.

Apsley Cherry-Garrard ("Cherry") was one of the Antarctic Heros in the heroic age. Most people know about Scott, Oates, Evans, Wilson and Bowers who died returning from the pole but Cherry was one of those who formed the support group and who in the end found the bodies. But that is not "the worst journey"; that title is reserved for the journey Cherry and two others made in the depths of the Antarctic winter to get some Emperor Penguin eggs in conditions that can be barely imagined.

This is the only book written by Cherry; he was encouraged to write it by his close neighbour George Bernard Shaw and completed it only after participating in the first world war. Apart from Cherry's writing which is amazing there is also an excellent biographical section.

Thoroughly recommended.

If you enjoy this then I also recommend a book on another unsung hero, Tom Crean.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By simbunny78@hotmail.com on 5 Sept. 2001
Format: Hardcover
Having just finished 'The worst journey in the world' it is fresh in my mind. I finished the book in a two day reading marathon. I found Apsley Cherry-Gerrard's writing evocative and riveting even though it is nearly eighty years since it was written. The story is told with candour, honesty and great attention to detail. Cherry-Gerrard evokes and describes the atmosphere and relationships in Scott's hut during the three years between 1911 and 1913 that they were there. The account he gives of the astounding, and finally tragic, journeys they made left me awed at what they managed to achieve with primitive equipment and knowledge. It left me with a feeling of wonder and respect for these pioneering men of polar exploration. My residing impression was not of the tragedy that befell Scott's party on their Polar expedition but of the great contribution the party made to knowledge of Antarctic geography and travel.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Stanton on 22 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback
He wasn't lying with that title, but what's missed out is that it's perhaps the most incredible journey too, as well as one of the most incredible books I've ever read (if I could give this 10 stars it wouldn't be enough).

Concerning Scott's last expedition to the Antarctic of which I previously knew woefully little (even though he's a hometown boy), I no longer have to lament that fact thanks to this most comprehensive and compelling account by Apsley Cherry-Garrard who, at 24, was a member of the expedition (though not of the last dash to the pole) and made it back to tell the tale. Painstakingly compiled from not only Garrard's diaries and remembrances but also through those of the other men, from letters home and the many, meticulous records of the journey (it chiefly having a scientific object), Garrard fully presses home the ideal that these men strove to uphold even in the face of certain death - to shine a little light on the darkest, most inhospitable corners of the world and bring forth a little more knowledge, laying a foundation for those who came after to build upon.

Garrard does a truly fantastic job of immersing you in his material, not only giving you all of the detail surrounding the expedition down to temperatures, wind directions, logistics, etc but also painting a vivid picture of their lives there. Alongside the hardships there are moments of wonder and joy; in the beauty of their surroundings, of their discoveries and studies and in the way Garrard writes of the personalities of the animals and men (I adored the indomitable Bowers as, clearly, did Garrard).
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