or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Fulfillment Express Add to Cart
9.81
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

World Of Oz [Limited Edition, Original recording remastered]

The World of Oz Audio CD
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 9.85 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Monday, 14 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Amazon's The World of Oz Store

Music

Image of album by The World of Oz

Photos

Image of The World of Oz
Visit Amazon's The World of Oz Store
for all the music, photos, discussions, and more.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Spend 30 and get Norton 360 21.0 - 3 Computers, 1 Year 2014 for 24.99. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Audio CD (30 May 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Limited Edition, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Repertoire
  • ASIN: B000EHRXRM
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 102,375 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. The Muffin Man
2. Bring The Ring
3. Jackie
4. Beside The Fire
5. The Hum-Gum Tree
6. With a Little Help
7. We've All See The Queen
8. King Croesus
9. Mandy-Ann
10. Jack
11. Like a Tear
12. Willow's Harp
13. The Muffin Man (Mono Single Version) (Bonus Track)
14. Peter's Birthday (Bonus Track)
15. Jack (Mono Single Version) (Bonus Track)
16. King Croesus (Mono Single Version) (Bonus Track)
17. The Hum Gum Tree (Mono Single Version) (Bonus Track)
18. Beside The Fire (Mono Single Version) (Bonus Track)
19. Willow's Harp (Mono Single Version) (Bonus Track)
20. Like A Tear (Mono Single Version) (Bonus Track)

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.2 out of 5 stars
4.2 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Impossible ......... 24 Mar 2006
Format:Audio CD
When I was in my teens and songs were a hit in my neck o' the woods, I always assumed they were hits in the UK and/or the US also. Of course I grew out of that naive state of mind pretty fast but to find that neither "Muffin Man" nor "King Croesus" was a hit anywhere but in Holland really blew my mind.
Because the prices of Japanese imports are way over my budget ( and frankly take the fun out of collecting music from where I'm sitting ) I had to be content with a digitalised vinyl transfer of the World Of Oz album for years. But here it is, released on CD in the Western Hemisphere at long last ! And what a beautiful remastering job the guys at Repertoire did do.
If you're into late 60s pop with orchestral accompaniment, with flourishes of lite- and fairy-tale-psych, this one's a winner. Though the production is rounder and warmer, the overall atmos on the album is reminiscent of the Bee Gees' 1st Album and at times the lead-singer sounds a bit like Robin Gibb with more body.
So OK, in originality they don't score big points but the main attraction to the World Of Oz are the songs. They are all very uplifting and well written with great melodic hooks that will make you sing, hum or whistle them for days on end without getting stale. And when you get home the first thing you do is give your CD another spin. It's really that good !
The bonus tracks are 45s' mono mixes and add only Peter's Birthday to the album tracks.
peace,
Martin
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, childlike 1960s pop 13 April 2006
By D. J. H. Thorn TOP 1000 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Great melodies, simple songs and a production that consists of the full works, "World Of Oz" is a magical world indeed. It's in much the same territory as Mark Wirtz, The Herd and all those other transitory late 1960s pop acts that presented a colourful, unchallenging escape. There might not be any hits, but the singles "Muffin Man" and "King Croesus" are unforgettable. Having said that, there are catchy melodies and sumptuous arrangements all over this album. The band themselves were a four-piece with a suitably boyish lead singer. The bonus tracks don't add much as all but one are single versions of album tracks but there is quality enough without them.

This issue is a very limited run which is not surprising given the band's lack of fame. Not classic status then, but well worth buying if you're a sucker for the genre.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent toytown gem 15 Oct 2010
Format:Audio CD
A lot of people compare the sound on this album to that of the first few Bee Gee's albums. I do agree, but I find that the song writing and general atmosphere of this album is of a higher standard.

This is one of my favourite albums from any genre - but as a piece of late sixties toytown pop I think it is the absolute best around (along with the Idle Race - Birthday Party). It is, being of the toytown persuasion, very poppy and very childish. If you are into very melodic, sing-along pop with fairytale imagery then this is definitely an album you should purchase! Strangely - the singles released from this album were obviously chosen with the psychedelic market in mind. These tracks are at the latter end of the album and are not at all representative of the album as a whole.

Track by track rating -

Peter's Birthday - 5/5 - A great opener. A surprisingly dark track considering the genre, but it works very well.

Muffin Man - 5/5 - One of the quintessential toytown singles. Pure sing-along, nursery rhyme pop. Brilliant.

Ring the Ring - 5/5 - Very similar to the early Bee Gee's sound. Less childish than the first two tracks but it is a great track nonetheless.

Jackie - 5/5 - A lovely little song about love ;). I'm sure many people may find this nauseating but for those of you who enjoy simple pop songs about love then you
will thoroughly enjoy this one.

Beside the Fire - 5/5 - A great example of song writing. I struggle every time I listen to this song to stop myself from wailing along.

The Hum-Gum Tree - 5/5 - The closest this band ever got to rock. It still retains the poppy feel introduces a heavyish (for the period) riff for the bridge. It works very well.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Audio CD
Came back to this LP/CD after being recently inspired by 'Tara Tiger Girl' a brilliant track that former lead singer of The World Of Oz Chris Evans (Robin) did the lead vocals on (when he was with The Casuals). It has to be said that this album co-incidentally has a lot in common with The Casuals 'Hour World' not only both coming from 1969 but with similar ideas for sleeves, musical matters, record label & lyrics. Opening with the orchestral melodic pop of 'The Muffin Man' which is probably the best track here (also the one that they are most remembered for) is original in ideas (coming from an old nursery rhyme) about a guy selling muffins door to door & happy to fall in love with someone he meets. 'Bring The Ring' is a gentle pretty whimsical piece with an eloquent vocal delivery. 3rd track 'Jackie' sounds a lot like The Bee Gees 'I Started A Joke' with the sound of Robin Gibb but is unique & beautifully melancholic in itself and Chris has a fine voice "I love you Jackie...and having you all through the night". 'Beside The Fire' continues this gentle feeling & beautiful emotion of the two previous outings before moving into the more harder pop psych of 'The Hum Gum Tree' as our couple make forbidden love under the hum gum tree. Again they approach The Bee Gees as heard via 'With A Little Help'. More up-tempo is the orchestral 'We've All Seen The Queen' which has '67 Beatle type harmonies (full bodied harmonies throughout though generally reminding more of Marmalade/DDDBM&T style). 'King Croesus' with its moody organ & flute opening conjures up a Marbles type treatment. 'Mandy-Ann' is pretty & bouncy before changing to whimsical reflection. 'Jack' a song about a certain Jack & his grandparents takes toy town whimsy to new extremes, & has some nice guitar sitar. Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth a listen for British 60's psych-pop fans 1 Jan 2008
By Elliot Knapp - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
The reviewer who so righteously panned this album apparently didn't think at all about what he was getting into by purchasing this CD and expected it to be something it's obviously not: Before getting incensed that this album isn't Velvet Underground (and why should it be?!), he should have remembered this is British psychedelic rock from the late 60's. Fans of the genre's most famous (in the mainstream) albums like Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, Pink Floyd's The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, the Zombies' Odessey and Oracle and less-famous but equally worthwhile albums like Tomorrow, The Pretty Things' S.F. Sorrow, and Kaleidoscope's Tangerine Dream know that British psychedelia more often than not includes gloriously lush production (orchestras, and yes, even slide whistles), very British vocals, songs full of stories that are often whimsical, a sense of melody that sometimes borders on the sing-song and, maybe most importantly, an effort to make the music and recording recreate or enhance drug experiences. When taken in this context, The World of Oz's only album not only makes a lot more sense, it's also pretty good and easy to appreciate as a well-crafted collection of pop songs.

Really, the album's cover gives a bit of the wrong impression--aside from the artwork (which delightfully reproduces a plethora of characters from the Wizard of Oz books), the band and the songs have absolutely nothing to do with the Wizard of Oz. In fact, in comparison with many other British psych bands, these guys aren't quite as psychedelic as they are marketed. Their primary connections to psych lies in the subject matter of the songs (delightfully playful hooks and song premises) and the presence of a full orchestra on most of the tracks. Other than that and the odd guitar effect on "Humgum Tree" and "Like a Tear," the album is less of a psychedelic trip and more of a sly and light-hearted pop record, which makes a lot of sense--the World of Oz put out a clutch of moderately-successful to totally unsuccessful singles, which were eventually collected with a few other tracks to make up this album. In this sense, it's not really as much of a proper studio album as a compilation of pre-recorded singles with other songs (really not uncommon in all areas of pop music at the time, since most labels required bands to release successful singles before allowing them to make a whole album).

As for the music and songs themselves, they tend more toward the Bee Gees' brand of sunny (if occasionally melancholy) psych pop than something with a tougher edge like the Move or the Pretty Things. "The Muffin Man" is a slice of pop heaven, with some great brass parts and soaring harmonies. "Bring the Ring" is one of my favorites; a gentle-to-rocking ballad. Despite the orchestra, you can clearly hear in the left channel a pretty tough, rocking rhythm section with driving bass and pounding drums. I think the lack of a strong, forward guitar presence on many of the songs account for the slight misinterpretation that it doesn't "rock."

The intro to "Jackie" always makes me think the band is going to launch into the Bee Gees' "I Started a Joke." A couple of my other favorites include the great verses of "We've All Seen the Queen," the lamenting ballad "King Croesus," and the rollicking "Mandy-Ann." From a pop standpoint, there's not really a weak song in the bunch, as they're all laden with hooks and slick production. The only song that really gets on my nerves is "Jack," ostensibly about a child playing in a park with his grandparents, which takes whimsy in the least interesting direction it could go.

If you're a fan of British psychedelic music and know what to expect, you'll probably get plenty of enjoyment out of this album--it's pretty obscure, and if you've exhausted the genre, it'll be an enjoyable addition to your collection. If you're a fan of harder rock, you'd probably do best elsewhere. If you've never purchased a Repertoire reissue before, you'll probably be delighted with the packaging, liner note mini-poster, and attention to detail with regards to package and remastering. The bonus tracks are pretty unnecessary--they're all mono mixes of the songs from the album that were also released as singles with the exception of "Peter's Birthday," which is one of the coolest and weirdest in the bunch. I appreciate when a record label goes the extra mile to add some extra tracks, but I'm not so sure that anyone's such a big World of Oz fan that they want mono and stereo versions of every single.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Down the yellow brick road... 12 April 2005
By B. O'Keefe - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
With their brilliant single 'Peter's Birthday', which has been featured on various psych comps over the years, the World of Oz proved themselves to be true veterans of the pop-syke genre.

The group was signed to Deram in 1968 where they recorded three singles (including the aforementioned) and one album ('World of Oz', the one, here, in review). The band also appeared on such British TV shows as 'Beat Club' and 'Colour Me Pop'.

Overall, not much is known about the World of Oz, except that they were landmark musicians and songwriters. Each member was as crucial as the next in creating what would be their sole full-length. It is an amazing album, filled with whimsical tones and at times even haunting lyrics. It is a great departure from adulthood into childhood, and then full circle back into reality.

A must have for any psych collector or pop-syke lover!

Factoids:

1. The album was recorded in Decca studios in West Hampstead.

2. The Moody Blues recorded simultaneously in the underlying studio of the same venue.

3. A thirty-three-piece orchestra played on/for the track 'Muffin Man'.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nice Catchy pysch pop 28 Sep 2006
By zphage - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This is well crafted British pysch pop influenced by the Hollies and Bee Gees. Tight vocal driven songs with lush orchestration and a touch of playful British whimsy. Definitely on par with Rainbow Ffollies, Hollies, and Bee Gees late 60's efforts.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars World Of Oz - self-titled (Repertoire) 2 Jun 2010
By Mike Reed - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Originally released in 1969, as this was the British psychedelic pop band's sole record. Not a favorite of mine, but okay + good to share with other fans of sound of days long gone. Tunes I liked the most were "Bring The Ring", the fantastic trippy "Hum-Gum Tree With A Litlle Help", "We've All Seen The Queen" and "Like A Tear". Personnel: Christopher Robins - guitar, piano & vocals, Tony Clarkson - bass & vocals, David Kubiner - organ and David Reay - drums. Should do something good for fans of The Herd, Herman's Hermits, early Bee Gees and The Kinks.
4.0 out of 5 stars beautiful gentle whimsical reflections to soft psych 5 Feb 2012
By R.Cooper - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Came back to this LP/CD after being recently inspired by 'Tara Tiger Girl' a brilliant track that former lead singer of The World Of Oz Chris Evans (Robin) did the lead vocals on (when he was with The Casuals). It has to be said that this album co-incidentally has a lot in common with The Casuals 'Hour World' not only both coming from 1969 but with similar ideas for sleeves, musical matters, record label & lyrics. Opening with the orchestral melodic pop of 'The Muffin Man' which is probably the best track here (also the one that they are most remembered for) is original in ideas (coming from an old nursery rhyme) about a guy selling muffins door to door & happy to fall in love with someone he meets. 'Bring The Ring' is a gentle pretty whimsical piece with an eloquent vocal delivery. 3rd track 'Jackie' sounds a lot like The Bee Gees 'I Started A Joke' with the sound of Robin Gibb but is unique & beautifully melancholic in itself and Chris has a fine voice "I love you Jackie...and having you all through the night". 'Beside The Fire' continues this gentle feeling & beautiful emotion of the two previous outings before moving into the more harder pop psych of 'The Hum Gum Tree' as our couple make forbidden love under the hum gum tree. Again they approach The Bee Gees as heard via 'With A Little Help'. More up-tempo is the orchestral 'We've All Seen The Queen' which has '67 Beatle type harmonies (full bodied harmonies throughout though generally reminding more of Marmalade/DDDBM&T style). 'King Croesus' with its moody organ & flute opening conjures up a Marbles type treatment. 'Mandy-Ann' is pretty & bouncy before changing to whimsical reflection. 'Jack' a song about a certain Jack & his grandparents takes toy town whimsy to new extremes, & has some nice guitar sitar. 'Like A Tear' with tabla & notions of psych falling somewhere between the Moody Blues & Ian Matthews. The original album excellently closes with yet another single released in the pretty 'Willow's Harp'. Other than mono versions of the singles then the only other track presented (not on the original LP) is 'Peter's Birthday' (B side of 'The Muffin Man') which is beautifully twee reminding of Keith West amongst others "black & white rainbows took him away". In summary the songs are not really strong enough for classic status but that instead you'll find beautiful peaceful moments mixed with gentle whimsical reflections to soft psych & generally an escape from the harder edged sounds from those times.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback