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Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole (X Press Black Classics Series) Paperback – 30 Sep 1999

4.8 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Paperback, 30 Sep 1999
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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: The X Press; New edition edition (30 Sept. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1874509859
  • ISBN-13: 978-1874509851
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 12.4 x 1.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,017,996 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Mary Seacole was born to a Scottish soldier father and free black mother in Kingston, Jamaica in 1805. She travelled to England in the 1850s after building her reputation as a nurse. Her work in the Crimea during the war earned her the Crimean medal and she played a crucial role in opening up the medical and nursing professions to women. She died in obscurity in England in 1881.
Sara Salih is Assistant Professor in English at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Judith Butler (Routledge 2002), and the editor, with Judith Butler, of The Judith Butler Reader (Blackwell, 2004). She is currently working on a book about representations of 'brown' women in England and Jamaica from the eighteenth century to the present day.


Sara Salih is Assistant Professor in English at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Judith Butler (Routledge 2002), and the editor, with Judith Butler, of The Judith Butler Reader (Blackwell, 2004). She is currently working on a book about representations of 'brown' women in England and Jamaica from the eighteenth century to the present day.

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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I was born in the town of Kingston, in the island of Jamaica, some time in the present century. Read the first page
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Format: Paperback
Mary Seacole's reputation after the Crimean War certainly rivalled that of her counterpart Florence Nightingale but for a very long time she was a forgotten footnote in history, and this probably had a lot to do with the fact she was not a white middle class woman, but was instead the offspring of two races, that of a Scottish father and a black Jamaican mother.

She was a born healer and a woman of tremendous energy, she overcame official indifference and racial prejudice as she strove to prove her worth as a Nurse on par with Nightingale herself.

Seacole got herself out to the war by her own efforts and at her own expense, she risked her life to bring comfort to the wounded and dying soldiers; and became one of the first black woman to make a mark on British public life.

But while Florence Nightingale has gone down in history, Mary Seacole was relegated to obscurity until very recently.

This book tells her story in her own words, of her travels, her experiences, her life as a woman in colour living in a time of bigotry, prejudice and racial hatred.

It's a fantastic book and brings to life in its many pages a woman of courage and moral conviction that what she was doing with her life was the right thing to do. To me Mary Seacole optimises the Crimean War in a way that Nightingale never can. A book worthy to be read in schools in the way that Anne Frank is read even now in the 21st century.
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Format: Paperback
Everyone's heard of Flo with the lamp, but not many people know about Mary Seacole,the half-caste lady who set up the 'British Hotel' during the Crimean war and fed, nursed and cared for our lads.
The book reads as if she is talking to you like a best friend,the language is easy, the situations range from the desperate to the comical,and the feeling that you come away with is of awe for this spunky lady and inspiration that 'where there is a will there is a way.'
Great reading for historians, nurses or ladies with attitude!
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Format: Paperback
Having taught about the life of Mary Seacole during Black History month for many years I decided this year to read her autobiography. What a treat! Her feisty personality shines through in her writing. She certainly lived life to the full, and didn't tolerate fools gladly. I found it quite endearing that she enjoyed every minute of her fame in London society and was a good self publicist.She had certainly earnt her fame with her bravery under fire in the Crimean War
A brave opinionated woman who well deserves to be more widely known.(This is quite a quick read if you don't read the footnotes but I found them fascinating.)
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Format: Paperback
I would thoroughly recommend The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands as a fascinating read. A very unusual lady for her time. Her matter of fact comments throughout concerning social attitudes of the day make her story all the more remarkable.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoyed it but what happened to Mother Seacole after she came back from the Crimea is a life lesson in putting your own financial security before you put the security of others before yours. She was selfless and a true heroine and love everything British but as Salman Rushdie once said that she was looked over in favour of Florence Nightingale only because of the colour of her skin. The book makes you feel as if you are in the thick of the adventurous life of Mother Seacole as well as the harshness of the Crimean war. What is interesting is the sense of history repeating itself, because Mother Seacole talks about issues such as racism and war in the Crimea; two thing that are still prevalent in 2015.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great interesting book. As a nurse we all hear about Florence but mam Seacole is an inspirational woman who was very humble.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading this; it delights at so many levels. A historical record-albeit according to Mrs S.-of events in Panama and Crimea; descriptions of the shenanigans of British politicians over the Crimean War(Afghanistan comes to mind); and what shines through above all is the sheer guts of a black woman in a largely racist world. She never gives up. What a character.
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