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Women's Work, 1840-1940 (New Studies in Economic and Social History) [Hardcover]

Elizabeth Roberts
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
RRP: £37.99
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Book Description

28 Sep 1995 New Studies in Economic and Social History (Book 6)
This volume addresses some of the difficult issues surrounding women's work during a century of social upheaval, and demonstrates how hard it is to be precise about the nature and extent of women's occupations. It focuses on working-class women and the many problems relating to their work, full-time and part-time, paid and unpaid, outside and inside the home. Elizabeth Roberts examines men's attitudes to women's work, the difficulties of census enumeration and women's connections with trade unions. She also tackles in depth other areas of contention such as the effects of legislation on women's work, a 'family wage', and unequal pay and status. Dr Roberts' study provides a unique overview of an expanding field of social and economic history, while her survey of the available literature is a useful guide to further reading.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 108 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st Cambridge University Press Ed edition (28 Sep 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521552656
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521552653
  • Product Dimensions: 22.4 x 14.2 x 1.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,950,242 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

Book Description

Elizabeth Roberts addresses the problems surrounding working-class women and their work, examining issues such as women and trade unions, men's attitudes, and unequal pay and status. Her book is a unique overview of a contentious area, and a full bibliography guides students to further reading.

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This pamphlet attempts to survey women's work in Great Britain in the century 1840-1940. Read the first page
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Elizabeth Roberts provides a clear, concise account of the changes faced by both working-class and middle-class women throughout the century 1840-1940, and the impact the Industrial Revolution had on not only their working lives, but their home lives too. The book deals with such issues as the effect industrialization and capitalism had on patriarchy in Britain. Readers will be amazed and sometimes angered at the dreadful working conditions, levels of pay and subordination endured by many working-class women, desperate to contribute to the family income, often while still being of child-bearing age. Roberts demonstrates the problems of running a household and bringing up children- the struggle to find decent,affordable child-care and continue to work. She examines in detail the effects of women acquiring the vote, and the differences and, some would argue the fleeting independence women experienced when they took the place of men in World War 1, only to have to give up the "man's work" and return to the sweated-trades, domestic service and the textile industries upon their return.Middle-class women in the 19th century were obliged to conform to the 'domestic ideology' of the time, and were seperated from the world of public affairs. Towards the end of this century however, the more affluent members of the middle-class were providing education for their daughters, who in turn had aspirations of their own outside of the family.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent historical tool 14 Nov 2008
Format:Hardcover
I have read this book as part of my Master's course.

Synopsis:

This volume addresses some of the difficult issues surrounding women's work during a century of social upheaval, and demonstrates how hard it is to be precise about the nature and extent of women's occupations. It focuses on working-class women and the many problems relating to their work, full-time and part-time, paid and unpaid, outside and inside the home. Elizabeth Roberts examines men's attitudes to women's work, the difficulties of census enumeration and women's connections with trade unions. She also tackles in depth other areas of contention such as the effects of legislation on women's work, a `family wage', and unequal pay and status. Dr Roberts' study provides a unique overview of an expanding field of social and economic history, while her survey of the available literature is a useful guide to further reading.

I found this a gem of a book. It is only 70 pages long which I was able to read in a couple of hours. It is full of information and it takes a different view of women in this period. There is not a feminist feel or take of this period of history which is rather unusual and is a great tool for historical comparisons. This book is very easy to dip in and out of, easy to follow and understand and the content is very interesting and informative.

9/10
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