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Women with Men Hardcover – 4 Sep 1997


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: The Harvill Press; First Edition edition (4 Sep 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 186046341X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1860463419
  • Product Dimensions: 19.2 x 13.6 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,030,179 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

`At once funny and heartbreaking as Ford's work usually is ...
This is fiction at its finest' -- John Banville

`This sparkling collection sees Ford at the top of his form' -- Sunday Telegraph --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Richard Ford was born in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1944. He has published five novels and three collections of stories, including The Sportswriter, Independence Day, Wildlife, A Multitude of Sins and most recently The Lay of the Land. Independence Day was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Dec 1998
Format: Paperback
a collection of three novellas from richard ford. in all three it is women who seem more in control , more defined in themselves and in what they want or dont want from their lives. this is middle aged angst at its best but real serious and to the bone . no flippant nonsense here.you feel the struggle the characters go through ,though it is hard to find much empathy for them as they wallow around in the pool of their failings. it is not a long book but you feel you have been on a major journey . a great read ...for men and women both .
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John P. Jones III TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 Dec 2010
Format: Paperback
There is the selection of stories itself that is interesting. Two are primarily set in Paris, the book ends for one set in Montana. Meaningful design, or whimsy?

In both the stories set in Paris, there is a strong element of American "innocents abroad," traveling out of their depth, with an inchoate sense that Paris will solve the problems of their shallow lives. In the first story, "The Womanizer," the American protagonist, Martin Austin, is nominally a happily married, yet is pulled to a certain "je ne sais quoi" that seems to envelop French women. Ford has a remarkable ability to portray what is Austin's mind, while at the same time depicting the reality that he is oblivious to. At one point Austin sees, sitting in a café, "a man with soiled lapels, in need of a shave and short of cash, scribbling his miserable thoughts into a tiny spiral notebook like all the other morons he's seen who'd thrown their lives away," which is a haunting foreshadowing of the inevitable, tragic denouement of Austin's odyssey - certainly far more tragic than my limited imagination could have predicted.

In the third story, "Occidentals," a "retired" white English professor, who through a fluke, had become a black studies specialist, has taken one of his former students, who is eight years older than him, for their first trip to Paris. She has cancer, and a classic checklist of sights that must be seen. At one point she meets former friends, the true "Ugly Americans" abroad, and they have dinner. They scene is a painful read, for regrettably it is not crude caricature, but an accurate depiction of those who are uncomfortable out of their own narrow cultural norms. Likewise, there is another tragic denouement.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gargoyle on 29 Jan 2010
Format: Paperback
I think Ford is a great writer, for what it's worth. He must take his place with the best of them. The Bascombe novels are important works in literary history.

The stories here envelope the reader immediately. What astounds is his feeling for the little things that give us away - the nuances of thought and speech that reveal the desperation of the individual. He's funny too. His treatment of fellow Americans met at the Eiffel Tower is classic. And his dialogue rings true - the verbal games people play to manipulate other people.

Ford is a Europhile without doubt but not afraid to portray Paris as a depressing and frustrating place. His descriptions of the city, however, make me want to go back there right now!
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By M. G. Wilson on 27 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback
Of the three novellas presented here, 'Occidentals' is the most successful. The story of a man to whom life just happens, who drifts and dreams, and whose inner fantasy world seems more real to him than any external reality. The story is set in Paris, as is part of the central character's own novel, and is left wondering if, as with that fictional work, Ford's own Paris is the product of the library rather than personal experience. However, with 'The Womaniser' also set partly in Paris, perhaps it reflects a recent holiday. And yet both this story and 'Jealous' have the feel of writing exercises rather than fully realised creations. There is nothing here as strong or as involving as 'Independence Day' or 'The Sportswriter', and those new to Ford would be better advised to start with these great novels.
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Format: Paperback
I think that "novella" is a better description than "short story" for these 3 beautiful pieces from the hand of one of my very favourite writers.

One is set in Montana and the other two in Paris, but all three are set in the human heart and in the human soul, areas that Richard Ford, through his writing,is a master at helping us to navigate and comprehend a little bit better than we could before.
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