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Woman In A Dressing Gown [DVD] [1957]


Price: £9.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
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£9.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Woman In A Dressing Gown [DVD] [1957] + Cathy Come Home [DVD] [1966]
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Product details

  • Actors: Yvonne Mitchell, Anthony Quayle, Sylvia Syms
  • Directors: J. Lee Thompson
  • Format: PAL
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Optimum Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 13 Aug. 2012
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B006C1ELTW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 30,020 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Anthony Quayle and Sylvia Syms star in this 1950s British drama about marital strife. Fed up with his wife Amy (Yvonne Mitchell)'s frumpy appearance and bad housekeeping skills, long-married Jim Preston (Quayle) begins an affair with co-worker Georgie (Sylvia Syms), who threatens to break it off unless Jim divorces his wife. Shocked and distressed by Jim's request, Amy quickly vows to change her slovenly ways, setting out to win back the man she loves, whatever it takes.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By William Taylor on 17 Aug. 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
"Woman in a Dressing Gown" has been given a superb DVD release by StudioCanal - a perfect, sharp and crystal clear image with excellent audio for the film itself, and some excellent extras including interviews with the producer and most fascinatingly Sylvia Syms, who shares her memories of making the film with us and her thoughts about her character and those of Jim (Anthony Quayle) and Amy (Yvonne Mitchell).

The film itself was quite daring in its day with the depiction of a working class man escaping the dissatisfaction with his home life through a romantic affair with a younger woman at work. Yvonne Mitchell is outstanding and painfully believable as Amy, the good natured but thoroughly disorganised wife whose life is one of continual domestic chaos. The family flat is a complete tip but she is completely oblivious to the mess surrounding her, totally willing but incapable of focusing on anything in order to achieve any end result. As Jim, Anthony Quayle gives a sympathetic portrayal of a man who still loves his wife but is finding her increasingly impossible to live with, and so has begun an affair with Georgie, a woman the complete opposite. Sylvia Syms completes the triangle, beautiful to look at and determined in her own way to have Jim for herself.

The film is really a character study of the three main protagonists and a very interesting one at that. I found I had mixed emotions for all of them, especially Amy, whose disorganisation seemed at times to be over exaggerated. My sympathies wavered all the time! The situation of the three main characters would today seem quite old-hat but not so in 1957 I suspect.

This is a terrific film, thoroughly engrossing - do yourself a treat - and buy it!!
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. J. Murray on 29 July 2012
Format: DVD
This is one of the best films involving social realism in working class relationships and won many award when released. It was recently given 5 stars by the Guardian and the Telegraph plus the subject of a favourable piece on the BBC's 'front row' programme. Ahead of it's time and a gripping drama with a fantastic cast, Anthony Quale, Yvonne Mitchell and Sylvia Sims, a great Director J. Lee Thompson and from the pen of the much loved radical writer Ted Willis. One of his finest.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Liam Bluett on 10 Jan. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a terrific movie from the UK, directed by the great J. Lee Thompson. It has a sensitive performance from Yvonne Mitchell. Sylvia Syms, at the start of her career, also gave a terrific performance. Ms Syms was one of the most beautiful British actress in films of the 1950's. Anthony Quayle is usually associated with war movies but here he is a man trapped in married life and in a dead end job. The film also features solid supporting performances from Andrew Ray and Carole Lesley. It is a gem of a movie.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By J. Rottweiller Swinburne on 3 Aug. 2012
Format: DVD
This is one of the great films of that interregnal, hard-to-define and somewhat elusive period that followed the traditional stiff-upper-lip cinema of the post-war period, but came before the new wave films of the so-called "swinging 60s", with all its connotations of female emancipation and free love (all bogus hypocritical rubbish in hindsight, of course, but let's not go there for now). It's rather like "A Kind of Loving" (made five years later, in 1962) in that it dealt with the grubby realities of life, and was thus part of the genre known as the "Kitchen Sink" drama.
The plot is simplicity itself. Jim Preston (Anthony Quayle) is the middle-aged husband of the dowdy Amy (played by Yvonne Mitchell, a now-forgotten but truly wonderful actress) who, fed up with his monotonous life, has an affair with Georgie Harlow (Sylvia Sims) and prepares to leave home for her. Amy does her best to get Jim to stay, trying to make herself glamorous in order to attract him back to the family home (she spends money she can't afford on a hairdo that is ruined by the rain), but all to no avail - he is determined to go...

It's the kind of film that it would be impossible to make now - anyone attempting to deal with the drab verities in such an unsparing way would be unable to resist lapsing into comedic parody and send-up. But it is a film, shot in grainy black-and-white, that has an unsparing honesty about it, rather like "A Kind of Loving", and it is absolutely heart-wrenching to watch. Your heart goes out to the despairing Amy as she does her sad best to try and make Jim stay, especially as he stays not because of her, but because he realises that he, too, in his way, is as drab and flattened by life as she is, and that the glamorous Georgie will not stay with him for the long-haul.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. O. Sullivan on 10 Dec. 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Agree with all the comments ..Yvonne Mitchell gives one of the truly great cinematic performances ever
Kitchens don't get messier than this
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 18 April 2015
Format: DVD
Woman in a Dressing Gown is directed by J. Lee Thompson and written by Ted Willis. It stars Yvonne Mitchell, Anthony Quayle and Sylvia Syms, music is by Louis Levy and cinematography by Gilbert Taylor.

It's something of an inauspicious title, a title hardly conducive to making this piece of film leap out at you, to shout that it's essential British cinema. How wonderful to find that not only is it a title completely befitting the material being played out, but that it is actually essential British cinema.

It's little known and very under seen, in fact myself was only introduced to it by a Canadian friend! The story centers on a London family of three, husband is away earning the corn at the office, teenage son is just starting out in life after school, and mother? She's on housewife auto-pilot, but disorganised with it. Her auto-pilot world is shaken to the core when it is revealed that husband is having an affair with his personal secretary, a smart and beautiful younger sort who is demanding that husband divorces wifey or it's all off...

It sounds very kitchen sink, but actually it's not, it's a very smartly written picture giving credence to mental illness, to the shattering blows of infidelity, of a crumbling family dynamic, a family that in truth is homespun. Ordinary? Yes, but safe as the red brick built poky flat they dwell in. We are not asked to take sides here, to chastise or judge, Thompson and his superb cast merely ask us to delve into their world, to understand it, the psychological humdrum of 50s Britain, the starkness of marriage does mean growing old together, but that nobody ever said it was going to be easy.
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