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Wolves Eat Dogs (Arkady Renko Novels) Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Abridged edition (12 Jun. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 074356765X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743567657
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 2.3 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,752,314 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Amazon Review

The latest of Smith's thrillers about honest Russian cop Arkady Renko, Wolves Eat Dogs has a memorably spooky opening as Renko prowls the apartment of one of the men who has done well out of privatization and neo-capitalism and has suddenly jumped out of a tenth floor window. The dead man's cupboard is full of salt and he was clutching a salt-shaker when he died--no-one wants to investigate madness, but Renko suspects that there is more to it than that. When the dead man's partner turns up with his throat cut in a cemetery in the Ukraine, his bosses get him out of their hair by sending him to investigate--in the overgrown deserted towns and returning woodlands around the radioactive ruins of the Chernobyl power plant. A place full of deadly legacies and ruined hopes is just the sort of place where Renko feels at home, and where secrets are as common as giant mutant catfish. The mystery is less impressive here than the atmosphere--Smith gives the attentive reader more clues than merely playing fair demands--but with atmosphere so intense that hardly matters. --Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

A brilliant return for Arkady Renko - start reading and forget about everything else till you reach the end -- Publishing News

‘this is a chilling tale of Chernobyl 20 years on' -- The Times on Saturday --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Oct. 2005
Format: Paperback
Arkady Renko returns for his fifth outing and, thank the lord, it's a better effort than Havana Bay. Personally I didn't think Renko worked as a character outside Russia, his anti-hero status just didn't add up in Cuba.
This however is class. Renko tracks the murderer of a wealthy 'new russian' businessman from Moscow's plush apartments to the radioactive villages of Chernobyl. The usual outstanding narrative from Martin Cruz Smith, plenty of dark humour and an interesting examination of the 'new russian' phenomenom. Can't recommend this book highly enough.
Welcome back Renko.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A. Ross TOP 500 REVIEWER on 26 Jun. 2006
Format: Paperback
After enjoying the two middle books in the Arkady Renko series (Gorky Park, Polar Star, Havana Bay, and Red Square) I picked up this fifth one with pretty high hopes. The story begins in roughly contemporary times with Renko still hanging on as Senior Investigator in Moscow. When a Russian bazillionaire industrialist takes a swan dive off the 10th-floor balcony of his locked ultrasecure apartment, Renko is called in to rubber stamp the apparent suicide. When the tycoon's friends and business associates all confirm the man's recent depression, and the security cameras show no intruders. However, Renko wants to know what caused the depression, and more interestingly, why one of the apartment closets is full of salt. True to form, Renko stubbornly pursues these lines of inquiry to the frustration and anger of his superiors and the chief of security for the bazillionaire's company. Soon thereafter, the bazillionaire's longtime friend and partner turns up dead in the 30-kilometer "zone of exclusion " which surrounds the Chernobyl nuclear accident site in northern Ukraine.

This provides Renko's superiors with a perfect excuse to exile him from Moscow for a while and punish him by stationing him in the highly radioactive environs of Chernobyl. This is where the book really works -- as a travelogue of Chernobyl some 15-20 years after the accident. Cruz Smith took several trips to the area to learn about the "black villages" and the lives of those who live in the contaminated area.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Leonard Fleisig TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 April 2006
Format: Paperback
On April 26th, 1986 the number 4 reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded after a planned test shutdown went seriously wrong. The subsequent release of radioactive material (cesium and strontium) is estimated to have reached levels exceeding 40 times the amount of radioactivity released by the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The short and long term effects of this explosion, particularly on the Republics of Belarus and Ukraine has been devastating. For example, the phrase "Chernobyl Necklace" refers to the ubiquitous ear-to-ear scar worn by Byelorussians and Ukrainians that have had thyroid cancer surgery. The thyroid cancer rate is estimated to be up to 2000 times greater in Belarus than in the general world population. Smith's eye for details makes note of these scars. The Chernobyl disaster has special resonance for me as I have spent five years involved with a Children of Chernobyl program that brings children from Belarus to the United States for six week health and respite visits. The dark world that Martin Cruz Smith portrays in Wolves Eat Dogs tracks remarkably well with accounts I have heard from Byelorussians and Ukrainians about life after Chernobyl. Smith made numerous trips to the exclusion zone and his investment in time and first-hand research bears fruit. It is into that dark world that fate and police work brings Inspector Arkday Renko.

I have read and enjoyed Smith's previous Renko novels. Renko's erratic career path as a police inspector has seen him survive, barely, the apparatchiks of the Soviet regime (Gorky Park). He has survived its imminent demise (Polar Star) and the emergence of bloody cowboy capitalism (Red Square). Now, in Wolves Eat Dogs, Renko must operate in a Russia dominated by an elite group of billionaire oligarchs.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Leonard Fleisig TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Nov. 2004
Format: Hardcover
I have read and enjoyed Smith's previous Renko novels. Renko's erratic career path as a police inspector has seen him survive, barely, the apparatchiks of the Soviet regime (Gorky Park). He has survived its imminent demise (Polar Star) and the emergence of bloody cowboy capitalism (Red Square). Now, in Wolves Eat Dogs, Renko must operate in a Russia dominated by an elite group of billionaire oligarchs.
The primary setting of Wolves Eats Dogs is the 30-kilometer evacuation (or exclusion) zone in the northern Ukraine, just south of Ukraine's border with Belarus, surrounding the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. On April 26th, 1986 the number 4 reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded after a planned test shutdown went seriously wrong. The subsequent release of radioactive material (including massive amounts of cesium and strontium) is estimated to have reached levels exceeding 40 times the amount of radioactivity released by the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The short and long term effects of this explosion, particularly on the Republics of Belarus and Ukraine has been devastating. For example, the phrase "Chernobyl Necklace" refers to the ubiquitous ear-to-ear scar worn by Byelorussians and Ukrainians that have had thyroid cancer surgery. The thyroid cancer rate is estimated to be up to 2000 times greater in Belarus than in the general world population. Smith's eye for details makes note of these scars. The Chernobyl disaster has special resonance for me as I have spent five years involved with a Children of Chernobyl program that brings children from Belarus to the United States for six week health and respite visits.
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