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Wolverine - Volume 1: Hunting Season (Marvel Now) (Wolverine (Marvel) (Quality Paper)) [Paperback]

Alan Davis , Paul Cornell
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
RRP: 13.50
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Product details

  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: MARVEL - US (3 Sep 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785183965
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785183969
  • Product Dimensions: 25.4 x 16.5 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 164,520 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Wolverine: Hunting Season (Marvel Now) Volume 1 Originally published in magazine form as Wolverine #1-6. Full description

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
I normally love the stuff Paul Cornell writes, this is the guy that gave us the classic Dr. Who episodes "Father's Day", "Human Nature" and "Family of Blood", all highly emotional and epoch changing episodes.

That is not what you get with this Wolverine story.

There is a definite feeling of "tell" and not "show" throughout, the only real emotion I got was Wolverine's aversion to going berserker and not killing. But this is cast aside when the plot demands he "does what he does best", so there is a very inconsistent tone to the story.

SPOILER ALERT He happily kills a father in the first chapter, even though it's pretty obvious the man is possessed, but then decides not to kill his son when he becomes possessed by the same entity? Why? Is a little boy's life more sacred than a grown man's? He tells the boy he had no choice, when he could have easily used a disabling blow rather than slice and dice the poor bloke. It smacks of "Oh, we can't possibly harm the boy, what would the senior management think, let alone the general public, let's draw a line in the sand and not touch the child." Self censorship is actually even worse than if an editor came and demanded changes, which does not seem the case here.

There is also an introduction (to me anyway) of a new group that Wolverine now belongs to/associates with in a bar, but these characters are thinly veiled stereotypes of the back up crew of many a superhero (the Fixer, the Brains, the Geeky One etc.), they don't really seem to serve any purpose other than to show Logan is really just a "regular Joe" when he is not hanging out with the X-Men, The Avengers and all the other superhero groups in the Marvel Universe.

And then there is Nick Fury v.02!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hunt elsewhere 9 Nov 2013
By Noel TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
What is it about Wolverine that makes him such a difficult character to get right? He's great in ensemble series like Wolverine and the X-Men, the Avengers, and various other team books, but put him on his own and things get very shaky - there are precious few Wolverine books that are actually any good, and Wolverine: Hunting Season is definitely not one of them.

An alien gun is possessing people and forcing them to kill - enter Wolverine as he begins slaughtering them in a vague attempt to figure out this new threat. And why is Uatu the Watcher suddenly appearing?

The Marvel NOW! Wolverine series should be way better than this as he's such a popular character, and Paul Cornell's writing it - but for many reasons, it's a very poor book. The enemy is terrible - an invisible being that inhabits people? Hmm... nope. An alien gun? ... nope. No, I'm not interested in any of this so far. But that's the whole book! Like so many Marvel titles these days, the already-anaemic story gets stretched to 6 issues not for narrative purposes but for financial reasons - this book could've been an ok two-parter but 6 issues? It's so boring!

Cornell seems to think Wolverine isn't interesting enough on his own and introduces maybe the most boring backup team seen since Marvel's Agents of SHIELD premiered. Four nondescript middle-aged white people with tablets sitting in a pub are Logan's tech squad, sending him data and doing other dreary computer stuff that's not at all interesting to read. They couldn't have an X-Man like Beast or Doop or any character that's more interesting than a group of nobodies do this stuff?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Gareth Simon TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
This really is a fun, entertaining, and relatively light-hearted Wolverine adventure - and the other side probably end up killing more people than he does. The story runs through issues #1-6 of Wolverine Volume 5, and is collected as Wolverine - Volume 1: Hunting Season (Marvel Now) (Wolverine (Marvel) (Quality Paper)). I say light hearted, though we have a mysterious force taking over ordinary humans and committing mass murders, and Wolverine attempts to track down the source, aided by Nick Fury, Agent of SHIELD - "You always going to call me that?" - the son of Nick Fury (former) Director of SHIELD, and a whole new group of supporting characters - at least, I possibly recognise only one of them, and I thought he was dead, so it might be a replacement. Anyway, we get to play with a submersible SHIELD helicarrier, visit another dimension, and see Wolverine lose his [spoiler] before we get to the continued next issue/volume fade to black scene... Now, the main story is clearly resolved, though we are left with the [spoiler] to carry us over into the next volume, and it is a very fast moving story, as the opening situation takes two issues of an almost continuous chase scene to resolve, before the Watcher shows up. It might be relatively light hearted, but it is serious, and I'm not even sure if it might even turn into one of those messed-up future adventures, or whether that was dealt with. I said it was fast-moving. Anyway (again), it is a really-really fast moving and entertaining adventure, and, for a Wolverine story, relatively light-hearted, as it is Paul Cornell and Alan Davis collaboration.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hunt elsewhere 9 Nov 2013
By Noel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
What is it about Wolverine that makes him such a difficult character to get right? He's great in ensemble series like Wolverine and the X-Men, the Avengers, and various other team books, but put him on his own and things get very shaky - there are precious few Wolverine books that are actually any good, and Wolverine: Hunting Season is definitely not one of them.

An alien gun is possessing people and forcing them to kill - enter Wolverine as he begins slaughtering them in a vague attempt to figure out this new threat. And why is Uatu the Watcher suddenly appearing?

The Marvel NOW! Wolverine series should be way better than this as he's such a popular character, and Paul Cornell's writing it - but for many reasons, it's a very poor book. The enemy is terrible - an invisible being that inhabits people? Hmm... nope. An alien gun? ... nope. No, I'm not interested in any of this so far. But that's the whole book! Like so many Marvel titles these days, the already-anaemic story gets stretched to 6 issues not for narrative purposes but for financial reasons - this book could've been an ok two-parter but 6 issues? It's so boring!

Cornell seems to think Wolverine isn't interesting enough on his own and introduces maybe the most boring backup team seen since Marvel's Agents of SHIELD premiered. Four nondescript middle-aged white people with tablets sitting in a pub are Logan's tech squad, sending him data and doing other dreary computer stuff that's not at all interesting to read. They couldn't have an X-Man like Beast or Doop or any character that's more interesting than a group of nobodies do this stuff?

I get the feeling Marvel editorial are trying to make Wolverine more palatable to a larger audience because he keeps saying that he wants to control his berserker rage - except that doesn't last very long. Once he encounters innocent people possessed with this alien wielding the gun, he has no problem gutting them but stops when the alien possesses a kid. Why kill grown-ups so easily but draw the line at kids? Audience reaction - there's nothing heroic about killing kids (there's nothing heroic about killing innocent people but it's more heinous to kill kids) and Marvel would like Wolverine to be seen in a better light, despite that going against his pre-established character (and he's killed kids before). So that's an irksome development in this book.

Mediocre writing and terrible story aside, the one thing that saves the book is Alan Davis' art who at least makes the Hunting Season arc look great. Joined by frequent collaborator, Mark Farmer, who inks his pencils, the first four issues' artwork is the best thing about this entire book. Unfortunately the last two issues are drawn by someone called Mirco Pierdeferici whose work is just scratchy and messy in comparison.

This Wolverine book is terrible! If you're looking for better Wolverine books, check out Mark Millar's Enemy of the State or Old Man Logan, or Jason Aaron's Wolverine: Weapon X.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A cool character in an OK story in a poorly and unneeded re-launch... 2 Feb 2014
By N. Beitler - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Title: Wolverine Vol 1: Hunting Season
Publisher: Marvel
Writer: Paul Cornell
Artists: Alan Davis, Mirco Pierfederici (pencils), Mark Farmer, Karl Kesel, Zach Fischer (inks), (Matt Hollingsworth, Andres Mossa colors), Alan Davis, Mark Farmer, Matt Hollingsworth (covers)
Collects: Wolverine #1-6
Price: $17.99

Well, here we go… Yet another Wolverine re-launch. In my opinion, this is just really stupid. I don’t understand the reasoning behind re-setting the numbering back to a #1 issue every time a book sees the departure of a long-time writer. Sure, the readers are going to see a shift in direction and story-telling, but why re-number the book? Everyone knows that the book will shift back to its original numbering system any time it reaches a “milestone” issue, such as 200 or 250 or 300 or whatever. It’s nonsense like this that makes me really glad I am no longer a collector of comic books. But, I digress…

When I heard that Paul Cornell was going to take over as the writer of this book, I was both relieved and disappointed. I was relieved that Jason Aaron was finally off this title. He wrote around fifty issues of Wolverine, and of those I probably approved of about three of them. Most of his work on this title was rubbish. On the other hand, I can’t say that I’ve been overly impressed with anything Paul Cornell has written in the past few years. So, it’s safe to say that I really wasn’t expecting great things from him on this title, either.

Having read the book, I can say that the writing was a bit better than I expected it to be. It was nothing flashy, shocking, or overly memorable, but it was OK – which is to say that it was better than I expected. Cornell doesn’t break any new ground, here, but tells a decent Wolverine story.

It’s nice to see Alan Davis working on a Marvel title again. I don’t know if it’s just me or what, but it seems like he has not been working for Marvel for some years, now. As a kid growing up, it was easy to find his artwork on Marvel titles nearly every month. His style is one that is pretty clean and recognizable, and reading this book brought back many memories of stories I had read in my younger years. The other artist on this book – Mirco Pierfederici – is not an artist I am familiar with. I gathered from the book’s notes that he has illustrated the X-Men Legacy book at some point, but that isn’t a title I am a reader of. His art style was not too dissimilar to that of Davis, which made for a nice flow to the book. Colors and inks on the book were fine.

Though there is nothing particularly WRONG with this book, there isn’t anything particularly outstanding, either. As far as book re-launches go, this one starts with a whimper. At least the price on this book isn't as shockingly high as on some other Marvel books...

Writing: 7/10
Artwork: 7/10
Cool Factor: 4/10
Value: 8/10

Overall: 6.5/10
3.0 out of 5 stars Almost Good 18 Mar 2014
By G. YEO - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This kept me reading until the ending when an inexplicable resolution / explanation kicked in and I went "Huh? What was that about?" Apart from that, it's not a bad book with an intriguing set up. But it does veer a little off Wolverine territory - probably a little less primal and intense to what we're used to reading. The ending leads into another interesting chapter of Logan, but let's see if it works out well!
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Art, but the story? ehhh 4 Sep 2013
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
If you love the artwork of Alan Davis you will be marginally happy. He only draws 4 of the 6 issues.

As for the story? I was not impressed.

I give it 2.5 Stars, which gets rounded to 3 on the Amazon scale.
4 Stars for the art (it would have been 5 if all 6 issues were done by Davis)
1 Star for the story.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 7.5/10 1 Feb 2014
By Bastion Drake - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
What's interesting about this new series is that it is actually putting Wolverine (the loner) alone. The vast majority of stories place him as part of a team wether that be the X-Men, X-Force, the Avengers, or principle of a school. It's great to have a solo variant of his world even if it isn't the greatest adventure of his life. This was a very enjoyable book. I can't say that it was outstanding but the art was great, the plot was good enough and I can never get enough Wolverine so If you're like me you'l like it.
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