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Wolf: Jack Caffery series 7 Hardcover – 24 Apr 2014


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Press (24 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0593068181
  • ISBN-13: 978-0593068182
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 3.7 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (257 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,142 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Mo Hayder has written some of the most terrifying crime thrillers you will ever read. Her first novel, Birdman, was hailed as a 'first-class shocker' by the Guardian and her follow-up, The Treatment was voted by the Times one of 'the top ten most scary thrillers ever written'. Mo's books are 100% authentic, drawing on her long research association with several UK police forces and on her personal encounters with criminals and prostitutes. She left school at 15 and has worked as a barmaid, security guard, English teacher, and even a hostess in a Tokyo club.

She has an MA in film making from the American University in Washington DC and an MA in creative writing from Bath Spa University. She now lives in England's West Country and is a full-time writer. For more information on Mo Hayder and her books, see her website at www.mohayder.net.

Product Description

Review

"Hayder keeps you guessing adroitly - and has in Caffrey, a maverick cop so fascinatingly weird that he makes Ian Rankin's Rebus seems a stolid conformist" (Sunday Times, Culture)

"Builds to its mesmerising climax with a brilliantly paced sense of menace. Masterful" (Sunday Mirror)

Book Description

The sensational new Jack Caffery thriller. Who's afraid?

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By JK TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The 7th novel in the Jack Caffrey series and unfortunately he's missing for large chunks of his own story and that's a shame.

The plot is certainly dark and violent enough, plenty of that surreal creepiness Mo Hayder's so good at, but Wolf reads like two separate stories almost until the end with very little to tie the two parts together.

On one hand Caffrey's out there relying on the brilliantly evoked Walking Man, a regular throughout the series, to help him finally solve the riddle of his brother's death. On the other hand there's a family suffering extreme psychological torture at the hands of some very dubious characters while a decidedly nasty serial killer is on the prowl...or is he?. Although Caffrey's drawn towards the mystery of the family it's slow going and some of the links are stretched to breaking point.

Mo is at her best when she's dealing with Caffrey. When he features in the novel she hits her stride and Wolf becomes all I expect from her. She's not managed the story of the family quite so well. It begins strongly, ramps up to exceptional in places, but then loses it's way and becomes less and less believable. I'd switched off to everything apart from Caffrey before the end.

What is perfect in this novel is the story of a little dog. I can't say much more without leaving spoilers. The way Mo uses Bear to create horror and empathy is absolutely spot on and I fell in love with that little character.

Wolf is a good read but it's bumpy and I missed Flea Marley and her eerie underwater search scenes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By aNic on 5 Jun. 2014
Format: Hardcover
A brilliant, well written and truly terrifying thriller. I would say this is the third best Hayder, after Birdman and The Treatment, and it certainly reads like a continuation of those novels rather than the Ritual/Skin era. Ritual and Skin left me cold to be honest, as did the character of Flea Marley, so her backseat role in Wolf suited me well. The events of the Kitson case are mentioned and dealt with very well, but it's the events of the first two novels that take over the Caffrey sections of Wolf; he finally finds out what happened to Ewan, the heartbreaking story thread of The Treatment. This discovery, at the every end of the novel, is sure to dominate the next stage in the Caffrey story.
The main plot centres on a home invasion, a family of 3 kept prisoner and tortured in their own home. At first it appears the culprit is obvious - the return of a known local psychopath, thought to be locked up - but the story soon takes terrifying twists and turns. The torture scenes are gruesome, disturbing and genuinely upsetting - not for the faint hearted.
The only aspect of the story that bugged me was Lucia. To have the goth, the Marilyn Manson fan, the 'alternative' dresser, turn out to be a parent-hating evil witch was just far too clichéd for me and really didn't sit well.
Other than that, I found it to be Hayder at her best - better than she has been for years.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By BookBunny on 1 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wolf is Mo Hayder's seventh Jack Caffery book and is as amazing as all the previous books in the series. Jack is still searching for his brother's remains and this book finally gives closure to it at the end of the book. He is unwillingly drawn into looking for the owners of a hurt dog on the behest of The Walking Man in return for vital information. Concurrently, we are drawn into the abduction and imprisonment of the Anchor-Ferrers family in their remote mansion in the countryside. They are subjected to unthinkable mental torture and it becomes clear that the dog belongs to this family. Each page builds tension and the characters' fear and despair almost becomes tangible.
The book is gory and fast paced as one would expect from Mo Hayder's work. It's a fantastic read and I would highly recommend this to anyone who loves a good thriller series. Although it can be enjoyed as a standalone, it's by far more beneficial to read all the books in the series. I cannot wait for the next instalment. Thanks Mo Hayder for an awesome read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Willow on 1 July 2014
Format: Hardcover
I was disappointed with this latest offering from Mo Hayder. A 'Jack Caffery series' billing it says but in reality our chief protagonist plays only a small part for much of the book; relegated to a hard drinking, troubled dog minder. Instead we are forced to endure a dull tedious tale about the Anchor-Ferrers; a family singled out by two equally unimpressive and unimaginative characters who's intention is to make their lives a misery by keeping them locked up in separate rooms, where to be honest nothing much happens.

The pace is painfully slow, so take my advice and just skip to the last 30 pages or so where the ‘action,’ and one or two questions are answered - sort of.
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By FictionFan TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 12 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Following heart surgery, Oliver Anchor-Ferrars is delighted to get down to his country house to relax and recuperate. He and his wife, Matilda, have brought their grownup daughter, Lucia, with them. Lucia has never recovered from the trauma of the murder of her ex-boyfriend and his new girlfriend when she was young, and is back living with her parents after yet another job and relationship breakdown. But the country idyll is destroyed when two men come into their home, take the family captive and begin a long-drawn out episode of torture and humiliation...

Mo Hayder is one of those popular authors whose books are always billed as 'heart-stopping', 'pulse-racing', 'terrifying', etc. To be honest, I've always thought the blurbs make them look rather graphic, but decided it was time to at least try one. I rather wish I hadn't. I realise lots of people love Hayder and clearly in the end taste is always subjective. But while I felt there was some skill in the basic writing and pacing of the book, the plot, which started out fairly well, became increasingly inconsistent and unbelievable as the book wore on till, quite frankly, it reached the point of absurdity in the end. And I fear the repeated twists and turns played such havoc with the characterisation that by the end the only believable character in the house was Matilda - the rest had had their personalities so clumsily changed so often throughout the course of the book that they had lost all credibility.

The detective, DI Jack Caffrey, is of course an angst-ridden loner, damaged by his past - a maverick who in this book at least is working entirely outside the structure of the job on his own personal vendetta, hampered on occasion by his over-indulgence in alcohol.
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