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With Malice: Lee Harvey Oswald and the Murder of Officer J. D. Tippit Hardcover – Nov 1998


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 702 pages
  • Publisher: Oak Cliff Press (Nov. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0966270975
  • ISBN-13: 978-0966270976
  • Product Dimensions: 24.7 x 16.3 x 5.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 707,324 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Nov. 1998
Format: Hardcover
While Dale Myers' explores a neglected aspect of the assassination of President Kennedy, his investigation stops short on a number of lines of inquiry that are extremely significant, and so he fails in his task of exposing the total truth. Like CBS, the HSCA, and the FBI before him, Myers traces the license plate of the car seen with Oswald driving near the scene of Tippit's murder to Tippit's best friend Carl Mather. He doesn't tell the reader that Mather's alibi was that at the time of the assassination and murder of Tippit he was at work at Collins Radio. Nor does he convey, and he must have known, that Collins was actively engaged in anti-Castro Cuban activities through its ownership of the ship Rex, which on Nov. 1, 1963 deposited a team of assassins in Cuba. "This is one story that may never have survived had the license number T.F. White supplied not been linked to Tippit through Mathers. The resulting investigation clearly shows that the Mathers were not involved,and that White was less than sure of the information he was supplying than the investigators had been led to believe. Perhaps, that explains White's reluctance to come forward." (With Malace p. 333) Wes Wise, the reporter who obtained the license number from White, in no uncertain terms (HSCA Reports - "The Wise Allegation"), said that he had to use all the powers of persuasion at his disposal because White was afraid and not because he was unsure of his facts. Everyone who has gone down this road before has stopped at Carl Mather's front door and not gone the Collins Radio Route, which I believe is the codex of the Rosetta Stone that helps solve the mystery. Myers has left it for others to investigate that line of inquiry, so his work is not totally comprehensive.Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover
It might be worth noting that any criticism of incompleteness in this book is addressed somewhat emotionally overcharged at the blog [...]
It's a shame that great research has to be mared by emotional outbursts. I can understand his frustration, but it doesn't help the argument. Like in most criminal cases the drive towards the perpetrators guilt vs the drive to exhaunorate leaves the truth in limbo. The raw evidence leaves room for interpretation, speculation and discussion. I wish people would be able to leave it at that, but that does not seem to be in our nature.
In 1963 the police force of Dallas was by modern standards nothing short of incompetent. Their inability to maintain a chain of evidence was legendary. With this in mind this book is an impressive reconstruction of the evidence. Well worth a read. Conclusions are drawn. You may or may not agree with them.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Collins on 2 Feb. 2007
Format: Hardcover
The Tippit murder has received less than the attention it probably deserves in the published body of work on the Kennedy assassination. Described as the Rosetta Stone of the case, one asks that if it were Oswald who shot Tippit, does it really indicate that Oswald shot the President or that he was implicated ? The answer to that question is almost certainly yes. The other side of the coin is of course, if some else shot Tippit and the DPD concluded Oswald did it, then there are severe consequences for the whole case.

This book sets out to establish that Oswald was at the scene of the murder of Tippit and makes a good job of that aim. If you believe Oswald shot Kennedy or was involved in some way, you will have an easier job of accepting his guilt in the Tippit shooting. If however you believe Kennedy was shot by other assassins, you will no doubt tend to look for other assassins in the Tippit case. This book goes a long way to providing a reasonably balanced case history on the subject and may help you make up your mind. In that sense it is to be thoroughly recommended.

On first appearance this book impresses - it is a heavy weight for sure. However as has been pointed out in other reviews, a significant chunk of the book is given over to appendices and notes and is therefore not quite as comprehensive as one might think. Myers is well known for his work on animating the Zapruder film and as serious assassination researcher. So you can depend on an informed view in this book - even if you disagree with his conclusion that Oswald alone shot Tippit. However in the context of what is printed in the book, it is difficult to accept Oswald's innocence - you need to go elsewhere to find more compelling reasons to doubt his guilt.

Myers is worth reading. If you are an assassination researcher, this book is a must have. If you are new to the case, this book should be on your list.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By I. S. Macarthur on 2 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Awful hagiography of a deeply flawed cop who was up to his neck in the conspiracy. Repetitive, dull and misleading.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Barry Ryder on 8 Dec. 2009
Format: Hardcover
This hard-to-find book really is the definitive work on the murder of J. D. Tippit.

For those who are genuinely interested in the truth about the murder of Police Officer J. D. Tippit and its direct connection to the JFK assassination, this 500 (and some) page investigation is all you will ever need.

The book is rigorous, thorough and lavishly illustrated.
Quite simply, if you can read this from beginning to end and still doubt Oswald's guilt in this brave man's murder, then you must be in some strange kind of 'denial'.

The author presents the eye-witness testimony and the irrefutable ballistics evidence which show - beyond any shadow of a doubt - that Lee Oswald, alone and unaided shot Officer Tippit to death.

In a sense, this truly was an open-and-shut-case. Only the obfuscation of the conspiracy theorist's over the years has kept this debate alive.

Myers tackles all the hokum and guff that's been churned up over time by those who would seek to exonerate a `cop-killer', and he succeeds in debunking it all; not with counter-theories, but with facts!
His analysis and conclusions of the `Oswald wallet found at the scene' allegation are especially interesting.

There are some writers who will seek to convince the unwitting reader that Officer Tippit was actually part of `the conspiracy' to murder JFK. That's pretty awful. This book is the best antidote for such tripe. Get a copy if you possibly can.

Barry Ryder
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