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Witch's Honour
 
 

Witch's Honour [Kindle Edition]

Jan Siegel
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)

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Amazon.co.uk Review

Magic has a price and in Witch’s Honour Jan Siegel’s heroine, Fern, finds herself trapped in situations where she has to pay that price one way or another. The witch Morgus has survived their earlier confrontation--regenerated and rejuvenated--and has come back to the fields we know to seek revenge and power.

Unlike the dark godling Azmordis, whose dark pacts and conventions Fern has dreams about, Morgus is a being who knows no limits and understands no rules. She attracts Fern’s attention through a gratuitous act of cruelty, plunging a carelessly offending rich girl into the sort of coma-dream from which she once drew Fern, and by casting the presiding spirits of an old house into the Abyss between worlds.

Siegel has a poetic understanding of power and its costs--Fern and her allies are joined in their fight with Morgus by Lucas, brother to the sleeping Dana, and a man whom Fern feels she has met before. Full of set pieces of genuine beauty and terror--Siegel does Morgus’s giant spider servitor with the same skill that she created a dragon and a unicorn in earlier books. This is an admirable conclusion to an impressive fantasy trilogy.--Roz Kaveney

Amazon Review

Magic has a price and in Witch’s Honour Jan Siegel’s heroine, Fern, finds herself trapped in situations where she has to pay that price one way or another. The witch Morgus has survived their earlier confrontation--regenerated and rejuvenated--and has come back to the fields we know to seek revenge and power.

Unlike the dark godling Azmordis, whose dark pacts and conventions Fern has dreams about, Morgus is a being who knows no limits and understands no rules. She attracts Fern’s attention through a gratuitous act of cruelty, plunging a carelessly offending rich girl into the sort of coma-dream from which she once drew Fern, and by casting the presiding spirits of an old house into the Abyss between worlds.

Siegel has a poetic understanding of power and its costs--Fern and her allies are joined in their fight with Morgus by Lucas, brother to the sleeping Dana, and a man whom Fern feels she has met before. Full of set pieces of genuine beauty and terror--Siegel does Morgus’s giant spider servitor with the same skill that she created a dragon and a unicorn in earlier books. This is an admirable conclusion to an impressive fantasy trilogy.--Roz Kaveney


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 500 KB
  • Print Length: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (20 July 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002RI9F6S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #217,672 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not convinced 21 July 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I got this the day it became available and settled down to read it immediately ... and I didn't get the kick I'd been anticipating. Maybe I expected too much. We're back with the familiar characters from the first two novels and the publicity material for the book suggests that we are to expect a climactic final resolution to the story, but it doesn't seem to work and despite some well worked scenes it sometimes seems a bit cursory as though the author was in a hurry to finish it. I won't give away the conclusion except to say that after some decent build up work I was left thinking "what? is that it?" and feeling somewhat short-changed. The conclusion has a logic about it, but it is not satisfactory dramatically and feels rushed. On the other hand, although this is billed as a trilogy, and this is the third part, it is set up nicely for a further installment if the author feels so inclined.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hell hath no fury like a woman scourned... 29 Mar 2004
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The third book of a story began in Prospero's Children and continued in The Dragon Charmer.
The first book introduced us to a teenage girl, Fern, who discovers she has magical powers which link back to a stone in doomed Atlantis.
The second book follows her after she's grown, on the eve of her wedding, and how she is abducted by Morgus, a witch from Arthurian mythology, and trained in witchcraft. But Fern's power is too strong and she escapes leaving Morgus for dead.
In witchcraft things are never as they seem and Morgus is back, invicible, and wants Fern dead.
This book is far quicker paced than the other two and I found it a far more riveting read. It does focus more on Fern and, sadly, doesn't have as much about the mysterious Ragginbone or his past history (but maybe Jan will write about this in another book).
Without giving anything away about the story I don't consider this the closing part of a trilogy. Merely the conclusion of the story for now. It certainly wasn't the ending I was expecting and it's one that leaves me waiting eagerly for a fourth book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Why did I wait so long to read this book? 26 Feb 2004
Format:Hardcover
In Witch's Honour Jan Siegel brings forth her fantasy heroine Fern Capel, a modern day witch, for the third and final time. A couple of years has passed since the events of The Dragon Charmer, and the world is about to enter a new millennium. Fern is having nightmares signifying that the Old Spirit Azmordis is not yet done with her, and from the werefolk she learns of the arrival of a witch with powers not seen in a long time. Could it be her old enemy Morgus that has returned to the realm of the living?
The first book starring Fern, Prospero's Children, reminded me somewhat of classic British fantasy tales like The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis and The Dark is Rising sequence by Susan Cooper where kids of our time suddenly find portals to magical realms or learn that magic exists in our world. It had an atmosphere of innocence and "all will be well in the end". Now that Fern is a thirty year old woman and working in the PR business in the big city Siegel has adjusted her writing accordingly. The atmosphere in Witch's Honour is much darker and there is a cynical touch to the prose that wasn't apparent in Prospero's Children.
However, some of the supporting characters bring back a bit of the sense of "easy adventure" from the old days. Will, Fern's brother, is still sometimes playing the part as easygoing side-kick, and Ragginbone does his best to act as Fern's mentor and friend in Gandalf-style. But the person who most easily lightens the mood is Bradachin, a house-goblin with a weakness for whiskey and an almost incomprehensible Scottish accent.
There is one problem with the writing though. Almost the whole book is written in a third person narrative, but Siegel has chosen to let one of the characters present herself in first person.
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