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Witches Hats & Painted Chariots: The Incredible String Band and the 5,000 Layers of Psychedelic Folk Music Paperback – Illustrated, 6 Jun 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Volcano Publishing (6 Jun. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0957365756
  • ISBN-13: 978-0957365759
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 0.8 x 29.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 307,791 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

Witches Hats & Painted Chariots is also a compendium this time from the Shindig! editors, Jon Mills and Andy Morten. Essentially a special edition of the magazine, a one-off for the post-Green Man generation, beautifully designed, with an abundance of suitably curly fonts, marbling and art nouveau borders. New interviews with the main players (Robin Williamson, Mike Heron, Clive Palmer) appear alongside articles about both the String Band and various acid-folk names, including Dr Strangely Strange, Forest, Comus, Dando Shaft, Heron (and yes, The Wicker Man). If the likes of Anne Briggs and Shirley Collins find themselves perplexed at the acid tag, well, that's retrospective reassignment for you. For newcomers to the ISB and the whole malarky, this is properly good. It's a pretty great addition to the collections of long-term fans too, while hopeless obsessives will enjoy basking in the warm glow of pathetically smug satisfaction that comes from mentally ticking-off all the records in the Top 20 essential 'acid-folk', list. Anyone fancy watching The Wicker Man director's cut DVD and listening to Hangman's? --fRoots Magazine

Outerspace, innerspace and urbanspace - all these areas have been explored by space-rock, a nebulous term covering musique concrete, blanga , post-punk, and other sub-genres where the distortion is turned up and the electronics are set to stun. In this chunky, colourful A4-format dossier, Captain Matthews and the Shindig! crew chart the multi-armed nebula that spirals out from the Big Bang that fused avant-garde art music, the space race, sci-fi and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. The guiding stars along the journey are Delia Derbyshire and Hawkwind, both the subject of informative articles in their own right, and constantly popping up with reference to contemporaries and later visionaries. From pioneers like Pink Floyd, Amon Duul ll and Gong, through off-shoots and followers Tim Blake, Ozric Tentacles and Omnia Opera, to current contenders Sendelica and Vibravoid, the gang s all here.Well, nearly all here: Here & Now and Grobschnitt are notable by their absence, but we re always going to disagree on some of the details. All in all, though, this is one of the best overviews of the genre to date, and I d love to see Matthews, who clearly has both knowledge and enthusiasm, go on to produce a weighty book on the subject. --R2 Magazine

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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By J. R. P. Wigman on 25 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I pre-ordered this seemingly quite appealing magazine and had to wait a long time for it to arrive, and when it did I was a bit surprised, perhaps unjustly, discovering that it was not so much a book as a lavish magazine dedicated to discussing the ISB and other associated bands and solo artists. It was a feast of recognition, of course - alongside one to two page elaborations on every ISB record and a few early Heron and Williamson solo records, there are 2-4 page articles about Dr Strangely Strange, COB, Forest, Dando Shaft, Anne Briggs, Comus, Spirogyra and a few others, as well as an article about the (music of the film) 'The Wicker Man', which I would not have included as it's a bit of an oddity here (and a decidedly flawed film).

Practically all artists discussed here are well represented in my lp and cd collection and it was really nice to get some more background information about a few of them. But quite often, especially with regards to the ISB, I didn't really read anything I didn't already know, and its content even shows that it's most certainly not up to date as the article about Williamson's solo career tells us that 'The Iron Stone'' is his latest solo album - which is quite ridiculous as that album was released in 2006 (!) and at least two albums have been released on the Quadrant label since.

"Witches Hats & Painted Chariots" is a very well-presented and colourful music magazine, which I read with pleasure, but it's arguably on the shallow side, not up to date and not stating anything new. It's likely to appeal die hard fans of the ISB and acid folk in general (like me) and young people starting out in the field of acid/nu/new folk, providing them with useful information about some key players in the classic acid folk scene, but of no great interest.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By james blatchley on 6 Jun. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An even better read than the description suggested. I highly recommend the book even if you think you know all about ISB.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
lavish music magazine ISB special 26 Sept. 2013
By J. R. P. Wigman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I pre-ordered this seemingly quite appealing magazine and had to wait a long time for it to arrive, and when it did I was a bit surprised, perhaps unjustly, discovering that it was not so much a book as a lavish magazine dedicated to discussing the ISB and other associated bands and solo artists. It was a feast of recognition, of course - alongside one to two page elaborations on every ISB record and a few early Heron and Williamson solo records, there are 2-4 page articles about Dr Strangely Strange, COB, Forest, Dando Shaft, Anne Briggs, Comus, Spirogyra and a few others, as well as an article about the (music of the film) 'The Wicker Man', which I would not have included as it's a bit of an oddity here (and a decidedly flawed film).

Practically all artists discussed here are well represented in my lp and cd collection and it was really nice to get some more background information about a few of them. But quite often, especially with regards to the ISB, I didn't really read anything I didn't already know, and its content even shows that it's most certainly not up to date as the article about Williamson's solo career is trying to make us to believe that 'The Iron Stone' is his latest solo album - which is quite ridiculous as that album was released in 2006 (!) and at least two albums have been released on the Quadrant label since.

"Witches Hats & Painted Chariots" is a very well-presented and colourful music magazine, which I read with pleasure, but it's arguably on the shallow side, not up to date and not stating anything new. It's likely to appeal die hard fans of the ISB and acid folk in general (like me) and young people starting out in the field of acid/nu/new folk, providing them with useful information about some key players in the classic acid folk scene.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
review of great book 13 Aug. 2013
By Rick Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love Shindig magazine, and this book clearly is a labor of love by some of th magazine's writers. The layout is great, the photos are wonderful. I really enjoyed this book.
Four Stars 5 Jan. 2015
By Aldous Tzu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Pretty cool.
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