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Winter's Bone Paperback – 12 Jul 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Sceptre (12 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340897996
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340897980
  • ASIN: 0340897988
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 73,073 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dan Woodrell comes from a long line of Ozarkers that stretch back before the Civil War. A high school dropout he joined the marine corps at 17. The military and he saw things differently. A period of post military drifting ended up at the University of Kansas and a Michener fellowship at the Iowa Writers School, where he was definitely the odd man out.

He is the author of eight novels including Under the Bright Lights, Muscle for the Wing, The Ones You Do, Ride With the Devil, Woe To Live On, Give Us A Kiss, Tomato Red and The Death Of Sweet Mister. He lives in West Plains, Missouri.

Critical Acclaim for Daniel Woodrell

"...Daniel Woodrell is a storyteller of bristling imagination and muscular prose, who uses the poetically profane language of the trailerpark to wicked effect..." - Sara Paretsky, Bizarre

"...Daniel Woodrell is stone brilliant ... a bayou Dutch Leonard steeped in rich Louisiana language..." - James Ellroy,

"...Daniel Woodrell is one of the most exciting writers I've discovered in a long time..." - Val McDermid, Manchester Evening News

Product Description

Review

It brings us all the satisfactions of crime thriller and mystery...The beauty lies in the loveable and wholly believable character of Ree (Guardian)

A suspicion grows that you are reading the sort of book D.B.C Pierre's Vernon God Little might have been, had it been five times as keenly observed and deeply felt (The Times)

'Woodrell is a marvellous writer' (Roddy Doyle)

'Woodrell throws down sentences that will leave you amazed.' (Charles Frazier)

'Reading this will make you feel that you walk on very, very thin ice, and know that chaos is very, very close. Such knowledge has many consequences, one of them is exhilaration.' (Niall Griffiths, Observer)

'Brutal, violent and completely gripping' (Independent on Sunday )

Book Description

'He belongs in the forefront of American fiction' John Williams, Independent

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Forester on 18 Feb 2007
Format: Hardcover
A really great novel from a too little known American author. It is easy to read with the feeling and pace of a thriller, however the dark hills and woods of the Ozark mountains give this novel an edgy maleovolent feel. Ree is a great heroine, tough but not macho, and her search for truth against a backdrop of ancient feuds and tensions makes the book hard to put down. Woodrell is an Ozark native and paints a vivid picture of the bits of the U.S. that we don't often see. A story that stays with you long after you've reached the climatic bitter sweet ending.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Twig on 26 Jan 2008
Format: Paperback
Everything about this novel is right. Character, setting, dialogue, and the deceptively simple plot that starts with so innocuous a premiss and builds to its shocking, yet inevitable, conclusion.

Brutality. Tenderness. Redemption... It's all here, and written in language so precise, yet so emotionally evocative, that each sentence is a joy to read. I have always liked Daniel Woodrell's fiction, but in this, his latest work, he has proved himself to be up there with the greats. Quite simply, he never once puts a foot wrong.

Read Winter's Bone. It is the work of a superb author at the peak of his already considerable powers.
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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Jaybird on 13 April 2007
Format: Hardcover
Set amongst poor white trash in the Ozark Hills, Winter's Bone is an extraordinary book. It is the story of Ree Dolly, a teenage girl, whose father is in and out of prison and whose mother has given up. Ree looks after her younger siblings, finding food to put on the table and energy to cook it.

The story follows her search for her father after he jumps bail, having put the family home up as security. Ree has to face down hard men and tough women, uncover family secrets and seek out the truth in her quest.

The book is incredibly atmospheric, with rounded characters and plot that is never stretched, but retains its tension throughout. This is not an easy read, emotionally; the violence can be graphic and the poverty grinding, but it is absolutely worth it.

Woodrell knows his territory intimately; he lives in the Ozarks. That comes through on every page, with an extraordinary sense of landscape. He is also one of the few male authors who can write female characters as well as he writes men. In the end it is that intimacy, that tenderness, with the hills, with the characters, even with the violence, that lifts this book above the ordinary.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By BigRich on 3 Oct 2010
Format: Paperback
The first thing that struck me about this book when i received it was how short it is. At just shy of 200 pages it seemed a little "lightweight". Having now completed reading it i can say with conviction that there's nothing lightweight about this novel set in backwoods-and some would say backwards- America. It gets you by the scruff of the neck from page 1 and doesnt let go til it's all over. The leaness of the book you discover is down to Woodrell's uncanny ability to paint a vivid picture of the places and the characters in a few sentences or so. Where some authors give you page after page of endless descriptive detail, DW cleverly manages to convey his story with a sharp, punchy writing style that while cutting to the chase gives you a real feel for the characters and the setting (the Ozark Hills, which i've never heard of but can safely say i won't be paying a visit to anytime soon). It is an utterly spellbinding read that you'll finish probably in 2 or 3 sessions but will stay with you for a long time. Im also a fan of Cormac McCarthy and this is remniscent of No Country for Old Men and The Road, and it is possibly the equal of both of those books. Best novel i've read for some time.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By P. J. T. Brown on 2 Aug 2006
Format: Hardcover
A strikingly wrought tale of Ree Dolly's search for her Da among Ozark's Hillbilly clans. Something of a cross between Deliverance and Cormac McCarthy - but different - this story is whipped by a bitter wind as the characters, high on dope and long memories struggle to suppress any notion of truth not idealised by kinship.

Sit back and enjoy - but thank the Lord they ain't your neighbours!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By rhysthomashello on 23 Nov 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ree Dolly's father has gone missing and she needs to find him before the bail bondsman takes her family home. He's mixed up in some pretty nasty business - his major talent is making drugs - and nobody is saying anything because it is the way of the Ozarks to keep to your own devices.

I love stories about way out of the way places in America, those hidden folds, and when they're written with the extraordinariness of Winter's Bone I'm in heaven. American fiction is a funny old thing because it's hard to say what is its defining style. Is it modern, clever writing a la Jonathan Franzen and Don DeLillo, or the solid old time landscape reflecting humanity a la Cormac McCarthy and John Steinbeck? Well it's the latter section that Woodrell falls into. His description of the Ozark mountains is stunning, and the way these cold barren places make cold, dark people is brought vividly to life. His writing thrusts you into that environment of frozen soil and freezing rivers and the story he drops on you is simple and lyrical.

The way of life is seen through the eyes of the rough and ready Ree Dolly, a girl of school age who is tasked to look after his mentally ill mother and two young brothers because her father is more often than not absent. She dreams of joining the Army, getting away from her roots, but how can she when there's nobody there to run the homestead? Her character is beautifully rendered, her resilience demonstrated in a series of frightening and awful scenes where she has to deal with unfriendly locals who don't like being asked difficult questions. You really find yourself rooting for her. This book is on a par with the Franzen but in a wholly different way.
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