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Winnie Ille Pu (Latin) Paperback – Jul 1991


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Paperback, Jul 1991
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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (July 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014015339X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140153392
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 336,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Title: Winnie Ille Pu <>Binding: Paperback <>Author: A.A.Milne <>Publisher: PenguinBooks

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 5 July 2005
Format: Paperback
Perhaps Vergil would have opted for Pu (Pooh) rather than Aeneid had he the choice, and begun his tome not in the journey from Troy, but rather the journey around the forest.
I have this sitting next to books of equally interesting exercise, such as a translation of modern poetry into Old English. Likewise, Henry Beard's translations of various ordinary statements and phrases in Latin (and cat behaviours in to French) also sit next to this honoured tome.
When I returned from Britain and began to think in theological-training terms, I had to re-acquaint myself with Latin; for an exam I had to memorise one biblical passage, one passage from the Aeneid, and one passage of my choice. I chose Winnie Ille Pu, and, as it had not been excluded from the list, I was permitted this indulgence (I believe that the exam list now has a section of excluded works, including this one, more's the pity).
Do not be frightened off by the fact that this is a book in Latin. It is very accessible, and quite fun to read with the English version of Winnie-the-Pooh at its side. The Latin version has kept many of the original illustrations as well as the page layout forms, for example:
In English:
And then he got up, and said: 'And the only reason for making honey is so as I can eat it.' So he began to climb the tree.
He
climbed
and he
climbed
and he
climbed,
and as he
climbed
he
sang
a little
song
to himself.
It went
like this:
Isn't it funny
How a bear likes honey
Buzz! Buzz! Buzz!
I wonder why he does?
In Latin:
Et nisus est
et
nisus est
et
nisus est
et
nisus est
et nitens carmen sic coepit canere:
Cur ursus clamat?
Cur adeo mel amat?
Read more ›
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 May 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is just what it sounds like - a Latin translation of Winnie The Pooh. First published thirty years ago, it has been through tiny print run after tiny print run as publishers can't believe anyone would really buy it, but we do, and we love it.
The Latin is elegant and fluent, and, bizarrely, easier to read than most specially-written-for-learners texts. Winnie the Pooh himself is even funnier in Latin, and, somehow, the oracular pronouncements of the Bear of Very Little Brain sound even more philosophical in the language of Cicero.
A marvellous present for anyone studying Latin, and a must-have for the library of any school where Latin is taught.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Sep 2003
Format: Paperback
As a latin student, this book is the type of thing I love. It means that you can practise the language you are learning to translate in an interesting way, based on a topic you enjoy. We shouold be allowed to use this in class!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 26 April 2006
Format: Hardcover
I sing of a boy and a bear...

Perhaps Vergil would have opted for Pu (Pooh) rather than Aeneid had he the choice, and begun his tome not in the journey from Troy, but rather the journey around the forest.

I have this sitting next to books of equally interesting exercise, such as a translation of modern poetry into Old English. Likewise, Henry Beard's translations of various ordinary statements and phrases in Latin (and cat behaviours in to French) also sit next to this honoured tome.

When I returned from Britain and began to think in theological-training terms, I had to re-acquaint myself with Latin; for an exam I had to memorise one biblical passage, one passage from the Aeneid, and one passage of my choice. I chose Winnie Ille Pu, and, as it had not been excluded from the list, I was permitted this indulgence (I believe that the exam list now has a section of excluded works, including this one, more's the pity).

Do not be frightened off by the fact that this is a book in Latin. It is very accessible, and quite fun to read with the English version of Winnie-the-Pooh at its side. The Latin version has kept many of the original illustrations as well as the page layout forms, for example:

In English:

And then he got up, and said: 'And the only reason for making honey is so as I can eat it.' So he began to climb the tree.

He

climbed

and he

climbed

and he

climbed,

and as he

climbed

he

sang

a little

song

to himself.

It went

like this:

Isn't it funny

How a bear likes honey

Buzz! Buzz! Buzz!

I wonder why he does?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Nov 1998
Format: Paperback
_Winnie Ille Pu_ has been an amazing help for me, as I am beginning to learn Latin. I am fond of A. A. Milne's Winnie the Pooh books, so this just topped off the list. Having a classic children's book translated into Latin was wonderful, and I extend my greatest thanks to those who translated it. Even if you don't know Latin, it's an incredible introduction to the language!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME on 14 Mar 2006
Format: Paperback
I sing of a boy and a bear...
Perhaps Vergil would have opted for Pu (Pooh) rather than Aeneid had he the choice, and begun his tome not in the journey from Troy, but rather the journey around the forest.
I have this sitting next to books of equally interesting exercise, such as a translation of modern poetry into Old English. Likewise, Henry Beard's translations of various ordinary statements and phrases in Latin (and cat behaviours in to French) also sit next to this honoured tome.
When I returned from Britain and began to think in theological-training terms, I had to re-acquaint myself with Latin; for an exam I had to memorise one biblical passage, one passage from the Aeneid, and one passage of my choice. I chose Winnie Ille Pu, and, as it had not been excluded from the list, I was permitted this indulgence (I believe that the exam list now has a section of excluded works, including this one, more's the pity).
Do not be frightened off by the fact that this is a book in Latin. It is very accessible, and quite fun to read with the English version of Winnie-the-Pooh at its side. The Latin version has kept many of the original illustrations as well as the page layout forms, for example:
In English:
And then he got up, and said: 'And the only reason for making honey is so as I can eat it.' So he began to climb the tree.
He
climbed
and he
climbed
and he
climbed,
and as he
climbed
he
sang
a little
song
to himself.
It went
like this:
Isn't it funny
How a bear likes honey
Buzz! Buzz! Buzz!
I wonder why he does?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


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