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Windswept House Paperback – 13 Jul 1998


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Product details

  • Paperback: 658 pages
  • Publisher: Main Street Books; Main Street Books ed edition (13 July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385492316
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385492317
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 111,186 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Dunne, Globe on 10 April 2012
Format: Paperback
New news

There is much in this book that will be `new news' to the reader.

For example, few Catholics know that John XXIII did not believe in the visionary saints, the reason he canonized only saints who founded good causes. It was he who coined the phrase `The Fatima Cult.' What's more, he refused to reveal the contents of the 3rd letter on grounds that the Vatican--he--did not accept the testimony of its visionaries.

The less astute public might not grasp everything said here. But, each one of them will learn something they never knew before. This is the great contribution of this work.

Yet, there is a problem. Whereas, on the one hand, there is much historical information--things that actually happened; on the other hand, there is much fantasy--things that never happened. The shortcoming is that the author does not draw a line between the two.

For instance, the `black mass' serves as a gripping opening, despite that it might be offensive to many Catholics who each Sunday morning participate in the same ritual - Christ's clever substitute of harmless blood and wine for the blood sacrifice demand of His Father in the Old Testament (Leviticus). Yet, though not the author's intent, many readers might take it that this ritual actually took place.

This kind of window dressing might serve to entrap the less astute mass. Yet, it is bothersome to a few who would prefer this renowned priest turn toward molding his legacy as a great historian rather than as a great writer. He certainly has the credentials to do so.

Widely read on the Vatican, this is one of the most informative books on what goes on in Rome I've come across.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Sept. 1999
Format: Paperback
Fr. Malachi Martin's last book (and perhaps his best) reveals that the evening of Pope John Paul II's papacy is truly the moment of truth for the Catholic Church. Will JP II restore his decadent institution before his death, or will he allow it to disintegrate even more than it already has? Those who laud Fr. Greeley(a nice guy, but if he feels the way he does, why not just become a social worker) should take note that if his vision of the Church suceeds, then demographics show that by the year 2030 it will cease to exist as we know it. The answer to what ails the Church is not more updating;it is not more caving in to the world;it is preaching the undiluted Gospel of Chirst- a gospel that is "a hard saying",not one thatsays we can live as we like and it does not matter. Dr. Martin's book proclaimed this courageously; may angels sing him to his rest.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. David Brady on 23 April 2009
Format: Paperback
As usual Fr.Malachi draws our attention to the corruption of highly placed men in the Vatican who since the Council have worked to destroy all that faithful Roman Catholic hold dear.
Fr.Martin reveals much factual information woven into the plot of Windswept House, challenging the reader to discern fact from fiction.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Da Readah on 21 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback
WINDSWEPT HOUSE reads like a biography and leaves the reader wondering how much of it is fact, thinly disguised as fiction.

The crumbling of society that has only escalted since this book was first published is no longer inexplicable, no longer the fault of one president or the passage of one bill or any of the usual scapegoats. Martin traces an intricate web of evil and perversion coupled to power struggles and greed that rumble beneath the surface of society's foundations, splitting it with high-pressure fissures, cracking it apart. He clearly lays out how we have all been brainwashed into welcoming what was recently abhorrent to us.

Was Malachi Martin gifted with an unusual insight and foresight, or was he simply unmasking the host of the perverted masquerade ball we have all unwittingly been attending?

WINDSWEPT HOUSE is an unusually thought-provoking piece of fiction. Or is it thinly veiled fact?
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 July 1999
Format: Paperback
Malachi Martin is a very important author in today's world. And I am a big fan of his. So I am willing to accept that he had reasons of his own for writing this very spooky look at The Vatican as a weird and sinister novel instead of a work of non-fiction.
'Windswept House' is obviously the 2nd part of a trilogy detailing Martin's analysis of the world. The first part being the scholarly tome 'Keys of This Blood', the third part being 'El Ultimo Papa'.
(Note: All three of the texts can be read as stand-alone books without having read the others. In fact they are better read --as they are released-- as progress reports on The Vatican's status. 'Keys of This Blood' already is dated. And until 'El Ultimo Papa' is translated to English 'Windswept House' is the most current installment for English-only readers.)
'Keys of This Blood' was written when Martin seemed to still have hope The Vatican could remain a force in world politics. 'Windswept House' lays the foundation for the removal of The Vatican from the world stage due to dark and disturbing internal conflicts within The Church (which the book describes in lurid detail).
Read 'Windswept House' now, but more importantly get 'El Ultimo Papa' the second it is translated. It looks to be best book of Malachi Martin's yet.
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