Trade in Yours
For a £0.25 Gift Card
Trade in
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Wild Health: How animals keep themselves well and what we can learn from them [Hardcover]

Cindy Engel
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback --  
Trade In this Item for up to £0.25
Trade in Wild Health: How animals keep themselves well and what we can learn from them for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

10 Jan 2002
How do animals keep themselves well in the wild? Folklore and traditional medicine have long laid claim to feats of self-medication by animals, but, until recently, scientists have dismissed such stories as romantic anthropomorphism. This is now changing as more and more scientists uncover examples of insects, birds and mammals self-medicating their ills. Chimpanzees carefully select bitter-tasting anti-parasitic plant 'medicines' that counter intestinal parasites, elephants roam miles to find the clay which counters dietary toxins, and many birds species line their nests with pungent medicinal leaves and so improve their chick's chances against the ravages of skin parasites. This book, the first general overview of the emerging science of 'zoopharmacognosy', explores the behavioural strategies animals use to maintain health by resorting to no more mystical an explanation than Darwinian selection. These strategies have successfully endured the ravages of natural selection and could provide a solid basis for improving the health of animals in our care. By observing wild health and the many similarities with human self-medication, we may even discover (or rediscover) ways to further improve our own health.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Product details

  • Hardcover: 286 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; First Printing edition (10 Jan 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0297646842
  • ISBN-13: 978-0297646846
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 16.4 x 3.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 310,370 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'A Sensuous, rigorous analysis of how animals stay healthy in the wild' -- Celeste Biever, Financial Times, 17 January 2002

'A fact-filled fun-to-read book... Read this book, marvel, and start imitating the wisdom of wild animals' -- Jeffry Mason, author of 'When Elephants Weep'

'A fascinating new book... The implications are huge' -- Jerome Burne, Guardian, 17 January 2002

'With its faultless scholarship and beautiful writing, it is a stunning achievement' -- Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, author of 'The Hidden Life of Dogs'

About the Author

Cindy Engel earned a PhD in animal behaviour from the University of East Anglia. Her fieldwork has followed the habits of rabbits in England and the movements of jaguars in the jungles of southern Mexico. She is an assistant lecturer in the Faculty of Environmental Science at the Open University, and is currently also a consultant in animal behaviour for various commercial organic farms. A freelance radio and television science advisor, she has recently worked on a wildlife series for the National Geographic Channel, and a BBC radio series on the natural history of medicine. Cindy is also a practitioner of holistic medicine, and lives on a smallholding in rural Suffolk with her two children.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars animal wisdom 30 Jan 2003
Format:Paperback
A truly absorbing read. Based on meticulously sound scientific research, Wild Health by Cindy Engel is also easily accessible to the general reader. It's tightly written and densely packed with absolutely fascinating information. The author peels back a layer I didn't even know existed, looking behind the usual way animal behaviour is presented to the deep instinctive wisdom that enables wild creatures to keep healthy and to treat their own wounds and diseases. I love the positive approach of this book - so often we think of keeping healthy only after disease has struck. Why are humans so thick? Many of the examples of animals self-medicating are unforgettable. A man in a South American rainforest attacks a snake that invades his hut by beating it with a stick - but the snake keeps coming back with its wounds healed. The man starts to follow it and observes that after every beating it rolls in a particular plant to heal itself. Then what about the elephants who risk their lives walking a narrow path by an abyss to get to a clay pit and eat the clay? The clay provides them with essential minerals, and even though some do fall into the pit, the health of the herd is assured. But my favourite was the story about giraffes eating acacia leaves. As the acacia tree is eaten away and its life starts to be endangered, it manufactures a substance in its leaves that makes them bitter, and the giraffes stop eating it. Not only that, the tree gives off an airborne a chemical messenger that lets other acacia trees in the vicinity know what is happening, and they begin to turn their leaves sour in advance of getting eaten. Result: giraffes move off to find fresh trees. So not only are the trees saved, the giraffes are guaranteed a fresh supply of leaves when they return to those same acacias the following year. So probably trees are smarter than humans too. I could go on and on - but get the book yourself - what we want now is a film please, Cindy!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wild Health - thorough research 25 Mar 2002
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Cindy Engel's book is fascinating because not only does she perceive our urgent and profound new need for sustainable healthcare, she has also taken the trouble to research in depth zoological and ecological examples of animals' healthcare strategies. It is for the thoroughness of these surveys, which support a compelling argument, that we should be grateful to her.
Messages from pharmaceutical-industry-led medicine have misled us for too long. Who realised, before reading Cindy Engel's book, for example, that having a temperature is the body's mechanism for combating harmful infection? Or that secondary compounds in food, some 'toxic', can be deliberately ingested by animals for their protective health effects? Or that, though we know instinctively that lemon and pine are cleansing, we may not be aware that the volatile oils in those plants interfere with bacterial respiration and are commonly detrimental or repellent to arthropods and insects?
Cindy Engel concludes that human beings are too much like animals in captivity in the way we have limited our own healthcare strategies. Like Native Americans, she advocates, we should observe animal behaviour as the first step to achieving sustainable healthcare.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and very readable 4 Feb 2002
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
I loved this book. Seriously scientific but written in very accessible language. Highly topical with its relevance to BSE, foot and mouth, human allergies and drug addiction. Loads of fantastic anecdotes you find yourself repeating to friends, and a bibliography that makes you feel like you've covered a very broad range. Constantly refers to the need for studying animals in their native habitat ... not the laboratory. Makes you aware of how new the science of animal behaviour still is.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wild Health - thorough research 25 Mar 2002
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Cindy Engel's book is fascinating because not only does she perceive our urgent and profound new need for sustainable healthcare, she has also taken the trouble to research in depth zoological and ecological examples of animals' healthcare strategies. It is for the thoroughness of these surveys, which support a compelling argument, that we should be grateful to her.
Messages from pharmaceutical-industry-led medicine have misled us for too long. Who realised, before reading Cindy Engel's book, for example, that having a temperature is the body's mechanism for combating harmful infection? Or that secondary compounds in food, some 'toxic', can be deliberately ingested by animals for their protective health effects? Or that, though we know instinctively that lemon and pine are cleansing, we may not be aware that the volatile oils in those plants interfere with bacterial respiration and are commonly detrimental or repellent to arthropods and insects?
Cindy Engel concludes that human beings are too much like animals in captivity in the way we have limited our own healthcare strategies. Like Native Americans, she advocates, we should observe animal behaviour as the first step to achieving sustainable healthcare.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A valuable Resource 26 Mar 2007
Format:Paperback
I teach a section on health related behaviour in an MSc (Masters) course in Animal Welfare in one of the UK top universities. I use this book for the core syllabus, along with many of the scientific publications she refers to in the book. It is not only a very interesting and accessible read, it is sufficiently rigourous to be of value in an academic course (as an introduction). I can personally report that the book stands up well to multiple re-reading too - it is so fascinating and sometimes quite moving.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback