Wild Abandon and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £5.98 (46%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Wild Abandon has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Wild Abandon Paperback – 4 Aug 2011

34 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£24.82
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.01
£4.50 £0.01
£7.01 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Wild Abandon + Submarine + Submarine [DVD]
Price For All Three: £19.50

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Hamish Hamilton; First Edition edition (4 Aug. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 024114406X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241144060
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 1.8 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 226,643 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

A brilliantly comic tale of commune life going wrong . . . hilarious . . . very funny (The Times)

Warm, insightful comic writing (Independent on Sunday)

Riotous, hilarious, beautifully judged (Psychologies)

Wild Abandon is an engaging and emotionally stimulating, chuckle-out-loud read (Time Out)

As sublimely enjoyable as Submarine (Metro)

British fiction's Bright Young Thing (GQ)

About the Author

Joe Dunthorne was born and brought up in Swansea. His debut novel, Submarine, won the Curtis Brown prize, has been translated into ten languages and in spring 2011 was made into an acclaimed film by Richard Ayoade. His stories, poems and journalism have been published in the Guardian, the Independent, the Financial Times, the Sunday Times, Vice and Poetry Review. He lives in London.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By rhysthomashello on 7 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed Joe Dunthorne's first novel, Submarine, so was very much looking forward to Wild Abandon. The novel is set in a Gower commune and follows the disintegration of the founding family. It's different from Submarine in that it deals with adult characters and mind-sets, though the adults in the book still have a childlike innocent that gives the novel its charming tone. It's funny and tender and though I'm not sure I enjoyed it as much as Submarine it marks Joe Dunthorne as a perceptive and funny writer who writes beautifully at times. The characters are rich and fully realised and as a reader I invested in them. If it had a fault I'd say that it ran out of steam before the end and felt like a train coasting to a halt at a station rather than slamming into a wall. Okay, that metaphor went wrong somewhere. For me, I like to see a story arc and whilst it could be argued each character's story completes, which they do, I would have preferred a more cohesive direction at the end. Having said that this is still a great book that I'd thoroughly recommend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By D. Harris TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
In one of Terry Pratchett's books, a member of a clown family runs away to join a band of travelling accountants. Dunthorne's book contains a similar reverse rebellion when sensible Kate flees her boring life in an alternative community to explore what she hopes will be the dark underbelly of suburban life with the family of her boyfriend, Geraint.

In reality, the darkness was in the community all along. It is an edifice seemingly built on the vanity of her father, Don, and has some serious structural problems. In flashbacks that feature alongside the current narrative, it becomes clear that the "community" is really just Don and his university friends drifting into adulthood, never quite having parted, with student frictions and rivalries fossilised along the way (including those with their former landlord, Patrick, who joined the group and has been installed in his own accommodation, a geodesic dome which he suspects - rightly - was designed by Don to isolate him. Dunthorne deploys some cruel insights in this book, none more so that when he remarks - in connection with the construction of this dome - that the only difference between something done from love and something done from spite is that the latter will adhere better to a timetable.)

Something I particularly enjoyed in this book is Dunthorne's portrayal of his characters, which he succeeds in making at the same time sympathetic and deeply unlikeable, especially Albert, Kate's Bart Simpsonish brother. He is though a Bart with a steely edge. When Kate betrays him by leaving the community, and him, to revise for her A-levels with Geraint he becomes seriously weird, convinced that the world will soon end, and plots revenge by killing her favourite goat and serving it to her (Kate is a vegetarian).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Mr. Iain R. Wear on 21 Feb. 2015
Format: Paperback
When your first novel has been successful, it adds pressure onto the second. This is the situation facing Joe Dunthorne, as his debut ''Submarine'' won several awards, was adapted into a film and came highly praised by The Bookbag. This means ''Wild Abandon'' has to be rather good to keep his reputation intact.

Kate and Albert are two teenagers growing up in a commune in Wales. Kate is becoming more and more unsatisfied with the restraints of this life, whilst Albert is devoted to Kate and eagerly anticipating the end of the world. In the meantime, life in the commune is falling apart as numbers dwindle and their main benefactor goes off the rails and ends up in hospital. Kate and Albert's parents aren't getting on too well, either and Kate can stand it no longer.

For a book based largely in a relatively confined setting, Dunthorne fits in the whole of human experience. There is strife; both marital and between siblings, love, hate, harmony and discord. There is drug fuelled paranoia, drug fuelled sex, physical injury, mental strain and even murder - albeit only of a goat. More or less anything that could happen does within these pages.

This makes it a surprisingly intense read, emotionally speaking. Some of the characters may not seem to physically do all that much, but they're frequently feeling something, often more than their actions would suggest. The book is written to be more emotionally descriptive than physically descriptive and whilst this can be uncomfortable at times, it is compelling.

After the hilarity of his previous book, ''Wild Abandon'' wasn't as laugh out loud funny as I was expecting. However, it's written in such a way that you frequently smile at their antics on the way through.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
In a remote corner of Wales, a group of disparate modern hippies live together sharing a vague ideal of communal living. At the centre of the community (who call themselves, helpfully, The Community) is a family headed by Don and Freya, whose marriage is quietly collapsing, Kate, 18 years old and discovering her identity apart from the Community, and her little brother Albert.
Around them circle important friends such as Patrick, who slowly having a mental breakdown, and his unreachable love Janet, plus a stream of briefly-enthusiastic visitors known amusingly as "wwoofers".

The novel follows a season of their lives as Don attempts to rescue his marriage and bring Kate back into the family, at the same time reviving the fortunes of the fading commune, by staging a large A-level-results-day open-air concert.

We see the key characters vividly, from both the critical observations of their fellows and their inner voices. So as Don stiffens into a much-resented, middle-aged pomposity, inside he is increasingly lost, desparate and deeply sad. Albert's inner life is chaotically enthusiastic, childishly violent, but to his family he is vulnerable and loved.

The book climaxes with a post-apocalyptic recognition by Albert's family of just how lost and hurt he has become. They come together in tender, funny, unexpected ways to rescue him.

I did not find this novel as funny as its headline reviewers did. But it has depths and humanity and is not "just" a comic novel. There's certainly comedy in the character's absurdities, but its underpinned by a genuine warmth them.

Rewarding and enriching, very readable, very re-readable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback