Wilco [The Album]
 
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Wilco [The Album]

3 Jan 2012 | Format: MP3

£8.09 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
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30
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2:59
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2:59
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3
3:40
30
4
5:39
30
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3:24
30
6
4:21
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4:02
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3:04
30
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4:21
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4:11
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11
4:00
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12
4:24
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Digital Booklet: Wilco [the album]
n/a


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 26 Jun 2009
  • Release Date: 26 Jun 2009
  • Label: Nonesuch
  • Copyright: 2007 Nonesuch Records, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:04
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003MZU4ZG
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 79,246 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. D. Moore on 17 Jun 2009
Format: Audio CD
Being an enthusiast of Wilco's more experimental phase (Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, a Ghost is Born), I kind of missed the boat with Sky Blue Sky. You know sometimes you can't explain why an album misses the mark, any more than you can explain what makes a classic album a classic album, it just didn't do it for me. With Wilco (the album), Jeff Tweedy has done an In Rainbows (a lazy comparison maybe), and staddled the line of being faithful to their genre a la Being There and the more free thinking experi-jams of later works. Most importantly the album is crammed with class A tunesmithery which hangs together beautifully and, to me anyway, has that gonna-be-a-classic feel to it, where the sequencing of the tracks is of huge importance. The song writing is eclectic and holds ones interest (and frequently, ones breath) from start to finish and the band play beautifully, with tinkering, tinkling guitar runs and beautifully understated keys and piano motifs just bubbling under Jeff's intimate, confessional vocal. Sounds great wherever you are but highly recommended through a decent set of headphones with, preferably and decent glass of red wine and the sun just dipping below the horizon. Everyone should have this in their collection.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When I'd finished listening to this album for the first time, my immediate thoughts were what a good album it was and how instantly likeable and listenable it was. After the second hearing, I started to think that it was more than good, that it may be a little bit special. From the third listen onwards, it has firmly established itself as one of the best albums I've heard all year and, although perhaps not many Wilco purists would agree, it is now my favourite Wilco album ever. There's just something about the cohesive nature of the album, the fantastic melodies, the classic harmonies... it's as if they've taken the very best of each genre of rock from the last five decades and distilled it into one easy to swallow and delightfully tasting album. However, however much fun you have spotting the influences throughout, it remains unmistakably Wilco - and that is what makes it such a great piece of work.

From the Neil Young-esque opener, "Wilco (The Song)", which seems to 'lovingly borrow' the riff from Warren Zevon's "Werewolves Of London" and is too catchy for its own good (I was singing it for days), to "Everlasting Everything" which is reminiscent of Crowded House at their haunting best, via the echoes of George Harrison in "You Never Know", every single track is just so eminently pleasing in its own way. "One Wing" is both a superb rock song and a wonderful love song, "Black Bull Nova", again, reminds me of Crowded House at their most inventive. I could easily go on - this is a very strong collection of songs without a single track to let it down.
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By J. Jenkins on 17 Oct 2009
Format: Audio CD
An album which slowly reveals it's charms, much like previous effort Sky Blue Sky, Wilco (the album) largely sticks to the same template of tasteful rock classicism, with only krautrock freak out Bull Black Nova approaching the head-spinning experimentalism of albums like a Ghost is Born.

Fittingly for a self titled LP, there are plenty of callbacks to their previous work, with Wilco (the Song) and Sonny Feeling emulating the shimmering pop of Summerteeth, Solitaire and Country Dissapeared sharing the porch ballad feel of much of Sky Blue Sky, and I'll Fight and One Wing being the closest they've come to the mark one Americana of their debut for some time. The later song is particularly special, with one of Tweedy's finest, most emotive vocal performances to date.

This is certainly a more contented Wilco we're dealing with, and while it's great that Tweedy's found some peace, there's something a little irksome about the chiding vocal of You Never Know, where you're basically being told to cheer up by someone who's spent the good part of two decades making currency from his neurosis. But this upbeat, eager to please incarnation of the band has certainly resulted in one of their most accessible albums to date.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Red on Black TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 July 2009
Format: Audio CD
A few years back I found myself part of a persecuted minority. I was sadly part of those few deluded souls who felt that Wilco's "Sky blue sky" was a brilliant album that included tunes with dangerous hints of melody and some of there greatest songs (Impossible Germany is by any standards in the Wilco top 5). True it lacked the experimentation of the wonderful "Yankee Foxtrot Hotel" but Jeff Tweedy had followed this with the equally experimental "Ghost is born" and frankly after listening to the 15 minute drone dirge on that album "less than you think" I needed a break from his tablet induced moroseness.

"Sky blue Sky" was labelled in some quarters (very stupid quarters it has to be said) as "Dad rock" and some people started to talk about Wilco as if they had died and been replaced by some back to basics alt country monster. What then about the Wilco (the album), can it satisfy both the experimentalists and the traditionalists? The answer is it does not need to. Wilco are band that don't stand still and all of their albums are mini statements of where Jeff Tweedy's mental condition and state of happiness can be located. As it stands for the present it is at the happier end of the scale and we should be thankful for that. WTA is very different in many respects from "Sky blue sky" but it is not a radical departure.

The songs throughout the album are hook laden, melodic but also challenging.
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