Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£12.08
  • RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £0.91 (7%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Wicca: A Guide for the So... has been added to your Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £0.92
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner (Llewellyn's Practical Magick) Paperback – 31 Dec 1988


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.08
£5.33 £1.50
£12.08 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner (Llewellyn's Practical Magick) + Living Wicca: A Further Guide for the Solitary Practitioner + Complete Book of Witchcraft (Llewellyn's Practical Magick)
Price For All Three: £40.06

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.92
Trade in Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner (Llewellyn's Practical Magick) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.92, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Publications,U.S. (31 Dec. 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875421180
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875421186
  • Product Dimensions: 23.2 x 15.3 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (225 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 19,211 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Shamanism has been defined as the first religion. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

124 of 127 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Jan. 1998
Format: Paperback
I have been interested in and practicing Wicca for over twenty years. The first book I read about Wicca was Sybil Leek's book The Complete Art of Witchcraft. After reading The Charge I knew that this was for me and I wanted to learn more. Several years later I obtained the Witches Bible by Janet and Stewart Farrar but I couldn't find anyone interested in starting a Coven in my area and although they pointed me to Doreen Valiente's Witchcraft for Tommorrow (which is also a book for solitaries), the Sabbats were lacking. I also read Spiral Dance at this time and again it is very well written but it was geared towards group work.I had been reading Scott Cunningham's other books and they were all very helpful but when I found this one I was forever grateful. He clearly showed how one could write their own ceremonies to perform and he gives many good exercises. Unlike To Ride a Silver Broomstick he doesn't ignore the Goddess or the Holy Days for that matter. Instead of just explaining them in one paragraph (the Sabbats) he gives actual ceremonies that can be performed and he says that you can also write your own with excellent pointers to other books for study. He will be truly missed by many in the Wiccan/Pagan community.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
88 of 91 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
I was given this book, ironically enough, for Christmas when I was fifteen. After reading it, I found that I had learned enough abot Wicca to choose my path. I think this book is aimed at the person who is considering Wicca, but either is not ready for a coven in their mind or does not want to join one. It is also for the practitioner who is disappointed with their coven or thier present solitary workings. Those who know a bit about Wicca may find the first few chapters redundant, but will find that even they learn some specifics. I learned more about Wicca, but wouldn't call it a book for those who aren't considering the Craft to read for reference- the author wrote a book just for that purpose. I especially enjoyed the rituals he included. Cunningham makes it clear to the reader that they are not required to follow the rituals point-by-point to have effects, which is EXACTLY what I was looking for in my religion. I still use it monthly and recommend highly to the said people.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
87 of 91 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Sept. 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent source book for the solitary Wiccan, particularly as Scott Cunningham is far from dictatorial. Having been rather put off, in the past, by books that made very specific demands, this is a breath of fresh air. Solitary Wiccans individualistic by nature and generally prefer to develop their own rituals and magickal practices.
This book is ideal for the beginners as it provides a simple and very workable Book of Shadows at the end. The other two section are based on theory and practice respectively.
The Practice section includes some very valuable exercises and magickal techniques as well as a fully explained self-dedication ritual for those who do not feel fully Wiccan without one and a whole chapter on designing rituals.
The first section on Theory covers everything you might want to know about Wicca from Shamanism to Deities, Tools to Rituals, Days of Power to Circle Work.
For the perfect pairing. Read through this book first and then go on to Living Wicca, Scott Cunningham's new book in which he explains how to celebrate the feast days even in difficult circumstances and how to create and design your own personal path.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback
Recently learning that paganism is the worlds fastest growing religion I had to find out more and therefore came to the subject with only the most basic understanding.
This is one of those rare books that takes you by the hand in a friendly but not condescending manner and guides you through the complexities at a natural pace.
Being extremely careful not to be prescriptive Cunningham does provide details of his own practices, but always emphasising the personal and fluid nature of WICCA, and that they are examples for you to adapt or ignore.
Although sub titled "A guide for the solitary practitioner" I personally viewed the book as a great introduction to the subject and not in any way advocating solitary practice, merely stating it is the only option for many Wicca.
This is a truly excellent book, no wonder it has sold over 400,000 copies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
71 of 75 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Martin on 26 July 2001
Format: Paperback
The Nature religion of Wicca is developing and evolving at a surprising rate. Initially created as a reconstruction of the pagan "Old Religion", the Goddess-worship/religious witchcraft of ancient history, Wicca has had a hard time making itself accepted in a society brimming with religious bigotry, dogmatism and prejudice.
Taking advantage of today's (slightly) more tolerant outlook, this book presents many of the basic tenets and practices of various Wiccan traditions, complemented by the inclusion of the author's own Book of Shadows as a personal point of view. It provides a basic overview of the ideas behind the ritual, the mechanics behind the magic, and the issues that need to be considered by those walking the Wiccan path.
Those keen to know whether this is a "better" or "worse" book than Buckland's "Complete Book of Witchcraft" would, I think, do better to consider it simply "different". Cunningham's approach is not to handle the reader as his own student, as Buckland does, but to provide general information and answers on non-tradition-specific questions which might be asked by the newcomer or the simply curious.
Like Buckland's "Complete...", this is not a "spell book" for those raised on a pop-culture diet of "Charmed" and "Sabrina the Teenage Witch" - look to Titania Hardie for those - although neither is it solemn or grave. Wicca is, after all, a celebration of life. But to get the most out of this book, as with so many others, it's important that you are able to treat Wicca with the respect due to all religious traditions.
Overall, this is a fine reference tool, as well written and much more freeform than Buckland's "Complete..." - you can dip into this book more or less as you please, rather than having to work through a set curriculum. For those looking for general information rather than a specific course, this is ideal.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback