Why Weren't We Told? and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£20.70
  • RRP: £22.50
  • You Save: £1.80 (8%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £1.53
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Why Weren't We Told Paperback – 1 Feb 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£20.70
£11.47 £13.13


Trade In this Item for up to £1.53
Trade in Why Weren't We Told for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.53, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 266 pages
  • Publisher: Polebridge Press (1 Feb 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1598151118
  • ISBN-13: 978-1598151114
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.6 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 766,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Title: Why Weren't We Told <>Binding: Paperback <>Author: RexA.E.Hunt <>Publisher: PolebridgePress

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. G. Ramsbottom on 13 Jun 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
excellent range of articles from a progressive Christian perspective. Cannot recommend it more.....Buy this if you are interested in exploring new perspectives on Christianity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By G L Gibbs on 10 Jan 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are a Christian and want to know the latest thinking in the Reformed Churches, particularly in the southern Hemisphere, this is the ideal introduction: contributors from a whole range of Reformed traditions offer their thoughts, and you will read of the churches in action, see examples of prayers and liturgy, and be very encouraged. A real must-have for Christian free-thinkers!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rev. T. J. Carter on 28 April 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This volume enables the reader to have an overview of the sorts of things that 'progressive christians' believe, say and do. I was originally loaned the book and was so interested in it, that i bought my own copy!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert J Ellis on 1 Dec 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent resource book for those who label themselves Progressive Christian.
Available on Kindle - well worth the price.- highly recommended
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Preconditions for "progressive" Christianity 7 Feb 2013
By Michael Cocks - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Why Weren't We Told

Rev.Michael Cocks, Editor of The Ground of Faith:

This publication is designed as a resource book for "progressive" freethinking Christian congregations wishing to escape bondage to a literally interpreted Bible, and to foster a spirituality in touch with the world around us. It is to be "inclusive not exclusive, not just in the sense of gender, race or species but also in rejecting the fundamentalist mindset. It recognises that the `truth to live by' may be revealed in varying and multiple ways." (p.188)

Actual "progressive" congregations described are largely located in Australia and New Zealand, as are also the numerous contributing scholars. A good anthology of prayers and hymns is provided.

There is an interesting section on "reclaiming the heretics for progressive purposes", discussing Arius, Origen, Pelagius, Meister Eckardt and others.

The book is made up of almost one hundred contributions, with many authors, sure to stimulate much thought and creativity. People of varied philosophical persuasions will find much to value.

From the point of view of this reviewer, there is also an important defect that prevents this work from being even better.
Materialism or Naturalism is presented as the only proper belief. Only "the world of nature is real... Nature is necessary in the sense of requiring no sufficient reason beyond itself to account for its origin... Nature as a whole may be understood without appeal to any kind of intelligence or purposive agent... All causes are natural causes, products of other natural events." (A.E. Hunt, p.69)

The book goes no deeper than this. There is no consideration at all of the nature of mind. There is no reference to phenomena reported by all races of humankind at all periods of history, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, precognitive dreams, near death experiences. We gain no inkling that a large minority of scientists are not materialists: we hear nothing of what some eminent QM physicists have to say about mind, such as Brian Josephson, Wolfgang Pauli, Albert Einstein, (all Nobel Prize winners) or David Bohm, F. David Peat, or Rupert Sheldrake the biologist. All these and many others it seems can be ignored, for materialism here is deemed to be the only valid way of interpreting reality. Readers of this book could well echo the title, and ask, "Why weren't we told" about such matters? Are not "progressive" congregations wishing to find "the `truth to live by' [that] may be revealed in varying and multiple ways."? Are we to fall into the same trap as the 18th century philosopher David Hume, when, in talking about miracles, he assumed that he had knowledge of natural laws, when the "laws" were only theories?

Materialism, like religious fundamentalism, is the enemy of open-minded science. It prescribes conclusions and attempts to preclude the research. As "progressive" Christians our choice is not between fundamentalism and materialism, but between both of them and open-minded investigation. Such investigation will not lead us back to the God of the Old Testament but to some glimmer of understanding of what is meant by That which is "in all, through all, and above all."

Some questionable statements are made in this book: for instance, on page 72 we find New Testament scholar James Veitch stating that "the Gospel of Mark, circulating about the year 75 CE... told the story of Jesus in the form of a novel. Mark is not a historical novel but a story made up by the author." He later implies that any supposed resurrection appearance would be the product of grief-stricken imaginings.

Elsewhere, in his book Christianity without God (2002) , Lloyd Geering, who writes the Foreword to our present review book, is similarly dismissive of the stories of the resurrection appearances.

Veitch and Geering both enjoy considerable prestige, and this may lead readers to accept the opinions of "the experts." But it should be remembered that both men are committed to materialism/naturalism, and will reject any evidence that might overturn that doctrine. Neither are fond of St Paul who is seen as a theist, and as accepting the resurrection stories. But no one doubts that St Paul was a real person and that, while some epistles ascribed to him may not be his, his letters to the Galatians (written about 50 CE) and his first to the Corinthians (about 56 CE) are generally accepted as genuine.

Now while the story of the empty tomb is puzzling, and provides no evidence for the resurrection of Jesus, St Paul's testimony should be heeded: In writing to the Galatians [1:18-19 NIV] he has this to say, [After the appearance of Jesus to Paul, on the road to Damascus] ".. after three years, I went up to Jerusalem to get acquainted with Cephas (Peter) and stayed with him fifteen days. I saw none of the other apostles--only James, the Lord's brother." In writing his first letter to the Corinthians, Paul writes, [15:5-8 NIV] "that(Jesus)appeared to Cephas (Peter), and then to the Twelve. After that, he appeared to more than five hundred of the brothers and sisters at the same time, most of whom are still living, though some have fallen asleep. Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles, and last of all he appeared to me also, as to one abnormally born."

So we have Paul saying that he had been staying with Peter and James, and from them he probably heard firsthand about all the resurrection appearances that he reports in his first letter to the Corinthians, and compared them with his own. James Veitch's theory that Mark was not even an historical novel, and that all the resurrection appearances were illusions conjured up by weeping eyes, makes no sense, if we accept the testimony of Paul.

There is so much of value and interest in this book, that it seems unjust to dwell on the lack of open-minded science, the insistence on one philosophical standpoint. Church congregations are typically made up of people of all ages, differing stages of spiritual development, and differing beliefs. Congregations are held together by their relationships with each other, and a willingness to accept what goes on. There needs to be an acknowledgement that nobody possesses the knowledge of absolute truth, that science is an ongoing process. Freedom from closed-minded philosophies is a prerequisite for our spiritual growth.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A resource for progressive Christianity ideas 27 May 2013
By V. Webb - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is not intended as a read-straight-through book. As the title suggests, it is a handbook containing small vignettes on topics such as atonement, world religions, God, historical Jesus etc., as well as essays which consider progressive Christian ideas and practices in greater depth. Its authors are, for the most part, from Australia and New Zealand, as this book originated within the progressive Christianity movement in these countries which is becoming increasingly active. It is offered as a reference for lay people in particular for whom access to the plethora of topics included has not always been easy within their churches. The title derives from the repetitive cry of lay people when they, for the first time, discover that clergy have been taught biblical criticism in theological schools for centuries yet this freedom to interpret Jesus in ways other than the tradition has not filtered down to the pews. In fact, it has often been withheld from laity on the basis of "protecting" them or not rocking their boat when their boat is often close to sinking. While books such as "Living the Questions: the Wisdom of Progressive Christianity" by David M. Felton and Jeff Proctor-Murphy are more geared to reading through as a general overview of progressive Christianity, this handbook will be very useful for those who wish to read about individual topics, as one would use any other handbook or encyclopedia. There is a variety of writing styles and arguments, some of which may not be held by all the authors, but this demonstrates the diversity of emerging progressive Christianity at this point. Some articles are also better than others, which applies to most author collections. However, I do recommend it to those who seek answers beyond traditional church dogma and wish to explore progressive Christianity. Dr. Val Webb, theologian and author of "In Defence of Doubt: an invitation to adventure" and "Stepping out with the Sacred; human attempts to engage the Divine".
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Good; Nothing really new 10 Aug 2013
By popeye13 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really liked this book. It is written in terms anyone can understand. Some books that try to discuss the topics presented here tend to talk over my head. I recommend this one to anyone looking for validation that what we get from the pulpit is not all there is to know. In fact, some of it is just wrong! The author states that what he learned in seminary was systematically discouraged for the sake of organized religion's beliefs. It's no wonder people are leaving churches.
They need to read a couple of Philip Gully's books like If grace is true then every one will be ... 4 Dec 2014
By granville russell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
People in the pews in their churches only hear part of the story. The rest is held back to control the people. They need to read a couple of Philip Gully's books like If grace is true then every one will be saved and If God is love. This book is not a book to read through but a book to study.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
good read 28 Jan 2014
By cawdoc - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Late in my life I am learning all sorts of things about religion including a lot of the content in this book.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback