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Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions Paperback – Antique Books, 5 Oct 2006


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Frequently Bought Together

Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions + Does Anything Eat Wasps?: And 101 Other Questions (New Scientist) + Why Can't Elephants Jump?: and 113 more science questions answered
Price For All Three: £19.17

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Product details

  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: Profile Books; FIRST edition (5 Oct. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861978766
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861978769
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 58,950 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

An ideal Christmas gift for lovers of the strange and baffling. (Publishing News)

A fascinating mix of the baffling, ridiculous and trivial ... answers the scientific questions you never got round to asking. (Daily Express)

They are the things we've all wondered about, from why we cry when we slice onions, to what makes our hair turn grey (Daily Mirror)

The answers to life's most perplexing questions ... at last, the mysteries of the world are explained ... the book everyone is talking about (Independent on Sunday)

[An] extraordinary book ... responsible for putting popular science back on its feet. (Radio 5 Live)

If you have ever wondered why hair turns grey, fingers get crinkled in the bath or if the Great Wall of China really is visible from space, Mick O'Hare has the answers. (CNN)

Book Description

What time is it at the North Pole? Should you pickle your conkers? Why does my aubergine look like Elvis? These, plus 111 other questions answered.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
This book's predecessor, Does Anything Eat Wasps?, was the surprise publishing phenomenon of the 2005 Christmas season. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Alessi Lover TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 Feb. 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wonderful for anybody that wants to know the answers to life's sometimes baffling questions (especially if you have children that want the answers to questions that sometimes you even have doubts about). This book is almost certainly for you (look really clever in front of the childern, no more ask the teacher the answer to that one). Boys will love the question on snot, and for you older one's (the answer to why hair goes grey might be of some help, no it is not too much perming or colouring, buy and book and read it to find out.

I originally bought the book for our daughter who is aged 15 but couldn't resist a look at it myself, had to read it though as it is just so gripping, once looking at one question and answer, then it snowballs. (At least if I get caught short on the conversation front, now I can think of different questions and see how people answer), or they will just look and think what the heck am I on.

A must book for summer holidays, long car journeys, you could ask one question and get everyone to give their answer to it, enjoyable fun and could put the end to are we there yet?

Bought my copy from Amazon on offer, so got a really good deal, but even at full price less than £8.00 still a good buy.
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66 of 68 people found the following review helpful By W. Chung on 9 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
This book, the follow up to 'Does Anything Eat Wasps?', of trivial, is a wonderful compilation of trivial, unimportant questions that you might wonder about but never really knew the answer to, or who to ask, or where to look.

Why Don't Penguins Feet Freeze? compiles a list of these questions, all categorised into their own section, all come with a variety of responses (scientific, factual and sometimes funny and bizarre) for you to enjoy.

You don't have to be an expert in science to appreciate and enjoy this book (such as me). Embrace it and learn something new everyday. Definitely worth checking out.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Rowena Hoseason HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 9 May 2007
Format: Paperback
There are now quite a few of these type of books around, but this volume and its partner (the one about Does Anything Eat Wasps?) are the originals. And they are very entertaining!

The information is taken from New Scientist magazine, however, so very often it is quite complex and detailed. The questions are very varied, and range across natural history, biology, chemistry, physics, astrophysics -- you name it. Sometimes the questions are very basic; sometimes they are complicated -- and sometimes the answers can be half a dozen lines or several pages long.

These trivia snippets are a bit like grown-up factoids: interesting to read and file away, and maybe useful once in a blue moon, but mainly worth reading to satisfy some curiosity.

Because the book is divided into sections, and each question forms a different topic, it is very easy to dip in and out of this book. It's much harder to read it all in great long sessions, as you would a novel.

So this is maybe a book to keep in the small room and flick through when the mood takes you!

Although it is non-fiction, Penguin's Feet isn't a reference book as such. Because the topics are so different, and the replies vary in depth and detail, this really isn't a serious science guide.

Instead it's a jolly compilation which lets you surf through some science -- and it's no problem if you skip the bits you don't understand!
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By JimW on 31 Oct. 2006
Format: Paperback
I picked this up cos i liked Lynne Truss's book - eats shoots and leaves. Rarely do i follow publishers, but the people behind Lynne's book put this out, so I bought it. And loved it. The balance of bizarre factoids and science behind them is spot on. There's a lot of question and answer books out at the moment but this ranks as one of the best. Interestingly, the other one i'd recommend is also by the same publishers and is called the end of the question mark. They seem to be on a roll!
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Thrud Fan VINE VOICE on 1 Nov. 2006
Format: Paperback
I cannot fault this book. I to was a fan of the first one (which if you read the intro to this book was actually the third book based on the last word). A great book for enquiring minds, pub bores and anybody else who wants to know if a fly can stop a train, why the sky is blue and what time it is at the North Pole.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 20 Oct. 2009
Format: Paperback
The 'New Scientist' is a weekly magazine, first published in 1956, that covers the recent happenings in the scientific world. In 1994, the magazine launched a new column called "The Last Word" in which its driven by its readers - not all of whom are geeks in white coats. Here, they could not only pose a science-related question, but also provide the answers. In 2005, a selection of the questions asked and answered were gathered together for "Does Anything Eat Wasps ?" - a book that elbowed its way to the upper ends of the UK's bestseller's list. Unsurprisingly, with a great deal of material still available, New Scientist decided to follow it up with "Why Don't Penguin's Feet Freeze ?".

The book is divided into chapters, depending on the focus of the questions selected - our bodies, plants and animals, and weird weather for example. While the book is informative, it is equally as likely to raise a smile - the overall tone is not that of a difficult, highbrow scientific paper. Some of the questions that are dealt with include : "Why do birds never fall off their perches when sleeping ?", "Fish don't fart, why is this ?", "Why doesn't superglue stick to the inside of the tube ?", "What time is it at the North Pole ?" and - from a nine year old boy - "Is it a coincidence that a human finger fits exactly into a human nostril ?"

An enjoyable and informative book - it's one I tend to dip into once in a while, rather than reading it from cover to cover.
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