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Why Bother?: Sir Arthur Streeb-Greebling in Conversation with Chris Morris (BBC Radio Collection) Audio CD – Audiobook, 1 Mar 1999


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Audio CD, Audiobook, 1 Mar 1999
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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: BBC Audiobooks Ltd (1 Mar 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0563558601
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563558606
  • Product Dimensions: 14.3 x 1 x 12.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 139,988 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By peterdc on 4 July 2000
Format: Audio Cassette
It's hard to add anything to the review below because it sums up the series so eloquently. Delightfully unscripted (on the whole), this is possibly the most enjoyable work from Mr Morris. He does indeed owe a debt to comedic visionaries like Peter Cook, and here Mr Cook is given the time and the space to wax at length about total absurdities (P.O.W in Japan, The explanation of Christ and the subsequent Japanese interest, assassinations from restaurant trollies, and spending time secreted in a prisoner's trousers). Peter Cook shines throughout, stamping his mark as one of the 20th centuries great humourists. I'm sure Mr Morris learnt more from this than he contributed. Even so, his dry and surreal wit is irrisistible bait to Mr Cook. Outstanding. And, given Peter Cook's death soon afterwards, something to cherish.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Mar 1999
Format: Audio Cassette
Peter Cook's final flash of brilliance - as the deeply preposterous Sir Arthur Streeb-Greebling in conversation with the lightly menacing Christopher Morris - is as moving as it is hilarious. Cook's performance is a masterpiece of comic acting, with displays of wit, timing and surreal whimsy to put Steve Coogan and co. firmly in their place. Chris Morris owes an obvious debt to his interviewee, but his bizarre yet logical questions and steely satire provide the perfect foil.
Despite the presence of eels, tiny Christs and Japanese hover-donkeys, the prevailing atmosphere is sombre, so it is hardly surprising that the five ten-minute programmes went out quietly on Radio 3. Nowhere else will you hear anyone say "the next time we want to interview you you'll probably be dead" and actually mean it.
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85 of 92 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 29 July 2002
Format: Audio CD
I've lent this tape to several people and not a single one realised that Cook improvised the whole thing. That is a mark of genius. Cook's character, Sir Arthur Streeb-Greeblng (not to be confused with his nemesis, Sir Arthur Greeb-Streebling), is a comic gold mine, and having aged a lot since his appearances on Not Only ... But Also, has become something not entirely dissimilar to the Fast Show's Rowley Birkin, but far funnier.
It's truly wonderful that that the careers of Peter Cook and Chris Morris, in many ways Cook's obvious successor, overlapped enough for us to hear them work together. Morris has a frustrating habit of trying too hard to be contraversial (the awful Brass Eye special springs to mind), but he can be a truly brilliant surrealist when he's not trying to upset people.
Morris doesn't say much on "Why Bother", but does a great job of forcing Cook into improvising. It's obvious at times that Cook has a routine in mind, but Morris refuses to let him take over, instead forcing the conversation into truly surreal directions. When you think of some of the pretentious "artists" who appeared on early editions of "Whose Line Is It Anyway", it's hard to imagine that they could cope with being asked for info regarding their plan to revive the infant Christ and exhibit him around the world.
Although there is a sense of Cook squirming to come up with material,he never drops out of character or (crucially) stops being funny. VERY funny.
The highlight for me must be Sir Arthur's story about bee-keeping, which makes me laugh out loud every single time I hear it. Similarly, the tales of Sir Arthur's father's attempts to make a man of him are priceless, and his attempts to convince Morris to let have a haircut during the interview.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 April 2002
Format: Audio CD
Character-based comdey wich is subtle, rich, facinating, contemporary, effortless and masturfully executed. I know of nothing else quite like this - but I'd guess that if you enjoy Steve Coogan's approach to comedy, perhaps more for its subtlety, depth and originality than for its obvious storyline, then you will be more than satisified with Peter Cook's creation - Sir Arthur. Complex, dark, ridiculous, plausable, abhorrent and likeable - all at the same time. A very rare treat indeed.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By "jaguar00" on 3 Nov 2001
Format: Audio CD
The description by Cook's character Arthur Streeb-Greeblng of taking part in the L.A riots and of being even-handed, he killed as many whites as blacks told with a straight, upper class accent is just fantastic. The imagination of the man was that of a genius. He is much missed.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. Mcsloy on 10 Sep 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is by far the funniest cd I have ever had the pleasure to hear , and certainly the best thing either Morris or Cooke have ever done. It is made up of five ten-minute mock interviews with Morris playing the role of a brusque journalist getting perhaps the last interview with an aging Sir Arthur Street-Greebling. After all Sir Arthur is to "anyone who can see him quite clearly nearing death".

Morris is a perfect foil for Cooke, never letting him take the easy route, forcing him to come up with killer one-liner after killer one-liner, and just when Peter is getting comfortable with the way the interview is going, Morris ask's him a question that you are sure is going to make the whole improvisation collapse but Cooke manages to keep it on the tracks, sending it careering up some surreal junction.

The funniest track is the one about Sir Arthur Street-Greeblings discovery of the fosilised remains of the infant Christ-child. When asked why he hasn't told the Vatican about his discovery he replies "It's none of their business... and it is a business". He then goes on to describe his plans to market minature clones of Jesus in "the usual manner". Morris then asks if he fears that Christ will try to remonstrate in some way, to which Arthur counters "well he can try, but he'll be pretty lost without the batteries".

Anyway just buy the damn thing. It's not as funny in type, you just have to hear it.
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