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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; Reissue edition (4 July 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415289793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415289795
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 87,808 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

Bohm is a tremendously exciting thinker, and this is undoubtedly a book of the first importance -- Colin Wilson

I find his concept of wholeness extraordinarily appealing... -- John P. Wiley Jnr., Smithsonian --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

David Bohm (1917-92). Renowned physicist and theorist who was one of the most original thinkers of the second half of the twentieth century.

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60 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Peter FYFE on 21 May 2004
Format: Paperback
At its heart, David Bohm awe-inspiring book explores a deceptively simple and [I think] very old idea: everything in the universe that we can observe, measure, describe, and come to understand is connected, even if we cannot observe, measure, describe and come to understand that connection (Bohm's "implicate order"). It's not for the faint hearted. You'll be confronted with a devastatingly beautiful philosophical insight that completely undermines our post-"enlightenment" western tendency to divide, conquer, fragment and isolate everything we attempt to understand. You may need to skip the mathematical chunks and do some background reading into Quantum physics to survive the rigours of the argument. You'll probably get frustrated at Bohm's winsome ability to be mathematician and physicist one minute and philosopher and mystic the next. But if you hang in there, you'll find yourself returning again and again to contemplate this profound contribution to occidental thinking, as I have.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By The holo-man on 6 Jan 2008
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This book deserves to be better known - it should be as popular as the "Tao of Physics". The only reason I don't give it 5 stars is that there are sections that don't live up to the claim to be written without technical jargon. But don't let that put you off as it mainly concerns just one chapter and, while the rest of the book may require a little intellectual exercise, it is well worth the effort so that you can share Bohm's view of the universe as a holomovement. He even resolves the problem of non-locality and thus reconciles the differences between quantum theory and relativity. Bohm has taken science forward, it is just a pity that so few have followed him.
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45 of 47 people found the following review helpful By MR P J TURNER on 15 Jan 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a superbly written exposition of intriguing ideas on the nature of reality. I have not studied Physics but was able to understand the key concepts used to convey Bohm's theory. Bohm's key idea is that reality is a totality in movement and can not be completely grasped by fragmented and static thought. Rather we must allow our own understanding to move and change with what we observe to stay closer to reality. Deep, enlightening and insightful stuff!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By nicholas hargreaves on 5 Dec 2012
Format: Paperback
The first three chapters of this book,use philosophy and etymology to reposition the fragmentary belief systems prevalent in modern physics and further incorporate them as sub-sets in the larger framework of a wholly inclusive higher dimensional reality,of which our experiential existence is but a projection.
The middle section of the book is a mathematical treatment of an attempt to prove that it is possible to introduce new concepts into Quantum theory,that while still giving the same results,support the idea that certain hidden variables are responsible for as yet unexplained experimental phenomena,such as the paradox of Einstein,Rosen Podolsky(spooky action at a distance) and electron interference patterns (two slit experiment).This section is particularly heavy going for the general reader,although the explanations between equations do elucidate what is generally implied.
Finally the last chapters round up the previous lines of thought and use the example of the Hologram and its enfoldment of information,to explain this theory of wholeness and how consciousness and matter can be interrelated and our explicate reality is born out of an implicate reality.
This is,not to my mind,a book aimed at a general readership as is implied in some other reviews.I couldn't help thinking that large sections could have been more clearly written and more examples and allegory used particularly in the first half.It is technical in many places and quite verbose due to the academic standards of its author.However if you are a reader of popular science then it shouldn't present any difficulties although "The Holographic Universe" by Michael Talbot is a less rigorous treatment and extension of the same theory that has more appeal to the general reader.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jo on 8 Sep 2011
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What a read! Both in terms of difficulty (even forgetting the maths!) and the concepts discussed.
Mr Bohm's name is deservedly uttered in the same breath as the likes of Newton, Einstein et al. and I'm not surprised that his ideas have brought about a paradigm shift in scientific thinking. The subject he tackles in this book is a big one: the universe and our place in it. This is not an easy read as he deals with abstract concepts like thought, knowledge, intelligence etc., and you may find yourself reading and re-reading chapter after chapter, but persevere....this book has answers to big questions!
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful By nigelmallows@yahoo.com on 6 July 2001
Format: Paperback
I read this book eight years ago but its impact is still with me to this day. David Bohm writes with great authority and clarity. He uses language, which by its very nature, is dualistic, to describe something which has no opposite. In doing so, he has enabled me, and any other reader who so chooses, to transcend the tiresome Aristotelian dialectic which seems to be so necessary to preserve the world-view that time and space are real!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ashtar Command on 5 Nov 2011
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David Bohm's "Wholeness and the Implicate Order" is a curious book. Modern quantum physics meet Henri Bergson, Advaita Vedanta and presumably Jiddu Krishnamurti. Some sections of the book are so technical than I don't understand them. Others sound like new agey flim flam. Bohm was a world-renown scientist, but he also had a longstanding friendship with Krishnamurti, self-defrocked Theosophist and spiritual teacher in the Hindu-Buddhist vein. What Bohm calls "the implicate order" or the "holomovement", a Hindu would presumably call Brahman. In Bohm's more Bergsonian version, the holomovement is constantly evolving, implying that somehow humanity can evolve further, too. (Note the Theosophical antecedents for this idea.)

To Bohm, both matter, life and consciousness arise from the holomovement, which is itself neither. Curiously, Bohm's speculations are on some points more "rational" than official quantum physics (the Copenhagen interpretation), since he attempts to explain various bizarre quantum phenomena by deriving them from a higher order of reality, which is open to scientific exploration, at least up to a certain point. The seemingly "occult" behaviour of atoms and particles in standard quantum physics could thus be explained as caused by the implicate order. Mystery solved. On the web, I found some "sceptics", read atheists or agnostics, who are interested in Bohm precisely for this reason, since they consider the Copenhagen interpretation to be down-right irrational flim flam. It's therefore ironic that Bohm himself was looking for Brahman!

Bohm's metaphysics could be regarded as pantheist, panpsychist or perhaps panentheist. "Our" reality is an abstraction or holographic projection of the implicate order.
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