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Who Makes Our Money? Paperback – 1 Feb 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 154 pages
  • Publisher: Steven Books (1 Feb 2011)
  • ISBN-10: 1907861211
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907861215
  • Product Dimensions: 14.8 x 1.2 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,647,824 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

A popular paperback book on finance, economics and money.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By fighter in the long grass on 30 May 2011
Format: Paperback
I purchased this book some months ago and naively expected it to be perhaps an expose of low level banking sector functionaries like Fred Goodwin, and i couldn`t have been more wrong. The author is quirky but brilliant and the tale he weaves is a white knuckle ride into forbidden territory; an expose of behind the scenes financial machination and manipulation that hardly seems possible. If you deride conspiracies-as many do even though they are undeniably a fact of life- then order this amazing treatise by a pacifist free spirit and incisive thinker, and see if you still think so afterwoods.
Irsigler gets your full attention from the opening lines, and his theories will both inform and stun you. A full review would spoil it for the reader, but suffice it to say that free thinkers should be aware that `WHO MAKES OUR MONEY`, properly digested, will turn most of the politics of the 20th Century on it`s head.
Readers and researchers who like their routine lives- 2 holidays a year, 1.7 kids, small pleasures and hobbies etc. etc. and who want nothing to jerk them out of their cozy existence should not bother to order `WHO MAKES OUR MONEY`. Remaining interested persons must prepare to be astonished.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rerevisionist on 2 Oct 2011
Format: Paperback
Franz Johann Irsigler (born 1900) was a Catholic who lived in France and South Africa, where he worked in neurology and the brain.

Irsigler has chapters on the American War of Independence, Who Plotted World War I ..., Who Plotted World War II ..., Roosevelt, financing of the so-called 'communist revolution', Churchill, the CIA, the press, paper money, Eisenhower a 'friend of Bernard Baruch ... promoted over 150 others ... without battle experience', 'Why genocide and holocaust', the Soviet Union's covert industrialisation, debt and developing nations, and a lot more. He has quite a good writing style.

This book has eighteen chapters, but layout and logical structure is weak; hence four stars. Some chapters are in effect book reviews; others switch between topics; and the bibliographical information is not very good. His sources include books like 'None Dare Call It Conspiracy', 'The Red Pattern of World Conquest', 'The Federal Reserve and Our Manipulated Dollar'. 'Western Technology and Soviet Economic Development' gets an unclear mention. Ingersoll (the rationalist) is quoted - Irsigler notes that Catholicism has the idea of eternal punishment, for example. There's some specific South African influence - the Afrikaners wanted to keep out of WW2, he says; he also notes that going to war was liked by many - they got regular pay.

The collection seems to have been published first in 1980. It needs improved titles, subheadings, a table of contents, and indexing. And really it should be edited to collect the ideas more readably. But anyone interested in revisionist (i.e. true) approaches to the first and second world wars, and related topics, would learn a lot from Irsigler.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By P. J. Anderson on 26 Nov 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
sadly not really what it says on the tin but a piece of BNP style propaganda on banking in genera;
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Revisionist survey of the part played by Jews since c 1694 7 Feb 2012
By Rerevisionist - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Franz Johann Irsigler (born 1900) was a Catholic who lived in France and South Africa, where he worked in neurology and the brain.

Irsigler has chapters on the American War of Independence, Who Plotted World War I ..., Who Plotted World War II ..., Roosevelt, financing of the so-called 'communist revolution', Churchill, the CIA, the press, paper money, Eisenhower a 'friend of Bernard Baruch ... promoted over 150 others ... without battle experience', 'Why genocide and holocaust', the Soviet Union's covert industrialisation, debt and developing nations, and a lot more. He has quite a good writing style. But his title is hopelessly misleading!)

This book has eighteen chapters, but layout and logical structure is weak; hence four stars. Some chapters are in effect book reviews; others switch between topics; and the bibliographical information is not very good. His sources include books like 'None Dare Call It Conspiracy', 'The Red Pattern of World Conquest', 'The Federal Reserve and Our Manipulated Dollar'. 'Western Technology and Soviet Economic Development' gets an unclear mention. Ingersoll (the rationalist) is quoted - Irsigler notes that Catholicism has the idea of eternal punishment, for example. There's some specific South African influence - the Afrikaners wanted to keep out of WW2, he says; he also notes that going to war was liked by many - they got regular pay.

The collection seems to have been published first in 1980. It needs improved titles, subheadings, a table of contents, and indexing. And really it should be edited to collect the ideas more readably. But anyone interested in revisionist (i.e. true) approaches to the first and second world wars, and related topics, would learn a lot from Irsigler.
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