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White Witch, Black Curse (Hollows (Blackstone Audio)) MP3 CD – Audiobook, 24 Feb 2009

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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; MP3 Una edition (24 Feb. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 143327034X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1433270345
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 13.7 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,464,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

The only girl in a large family of boys, former tomboy Kim Harrison invented the first Brigadier General Barbie in self-defence. She shoots a very bad game of pool and rolls a very good game of dice. When not at her keyboard, she enjoys lounging on the couch with a bowl of popcorn watching action movies with The-Guy-In-The-Leather-Jacket. She plays her Ashiko drum when no one is listening, and is hard to find when the moon is new.

Product Description

Review

‘Action packed chick-lit with a supernatural twist‘
The Times

‘A spellbinding blend of sharp wit and vivid imagination. A wonderfully fun romp through the supernatural world’
Kelley Armstrong

‘Discovering a new series like this is like finding buried treasure’
Diana Gabaldon

‘I wouldn’t miss a Kim Harrison book for anything’
Charlaine Harris, author of the Sookie Stackhouse novels

About the Author

The only girl in a large family of boys, former tomboy Kim Harrison invented the first Brigadier General Barbie in self-defence. She shoots a very bad game of pool and rolls a very good game of dice. When not at her keyboard, she enjoys lounging on the couch with a bowl of popcorn watching action movies with The-Guy-In-The-Leather-Jacket. She plays her Ashiko drum when no one is listening, and is hard to find when the moon is new.


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First Sentence
The bloody handprint was gone, wiped from Kisten's window but not from my memory, and it ticked me off that someone had cleaned it, as if they were trying to steal what little recollection I retained about the night he'd died. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By T. McAuley on 3 May 2009
Format: Hardcover
If you're reading 'White Witch, Black Curse', chances are you're already a confirmed fan of Kim Harrison's 'Hollows' series, featuring witch and professional bounty hunter, Rachel Morgan. If you're not, and have just come across the book by chance, I'd advise you to put it aside until you've read the preceding six volumes, as the book contains so many references to previous events that you'll find it quite hard going without knowing the back story.

For Rachel fans, all the familiar faces are back: Ivy, still struggling with her vampiric nature; Jenks, four inches of potty-mouthed heroism; Al, always out to exploit the slightest weakness; and Trent, although he's restricted to a single, minor appearance. Added to them, there's able support from more minor characters like Glen, no longer such a secret tomato addict; Skimmer, not surprisingly full of hate and rage; and Rachel's mother, finally moving on.

With such a cast of characters, and a weight of previous events, perhaps it's not surprising that Rachel's kept as busy as ever: this time around, she has to contend with hunting down a Banshee - an aura and soul-sucking killer in the Hollows' universe; continuing to try and recover her memory and find the murderer of her vampire lover, Kisten; and dealing with demon Al, who's abducted Pierce, a ghost and former acquaintance of Rachel's from her teenage years. All of these threads are neatly resolved by the end of the book - in some cases perhaps a little too neatly: a Banshee attack conveniently prevents Rachel from pursuing Al into the Ever-After, after Pierce's abduction, and the final showdown, again conveniently, takes place somewhere that triggers her recollections of Kisten's murder.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Ana C. Silva on 31 July 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I will start this review by saying that I love Kim Harrison's series The Hollows. They were the first true Urban Fantasy series I collected, and it has been my recommendation to many a person wanting to try out this genre.

However, and as much of a Fangirl I am to this author and her work (and the main character of the Graphic Novel, Ivy Tamwood), I have to outright admit there are some really serious issues with this Graphic Novel adaptation of the world of the Hollows. The author at least was gracious enough to not just wanting to transcribe her already written work into comic book form (Anita Blake and Harry Dresden, I'm looking at you!), something that seldom works right. Instead, she gifted us with a trip into the mind of Ivy (rather than the books' narrator, Rachel) and tells us just how the main duo of the series came to work together and know each other.

Storywise, this might have worked rather well for a novel, or a noveletta -- but in comic form, the most interesting aspects of the tale were subdued or understated. Ivy's feelings (read love) for Rachel happened incredibly abruptly, and even though Rachel here wasn't as incredibly annoying as Mercy Thompson in the "Homecoming" graphic novel (awful awful AWFUL!), she came across as random, whimsical, and annoyingly moralist. And somehow, Ivy seems to be amazingly grateful to have Rachel's abuse. I love the two characters and I adore Rachel, but I really didn't like her in this GN - in the books she's sassy, self assured and a little bit cheeky. Here? She's got mood swings that take her from cutesy to "RANTING BITCH IN YOUR FACE!".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. L. Rutter on 16 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
The seventh instalment in the Hollows series about witch Rachel Morgan and her companions Ivy (vampire) and Jenks (pixy).

I enjoyed this book, but felt that there were certain elements of the plot that dragged on a little bit. The whole banshee story felt tacked on. I thought they were a cool addition to the Inderlanders that inhabit the series, but, since there has been no mention of banshees in any of the other books, this was definitely something that Harrison decided on only recently. I did find as well that the sucking of emotion was much like the sucking of blood from vampires, which means having two such predators in the books. I'm not sure how much mileage Harrison will get out of banshees in future books, but I'm sure we'll be seeing characters such as Holly and the Walker again.

I also didn't like the resolution of the Marshall character. Sure, Rachel is shunned but this guy is talked up as being Rachel's white knight and wanting to save her, so why does he bail? Probably because Pierce is now on the scene... Harrison does like to tidy up the previous chap before Rachel moves onto someone new.

Despite this, there were some lovely moments. Everything to do with the demon Al fascinates me and he is fast becoming one of my favourite literary bad guys. He has a fabulously childish, arrogant, mischievous character that lends itself to some brilliant dialogue and action scenes between him and Rachel. There was also a really spine-tingling moment where Rachel catches sight of him in the back of her car, and remembers that he IS a demon, no matter how he plays up his laissez faire English gentleman.

Jenks is another highlight.
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