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Where the Rainbow Ends
 
 

Where the Rainbow Ends [Kindle Edition]

Jameson Currier
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

This powerful, compelling, and heartfelt first novel centers on Robbie Taylor, an optimistic and romantic young man who settles in New York City in 1978 with a circle of new friends. Where the Rainbow Ends follows Robbie through a personal odyssey into enlightenment, spanning a period of almost fifteen years, from the unabashed revelry of gay Manhattan through a quest for faith, family, and understanding as the AIDS epidemic tests him like a modern-day Job. Currier masterfully weaves an ardent story about the families that we create for ourselves, a story that is at once lyrical, poignant, and sexy.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 712 KB
  • Print Length: 392 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0983285160
  • Publisher: Chelsea Station Editions (19 Dec 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006O4WXI8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #327,868 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
3.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From IMPACT - G.Herren 20 Feb 1999
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
I have easily read over a thousand books, at least, in my life. Only a very few (Pat Conroy's Beach Music and The Lords of Discipline; FelicePicano's Like People in History; Susan Howatch's The Wheel of Fortune) have ever moved me to tears. Jameson Currier's debut novel, Where the Rainbow Ends (Overlook Press, $24.95) moved me to tears more than once and, simply put, is one of the best pieces of gay literature I have ever read.The book covers 1979-93, or 14 years in the life of Robbie Taylor. Robbie is a 19-year-old Georgia boy when the novels opens. He has escaped an abusive, fundamental Christian father and run away to New York to begin his life anew. Robbie is not breath-takingly beautiful, nor does he have a desire to become a model or an actor. He is acarpenter. Once in New York, he befriends Vince, an aspiring playwright who begins to expose him to gay culture and life. Their friendship soonencompasses Denise, an artist beginning to explore her own lesbian nature; Jeff, a beautiful young actor beginning an interesting spiritualquest; and Nathan, who becomes Robbie's lover just before the AIDS epidemic begins sweeping through the gay community with its devastating fury.This book is not just about the AIDS epidemic. It is about gay life and love, and the families we create to provide love and comfort in the darkdays and to celebrate the many joys. Rather than focusing on and wallowing in the heavy melodrama that the AIDS epidemic seems to produce in most writers, Currier shows both the highs and lows. The lives of these incredibly well-drawn, three-dimensional people encompass all of the emotion that is found in gay/lesbian life. The laughter is there, as well as the tears. This book is about creating a sense of family, and most of all, it is about hope. Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a once-in-a-year-book 29 Mar 1999
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
as a regular reader of gay books you once or twice a year discover a book that is worth being kept in the shelves and being reread for several times. not always the "big shots" in gay lit provide us with books like that (holleran, white and even picano failed repeatedly). but here we are again and i must say that the emotional impact of the story and the description of the narrators inner struggle moved me deeply. i can't comment on the language, because english is not my mother language. all i can say is that reading this book i felt like a part of this "family of choice", and saw my own life mirrored in it. thanx to the writer.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling, wonderfully compasionate writing. 8 Jun 1999
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
This compelling, wonderfully compasionate novel by Jameson Currier is a must for anyone attempting to understand the heart and soul of love, loss and recovery in the gay community. Never before have I had the pleasure of becoming so intimately involved with a writers characters that I actually wept -- tears of grief, frustration, anger and finally peace and joy. So closely based upon fact, this book is one you simply cannot read without becoming a better person. I highly recommend it if you dare to touch your own soul and connect with the lives of others.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good story in desperate need of editing. 25 Nov 1998
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
This book tells an archtypal, perhaps even necessary, story of a young man's migration from fanatical, repressive rural Georgia to the playground of late-1970s New York City. I'm subtracting two stars, though, for frequent lapses of continuity, grammatical errors, obvious misspellings, and bizarre narrative tics. Consider the following continuity problem: On page 29, the reader meets Alex, a "stocky man in his mid-fifties." A few pages earlier, the narrator has met Vince, who is 22. (These events are contemporary.) Then, on page 30, the reader finds out that these two men have known each other since Alex was 18 and "Vince was a boy and they had lived in the same apartment building." Huh? By my calculation, Vince's birth occurred some 15 years after Alex's 18th year. On page 23 the reader learns that a certain musical instrument is spelled "symbol"--I'm hoping that spell-check software is responsible for that jewel--and one also has to contend with the narrator's affectation of, well, inserting the word "well" jarringly into every 30th sentence. If you can suppress those English-teacher instincts, the book does tell a good story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars packed with the stuff of life 9 Nov 1998
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Currier is an accomplished short story writer, and it shows in this first novel; the reader repeatedly has a sense of closure, only to experience delighted relief that this is indeed long fiction and the more is to come. Packed with the stuff of life, this rewarding work might be termed a "gay immigrant" novel, a saga about men and women who leave their hometown and families, move to the big cities, and fashion new lives in an alien land. Currier (Dancing on the Moon: Short Stories About AIDS, Viking, 1993) takes his characters from the late 1960s, through the hedonistic 1970s, and into the AIDS-riddled 1980s and politically charged 1990s. Their stores are ones of profound loss -- of biological families, of friends, and of intimate relationships. It's little wonder that Currier draws clear parallels to the story of Job -- the underlying question is one of faith that, on the other side of pain, there is meaning after all. Recommended for public and academic libraries. Roger W. Durbin, University of Akron Library, Ohio Library Journal. October 15, 1998
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars poorly written, complete lack of character development
I waded through the first 1/3 of this book disappointed at first at what a total waste of time the book was. Read more
Published on 9 May 1999
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is a real stinker
Even if the writing weren't clunky (and it is), you would have a hard time getting past the knuckleheaded twerp of a narrator. Read more
Published on 15 Feb 1999
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is a real stinker
Even if the writing weren't clunky (and it is), you would have a hard time getting past the knuckleheaded twerp of a narrator. Read more
Published on 15 Feb 1999
5.0 out of 5 stars A heartfelt and moving story of a gay man coming of age
In beautiful and uncluttered prose, this book manages to tell the very moving story of Robbie Taylor as he arrrives in New York in 1978 and meets the people who will change his... Read more
Published on 26 Dec 1998
5.0 out of 5 stars my vote for a great gay novel
I was astonished by the insight and scope of this book. Jameson Currier has managed to tell the large story of what it is like to be a gay man growing of age in the 1970s and... Read more
Published on 24 Dec 1998
5.0 out of 5 stars An honest,gripping,emotioanlly charged young gay man's story
In beautiful and uncluttered prose, this book manages to tell the very moving story of Robbie Taylor as he arrrives in New York in 1978 and meets the people who will change his... Read more
Published on 19 Dec 1998
5.0 out of 5 stars An unforgettable story of a gay man's survival.
Modern gay history -- the mores and etiquette of dating, sex, coupledom and love from the late 1970s to the present -- is covered in this compelling, heartfelt first novel from... Read more
Published on 21 Oct 1998
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