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Where Am I Going (Digitally Remastered)
 
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Where Am I Going (Digitally Remastered)

14 July 2009 | Format: MP3

£4.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:15
30
2
2:26
30
3
2:41
30
4
2:23
30
5
2:37
30
6
1:54
30
7
2:27
30
8
2:40
30
9
2:05
30
10
3:52
30
11
2:43
30
12
3:41
30
13
2:52
30
14
2:50
30
15
2:34

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 30 Oct. 2006
  • Release Date: 30 Oct. 2006
  • Label: Virgin EMI
  • Copyright: (C) 1998 Mercury Records Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 40:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KUDCCW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 22,229 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Phillysound2 VINE VOICE on 27 April 2008
Format: Audio CD
For me this is Dusty's most accomplished and polished UK album (1967). This is Dusty International Superstar and she's at the top of her game. She's hanging out with Burt Bacharach and Carole King, recording her own show for the BBC and performing in the best venues. If you go up to London's Charing Cross Road you can pop by one of these venues - the London Hippodrome; this used to be London's `Talk of the Town'. You get a sense here of how small London and the cabaret circuit was for stars of Dusty's stature and why the USA (and Memphis) was an inevitable next big step for Dusty. But this album wasn't a hit. Record buyers were changing and Dusty was heading for a bumpy ride.

The album is a showcase for Dusty's talents as she effortlessy sings pop, cabaret classics, ballads, swing, soul, current show-stoppers and even Jaques Brel. The album opens with `Bring Him Back' with its energetic percussive big band arrangement and Dusty's strong and easy vocal (but just try to sing along!). I don't favour Dusty's cabaret style songs ('Come Back to Me') but her version of `Sunny' is terrific. The title track was an impressive surprise for me (I love the `Sweet Charity' soundtrack); Dusty is a master interpreter and makes this her own story (the last notes seem to reference 'There's no Business Like Show Business')- and sings her heart out.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 7 Jun. 2002
Format: Audio CD
This is my favourite Dusty album as it contains so many good tracks. The title track is my favourite version of this song, (the little harp intro makes my heart beat every time) blowing the Dionne Warwick version on 'Promises Promises' out of the water as far as I'm concerned. 'I can't wait until I see my babys face' is amazing as is 'Take me for a little while'. This is the album that got me into Dusty and I would recommend it highly to anyone thinking of purchasing a Dusty LP.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 11 May 2003
Format: Audio CD
The first twelve tracks here made up Dusty's third original album, while the three bonus tracks were recorded at around the same time.
Close to you was eventually recorded by the Carpenters, who had a massive worldwide hit with it, but their version isn't any better than Dusty's, recorded at least three (maybe five) years earlier. Sadly, Dusty's version wasn't released as a single, so we can only wonder at what might have been.
The album also includes stunning covers of Come back to me (from On a clear day you can see forever), Sunny (Bobby Hebb), Don't let me lose this dream (Aretha Franklin) and the often-covered If you go away (originally a French song by Jacques Brel), in which Dusty mixes English and French.
Among the other songs, Broken blossoms is a very emotional song about the futility of war. A lot of anti-war songs were written in the sixties, including Eve of destruction (Barry McGuire) or On the path of glory (Petula), but Broken blossoms is as good as any of tem.
This is certainly one of Dusty's best albums - all the songs are brilliant, including those I've not mentioned specifically - despite the absence of any of Dusty's big hits.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Oct. 2000
Format: Audio CD
Replacing that scratched LP or hearing Dusty for the first time, you won't be dissapointed with this collection of some of her early to mid 60s output. Described as 'outstanding' in the press, that would certainly be a fitting description of the lady herself.
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