Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

When the Fighting is Over: A Personal Story of the Battle for Tumbledown Mountain and Its Aftermath Hardcover – 12 May 1988


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£24.95 £0.01


Product details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; First Edition edition (12 May 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747501742
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747501749
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.6 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 400,905 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By F. Van Doorn on 27 Jan. 2001
Format: Paperback
This book I read from cover to cover in one big breath. Having already seen the film of the book (an excellent film, I should add which unfortunately is not sold anywhere to my knowledge) I didn't really expect the book could move me more than the film. How wrong I was! The book is written by both Robert Lawrence (the guy it all happened to) and his father John Lawrence. Their writing alternates with eachother so that you get a good idea of what the son and the father (parents) are going through at the same time. I thought this book was compelling, often disturbing, but always heartwarming. And with all due respect to the previous reviewer: this book isn't about the Falklands or the British Army, it's about the struggle of a young man who got wounded, fighting for a cause he believed in, then finding out that society didn't care all that much about the victims of war. I also think that Robert Lawrence is a very courageous man, not only during the battle but even more so in trying to pick up the pieces and build up a living again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. Critchlow on 3 Sept. 2006
Format: Paperback
I was informed about this book by one of my good friends father who fought in the battle of 'Tumbledown'. I've read many books on the Falklands, this on stood out and was a great read. I thought it was a extremley accurate account of the Lt Lawence and the difficulties he face whilst trying to establish some form of normality in 'Civiy' street. A true personnel battle of grit and deterimation of a forgotten hero.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By john kuzma on 5 July 2004
Format: Paperback
The book, by halves, is very much a worthwhile read and an insight into a proud, loving English family. Yet the father in his various accounts comes across as a pompous socialite who expects a destructive English class structure to be adhered to. Nevertheless I do have a glowing admiration for his honesty and total devotion to his family and nation. Roberts' account throughout the book is at times gut wrenching. His heart felt words painted a picture of true grit, bravery and a strength of character that a Military Cross is only a small token of.

Robert should be a hero not only in Britain but a hero of mankind, survival and justice. Throughout life you learn of great accomplishments yet when a person survives the harrowing, physical and mental disfigurements of war nobody, it seems, wants to know. People like Robert are the real Conquerors of lifes' Everests. As the eye finds it difficult to accept what is before it, so the character of one must close that person out of its self centred world. It's a sad reflection on the society of today.So many politicians struggle to be the leaders of countries; here was a platoon leader acknowledging his responsibilities only to be ignored and deserted by those self righteous who sent the young off to war.
They say a true hero doesn't need to write a saga to convey the tials and tribulations, the accomplishments and achievements. This book definitely proves a lot can be said in a few words. If this book had only been written by Robert it would have had a greater reaction and a listing high in the memoirs of wartime success stories. On the other hand if the father had not written his contribution the full story would never have been known. The name dropping and throwing off people like a dirty rag are rather egotistical and abhorrent.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "bankrobber" on 4 Nov. 2002
Format: Paperback
A trully heart-wrenching book. The closest comparison that one can come up with is Ron Kovic's equally amazing "Born on the fourth of July". However, be warned that whilst Robert's parts are the highlights, insightful, interesting and even funny, his father John's tendency to litter his passages with prayers for his wounded son do begin to grate the reader a little and, i am sorry to say are even a little embarassing.
On the whole, however, this book should be recommended to anybody with an intest in modern warfare and especially to any one wishing to join the army of this "great" nation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 April 2000
Format: Paperback
Whilst one must appreciate the pain Robert Lawrence has gone through after he was shot in the head during the Battle for Mount Tumbledown, his father and himself have not written a very enthralling book. Little is spent on the battle, and the majority is of this person's struggle with issues with the army, which unfortunately do not make good, interesting reading. John Lawrence simply repeats the same line about a prayer to god over and over again which gets extremeley tedious after about the fifth time. There are far better Falkland Island and British Army examples.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback