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Wheelmen: Lance Armstrong, the Tour de France, and the Greatest Sports Conspiracy Ever Paperback – Jul 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Gotham Books; Reprint edition (July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592408885
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592408887
  • Product Dimensions: 15.4 x 2.3 x 23.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 211,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Captivating (The Economist)

A detailed account of Armstrong's eventual descent into disgrace (Guardian) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Book Description

The first in-depth look at Lance Armstrong's doping scandal, the phenomenal business success built on the back of fraud, and the greatest conspiracy in the history of sport. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By dim on 11 Oct 2013
Format: Hardcover
It's always difficult for me to judge books on Armstrong, whether they contain something new, whether they will interest the ardent fan who knows the ins and outs of the sport, as I'm someone who has followed the Armstrong saga very closely for coming on 15 years. Last years "Secret Race" from Coyle and Hamilton, for me provided no surprises, nothing shocked me, but the depth of the detail, the anecdotes kept me hooked and in many ways Wheelmen is the same.

Wheelmen isn't just about Armstrong, and it isn't just about doping. Instead it attempts, and suceeds, in painting a full picture of the entire story. From the late seventies, through the 1984 Olympics with Eddie B defecting from Poland, it introduces Thom Weisel in detail, the formation of the first US Pro team 7-Eleven, through the creation of Subaru-Montgomery and eventually US Postal. It covers the whole story, the team structure, the coaches, the financiers, the sponsors.

Where "Secret Race" covered the story from the point of view of the rider, "Wheelmen" covers it from the other side, the structure, how everything came about and ultimately how everything collapsed. The two compliment each other perfectly and if you own both you are unlikely to need to buy another Lance book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By iw on 13 Jan 2014
Format: Hardcover
This is an outstanding piece of work by two real (investigative) journalists from the Wall Street Journal. I emphasise real because, with the notable exception of David Walsh at The Sunday Times, most sports journalists are sycophants, held back by a tendency to hero-worship their subjects. Also, they need to keep friendly with the sports stars (and the business people behind them)in order to get access for the interviews their editors are looking for. With Wheelmen, the writers' focus is on exposing what really went on, in what must be the biggest ever rip-off in sporting history of fans, sponsors and event organisers. What the Wheelmen authors found, and report on here, reads like a thriller. I doubt that either of them got a Christmas card from Mr Armstrong, on any of his co-conspirators, though.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Anna M on 17 Jan 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read a few accounts of the rise and fall of Lance Armstrong and this one is my favourite. It's well-written, it synthesises info from a lot of different sources, and it cites the sources at the end. It's a compelling read, too. This is definitely the Armstrong account I recommend.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By BRIAN JTABER on 27 Nov 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
David Walsh's books give an excellent account of the cycling side of the Armstrong saga. Wheelmen gives a detailed account of the growth and size of the financial and business involvment in the case. It shows how many wealthy and influential companies and individuals had a vested interest maintaining Armstrong's 'perfect image' and their reluctance to face the growing concerns over how his and his teams success was achieved. It shows the willingness of individuals and companies were prepared to sacrifice the reputation and businesses of the whistleblowers to maintain their 'in' with the Armstrong clique. Well worth a read, in conjunction with the David Walsh and others books covering the same subject.
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By Stella TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Aug 2014
Format: Paperback
It's hard not to judge Mr Armstrong. He has been labeled as a bully and a cheat and it's hard to imagine a cycling fan who doesn't have an opinion on the doping scandal that surrounds him. Even those with little interest in the sport have been drawn into the debate. The excuse that 'everyone else was doing it too' is quite frankly, unacceptable. For an athlete in his position as a role model and sporting icon there is just no excuse that would ever be acceptable. There are always two sides to every story though and I wanted to read this to see this whole sorry mess from the other side.

The Secret Race focused on things from the riders' viewpoint, but with Wheelmen we get to fill in more of the blanks and see things from the outside looking in. It seems that everyone has an opinion on this and the interviewee's didn't hold back. Not surprisingly the anti doping crowd have a lot to say here but it's all the little anecdotes and views of the people not usually heard from that make this book worth reading. The wives of team mates, ex girlfriends, retired riders, cycling officials, close family... The cast of characters is lengthy. Overall, it still doesn't paint Lance in a better light (it's hard to imagine anything that could do that) but if nothing else it does highlight the motivation behind his actions.

For anyone who has been following the scandal (or Lance's career) there will be quite a bit here that has already been covered in other places, but there were just enough new details and interviews to hold my interest. It feels almost voyeuristic reading about someone's fall from grace in such detail but it makes for gripping reading.

Do I feel any different about Lance after reading this?
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard Butterfield on 3 Nov 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read most of the other published work around Armstrong and the USPS team, including Hamilton's book. This book fills in all of the gaps by inserting a inputs from a number of other interviews, many of which have been published in the WSJ.

This book certainly majors on the business side of LA's life, and gives a good insight into the magnitude of the sums involved. All in all, this is perhaps the most complete review of the rise and fall of LA, though its objectivity can make it seem a little soulless at times.
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