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Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not Original recording

4.2 out of 5 stars 391 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not
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Product details

  • Audio CD (23 Jan. 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording
  • Label: Domino Recording
  • ASIN: B000BTDMDC
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (391 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 324 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
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Product Description

Product Description

Containing thirteen tracks including the hit single "I Bet That You Look Good on the Dancefloor", Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not is a remarkable modern British debut. The first album from Sheffield-based rockers, Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not was the fastest selling debut album in UK chart history.

BBC Review

Over three years on from the bomb-in-your-pocket blast of Arctic Monkeys’ introduction to the mainstream – two consecutive number one singles, and a chart-conquering debut album, represents quite the eruption from the blocks – it’s only by considering the pair of long-players that have followed it that one can begin to find relative fault with the Sheffield band’s first foray into audience affections.

With hindsight, 2006’s Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not lacks both the acerbic edge of its fairly immediate successor Favourite Worst Nightmare – released just 15 months later – and the sense of completeness conveyed by their most recent, Josh Homme-assisted affair, Humbug. But the same – that the debut doesn’t match its follow-up releases – could be said of many a domestic indie success: Radiohead’s Pablo Honey is an embarrassment placed beside the superlative structures of The Bends, and Pulp didn’t hit their stride until fourth effort, His ‘n’ Hers. Granted, Oasis have perhaps never bettered Definitely Maybe, but they’re the exception to what’s otherwise a fairly established rule.

Exuding the ramshackle character of their preceding (freely distributed) demo material, much of Whatever People Say… flows at a rambunctious pace, its players’ shortcomings at the time masked by an infectious energy – listening back, it’s the spirit of When the Sun Goes Down and I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor that nailed them to our hearts, not any particular compositional flair (Alex Turner’s John Cooper Clark-indebted lyricism aside). With their innocent faces but wicked tongues, the Arctics were always a commercial proposition in waiting; Domino’s success in signing them sped the process up, but it’s hard to imagine a world without these songs finding a sizeable audience, label assistance or not.

The album’s clearest hooks are broad enough to cover several sub-genre bases, while the spiky riffs appeal instantly to punk-minded indie kids after something with true bite – especially after the likes of Keane and (modern era) Snow Patrol took the torch passed by Radiohead et al and proceeded to dampen it down to a smouldering shadow of its former self. Today’s definition of what passes for an indie band has everything to do with this album: it redefined one’s musical lexicon, pinching from the past but resolutely contemporary with its tales, however faked, of young-adult-eye-level social minutiae. 

And it’s for its legacy, rather than actual content, that Whatever People Say… warrants categorising as a classic of its era. Its roots might not stretch deep, but branches continue to sprout forth from its frame --Mike Diver

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
At 51, I am surely not the type of listener the Arctic Monkeys were aiming for. But, having heard Johnnie Walker play the track "Mardy Bum" and being wowed by it, I got a young colleague to lend me his copy of the album. It's wonderful. On first hearing, my "elderly" ears were about to dismiss it as a row, then the lyrics got through. I think Alex Turner is as excellent a spokesman for his generation as Ray Davies, Paul Weller and Noel Gallagher before him. Much more appropriate (and clever) than the whingeing of the likes of James Blunt. A superb album.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Probably one of the best albums ever released, certainly in the top five of this century. As much as I love the Arctic Monkey's later sounds, there's something raw and very British about their first album which is never quite seen again.
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Format: Vinyl
I'm probably in the biggest target target audience for this (late teen) but despite all the hype surrounding it along with all the criticism, I can't really see where most of the criticism comes from. If you're not into indie-rock then yes, you probably won't like the Arctic Monkey's debut particularly, but you're missing the point. The album is fulled with a bunch of fun and funky tunes with stories layered on top. Alex Turner, whilst his voice isn't as developed as say Humbug, adds to the rawness and feel of the record. The guitars and bass work well together to bring some neat tunes to the album, and the hard-hitting drumming is very well done, particularly on the album opener, "The View From The Afternoon".
My main gripe with this album is that each track isn't particularly different from each other, in terms of tone.

I ordered the Vinyl of this because I knew the CD wasn't very well mastered, and the large gate and sleeve is a nice addition to anyone's collection. The vinyl sounds allot nicer to my ears than the CD, with more smooth and audible bass, although there is still some compression applied.
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Format: Audio CD
I have been very skeptical about how many bands have been hyped up in the last few years and failed to deliever. However, yesterday I walked into Fop in Sheffield, heared two songs, and bought the album.
The music of the Arctic Monkeys brilliantly ashrines the energy of bluesy-rock, cascading the professionalism of the 22 20s in favour of a down to earth and strictly personal account of life. The guitar work with a multitude of diverse and unpredictable clean-toned riffs, rhythms and solos is something Razorlight would be proud of, and shows exceptional musical maturity.
Finally, the vocalist's vigour and personality in devling into youthful tales of beer, birds, and clubs, is very refreshing.
Precisely because of the band's modesty and so stated lack of spoecific intention to hit the big time,the album is competely self-confident. In this sense, Alex Turner's vcoal swager earns it right of comparison to Liam Gallagher's rugged 'attitude'.
This album may be tainted by cynics of commericalisation...but at the end of day, the public demand, want, and expect great music.Does buying this record make me a trendy bankwagon-jumping NME swot? Probably, even though I don't read it very often, but I don't care because I just bought a great record.
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Format: Audio CD
Now, don't believe all the negative reviews. So yes, the guitarist may not be Slash, and the singer might not be up to that standard of Matt Bellamy, but hey. These tunes are as catchy as ever, and the drumming, I think, is rather great. When the sun goes down is very good with the quiet bits at the start and end, and a fabulous main section. Dancing Shoes, once again is a good ol' fun singalong song!

Definitely recommended, and showing a lot of promise.
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By A Customer on 17 Jan. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Putting raw talent aside, what makes the Arctic Monkeys stand out? They have that rare, precious ability to appeal to all ages. I'm 49 but they make me feel 18 again. Great lyrics about small town teens touch on universal themes. And that amazing voice could do for Sheffield what The Beatles did for Liverpool. This is a great first album
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Format: Audio CD
Even before listening to their music, this band is interesting in two respects: their age (all members were 19-20 y.o. when the album was released in January 2006) and the way their songs became popular even before the release of their first album through demo tapes and, more importantly, file-sharing on the net. As a result, not only were people able to sing along during their gigs before the songs were officially published, but their album was the fastest sale for a debut album in the UK. Some critics however pointed out that they have also beneficiated from a strong support by the highly influential music magazine NME, earning them the label of "NME band". They've refused to appear on UK television since late 2005 or at prizes ceremonies, like the Brit Awards, adding to the controversy surrounding them

Anyway, once you strip away the hype, what's left? Well, I'd say a pretty decent first album, which musical landscape is a bit of a "the Clash meet Trainspotting", combining a sound bordering on the punk rock of the former with a contagious, albeit sometimes unfocused, youthful energy and lyrics reflecting the realities of working class life but devoid of the strong political positions ever present with Joe Strummer. With more than half the songs running below 3 minutes, and only two above four, it is extremely fast-paced.
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