Start reading What about Darwin? on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
What about Darwin?
 
 

What about Darwin? [Kindle Edition]

Thomas F. Glick
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £15.50
Kindle Price: £14.72 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £0.78 (5%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £14.72  
Paperback £15.50  
Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deal: At least 60% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price--for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deal or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deal Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Purchase any Kindle Book sold by Amazon.co.uk and receive £1 credit to try out our Digital Music Store. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Product Description

Review

An invaluable source book on the reactions of important thinkers to Darwin's ideas and to the man himself. In addition, [Glick] has created an entertaining volume that lends itself to browsing and to sparking unlikely connections.

(Choice)

Wonderful nuggets of information can be gleaned from What about Darwin?, a splendid compilation of opinions of the great (and not so great) who read Darwin's works. This volume is terrific fun. Like Tennyson, get two copies; one for yourself and one to put on the side table in the guest bedroom.

(Michael Ruse Quarterly Review of Biology)

What about Darwin? is a simply delightful book to browse through.

(Glenn Branch Reports of the National Center for Science Education)

Review

An invaluable source book on the reactions of important thinkers to Darwin's ideas and to the man himself. In addition, [Glick] has created an entertaining volume that lends itself to browsing and to sparking unlikely connections.

(Choice 2012)

Wonderful nuggets of information can be gleaned from What about Darwin?, a splendid compilation of opinions of the great (and not so great) who read Darwin's works. This volume is terrific fun. Like Tennyson, get two copies; one for yourself and one to put on the side table in the guest bedroom.

(Michael Ruse Quarterly Review of Biology )

What about Darwin? is a simply delightful book to browse through.

(Glenn Branch Reports of the National Center for Science Education )

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 964 KB
  • Print Length: 552 pages
  • Publisher: JHUP (24 July 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003X4L58Q
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
3.5 out of 5 stars
3.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Darwin-Spotters' Almanac-cum-Groupies' Guide 1 Feb 2011
Format:Paperback
This curious compendium has proved quite a hit Stateside, where 'Darwin wars' still rage. Does what it says on the tin, but in alphabetical order, so it's probably more of a browser or a 'reference', as Americans would say, but comprehensive it ain't (well, natch); in fact, HOW candidates were selected (do many freethinkers, or 'controversialists' as they were known in the old DNB, get in?) is not exactly clear (happenstance would appear to play a large part, or who you knew, which penalises loners) and one feels the editor is more distracted, lepidopterist-style, by the mere sighting of the Darwin name than by the more laborious tracking of his ideas. Which of course antedate him in any case (see Giorgio Barsanti's masterful anthology In Camicia (Stripped Down - from Montaigne II.12), unfortunately not translated; an enterprising publisher could do this with relative ease, since the greater part of the book, which stretches from Lucretius to Elton John, has been translated INTO Italian) and can be summed up in one word: mutability. In the present work, though, there is a voyeuristic emphasis on 'Darwin the man', doubly curious because, in the editor's own words, 'he is UNIFORMLY described as kind, gentle, good, and, of course, very intelligent'. Tell us something we don't know, Prof! Or are we seeing the patristic stirrings of Charles's elevation to sainthood, to sit alongside the even more revered Einstein? He is merely the conduit or popularizer, remember - it is the ideas that count - NOT, by all that's holy, the networking! And a cut-off point is nowhere mentioned; we are in principle dealing with Darwin's lifetime, yet I note Isaac Bashevis Singer(b.1902) - what this is about is nowhere explained (unless it's 'Darwin's lifetime or otherwise out of copyright'?) So all in all a fun, but rather eccentric, enterprise that comes ready-peppered with distracting (and redundant) asterisks. For idolators, completists and worshippers at the shrine - who will really enjoy it!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars A collection of opinions about Darwinism 22 Jun 2010
Format:Kindle Edition
This is a collection of opinions expressed by key figures in the history about Darwin's theory of evolution, which reflects on how his theory touched their minds and hearts. Darwin influenced a very wide range of people from all fields. Examples include; Pope Pius IX, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Mahatma Gandhi, President Abraham Lincoln, President Theodore Roosevelt, President Woodrow Wilson, Lenin, Stalin, John Maynard Keynes, Bertrand Russell, Charles Dickens, and many others. Many were Darwin's enemies, some ridiculed his theory, and many became evolutionists. The Wilberforce - Huxley debate at Oxford in July 1860 was a turning point in the acceptance of Darwinism in England. Most of the elite had been won over in first few months of his publication, "On the origin of species."

A summary of some of the comments of his admirers and his critics are as follows: I very much like physicist Ernst Mach's criticism of Darwin in which he observes that if preservation of species had been more important than adaptation, struggle for survival, and evolution; then species would move in a vicious circle like "perpetual motion" in physics. Albert Einstein provides a cautionary note in his opinion that human beings should not confuse the struggle for survival as a justification to dominate another human being for economic reasons. Einstein praises the depth of Darwin's investigation into the natural history of life. German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche presents a notoriously anti-English, and highly critical of Darwin's theory, and uses the word "mediocre spirit" and "mediocre Englishman" few times in his criticism.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  22 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not What I Expected 22 Jun 2010
By George P. Wood - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
What I hoped this book would be is a sort of "Bartlett's Darwin Quotations," containing both friendly and hostile quotes about the man and his theory. As such, the book would be a useful compendium for writers looking for a piquant quote to make their point. Unfortunately, my hope for this book is unrealized.

"What about Darwin?" is indeed a book of quotes about Darwin by friendly and hostile sources, but its usefulness lies elsewhere. If you are a historian looking into the reception-history of Darwin's ideas, as well as primary sources describing the man, this is the first book you need to read. Glick organizes the quotes by last name and puts an asterix next to the names of people quoted elsewhere in the text. This allows the reader to uncover the social networks in 19th-century England and North America that helped disseminate Darwin's ideas, and critiques of those ideas.

Unfortunately, in my opinion, many of the quotes have little usefulness beyond that limited purpose. Take, for example, the entry on P.T. Barnum. Barnum, described as an "American Circus Impressario," was eminently quotable. Glick doesn't quote Barnum on Darwin, however. He quotes George Templeton Strong and an advertisement about Barnum's "What is IT?" exhibit, as well as the April 18, 1873, issue of the "Brooklyn Eagle" on Barnum's contribution to natural history. As illustration of reception-history, these quotes work well to show how Darwin's ideas were transmitted to and perceived by popular culture. But what else is a writer to make of Strong's quote: "Stopped at Barnum's on my way downtown to see the much advertised non-descript, the 'What-is-it.' [...] The creature's [...] anatomical details are fearfully simian, and he's a great fact for Darwin"?

There are far better quote's in the book, of course. But there's also a lot of this stuff.

As I said, these quotes are useful for a very narrow purpose. But if you're a writer looking for something like "Bartlett's Darwin Quotations," this is not the book for you.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A collection of opinions about Darwinism 18 May 2010
By Rama Rao - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is a collection of opinions expressed by key figures in the history about Darwin's theory of evolution, which reflects on how his theory touched their minds and hearts. Darwin influenced a very wide range of people from all fields. Examples include; Pope Pius IX, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Mahatma Gandhi, President Abraham Lincoln, President Theodore Roosevelt, President Woodrow Wilson, Lenin, Stalin, John Maynard Keynes, Bertrand Russell, Charles Dickens, and many others. Many were Darwin's enemies, some ridiculed his theory, and many became evolutionists. The Wilberforce - Huxley debate at Oxford in July 1860 was a turning point in the acceptance of Darwinism in England. Most of the elite had been won over in first few months of his publication, "On the origin of species."

A summary of some of the comments of his admirers and his critics are as follows: I very much like physicist Ernst Mach's criticism of Darwin in which he observes that if preservation of species had been more important than adaptation, struggle for survival, and evolution; then species would move in a vicious circle like "perpetual motion" in physics. Albert Einstein provides a cautionary note in his opinion that human beings should not confuse the struggle for survival as a justification to dominate another human being for economic reasons. Einstein praises the depth of Darwin's investigation into the natural history of life. German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche presents a notoriously anti-English, and highly critical of Darwin's theory, and uses the word "mediocre spirit" and "mediocre Englishman" few times in his criticism. Physicist Werner Heisenberg observes that evolution of a complex molecular structure from simple molecules needs not only the laws of physics and chemistry but also the key concepts of evolution enunciated by Darwin. Clergyman Henry Beecher was the first minister of a Christian church in United States to accept Darwin's theory as the truthful description of natural history, and he is known to have used his sermon on March 11, 1860 to express his support. But the opposition in church was also widespread. Evangelist Billy Sunday ridiculed Darwin's theory of evolution and called fellow scientists who support Darwin as "feeble minded." He called Christians who believe in evolution are essentially nonbelievers of the Word of God.

The Darwin's correspondence project ([...]) and the Darwin online ([...]) also provide useful info about numerous Darwin's letters. At the end of the book, having read 442 criticisms, the reader gets an idea of how much his theory stirred the minds of people. It also gives a picture of various aspects of his life, his work, and his personality. Recently there have been many reports suggesting that Darwin's family had ill effects of inbreeding, but in spite of his poor health conditions and personal tragedies, Darwin had lasting effect on the way we think about our origin and our natural history.

1. The Origin Of Species: 150th Anniversary Edition
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Another book afloat on the Darwin wave... 16 May 2010
By Eric C. Sedensky - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
As well-researched, carefully thought out, and jam packed as this book is, I thought I would like it a lot more, or at least, I thought I would read through the whole thing. (Disclaimer: I did not.) But, I feel that this book would really have been a lot more interesting, or at least readable, had it been organized in a different fashion. Unfortunately, Mr. Glick has gone to all the trouble of finding a bunch of funny, intriguing, thought-provoking, debate-inducing comments concerning Darwin and his theories, then simply put them in alphabetical order of the people who made the various pronouncements. This makes the book almost unreadable, despite the thorough cross-referencing intended for the reader who wishes to follow a specific path. (I tried it; it makes for tedious, cumbersome reading.) I would have preferred to see the comments arranged in chapters based around specific themes or types of comments. That would have made the book flow. Then, the author could just put an index at the back for the reader who wished to cover things by speaker/writer instead of subject. In fact, even a chronological arrangement would have been more interesting, as that would have allowed the reader to see how the perception and influence of Darwin and his theories changed over the years. As it is, it feels like the author is trying to capitalize on the ongoing debate between creationism and evolution by cobbling this book together and throwing it into the mix. I will say: the subject matter is interesting enough that I'm sure it will serve as a great reference manual or waiting room book in some biology professor's office, but I found it unreadable in any other context.

If you are more into the theory and the current controversy of evolution versus creationism, check out The Selfless Gene: Living with God and Darwin. It has a lot of new viewpoints to bring to the discussion of God and creationists versus evolution and scientists.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best viewed as a reference 23 April 2010
By David Wolf - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is not a book that one would likely enjoy by reading from cover to cover. As the other reviews have noted, this is an A-Z reference book that takes snippets or writings from various characters that have talked about Darwin and his work, whether positive or negative. There are some gems, but there is perhaps more useless information than useful. As such, this may be a great reference book for your bookshelf (or perhaps a restroom item), not necessarily a page-turner.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reference material if that's what you're looking for 10 April 2010
By buru buru piggu - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I was mistakenly expecting this book to be a history of Darwinian thought and a discussion of the debate surrounding his revolutionary ideas, to be read from front to back like a normal book. Instead, it is a reference book/anthology of quotes, arranged alphabetically by the author's last name. As such, it's not very useful for a lay audience to read in a linear fashion and is more suited towards academic uses. In it is an exhaustive collection of quotes and references, from Darwin's contemporaries up to the present day, written by peers, novelists, political leaders, etc, including Mao Zedong and Mahatma Gandhi. For each person listed, a description is given of who they are as well as the years of their life.

Some entries are very short (a paragraph). Most are about a page or a page and a half. Some entries are not directly about Darwin or his ideas at all. They just mention his name in passing, but are included. For example, one noblewoman talks about how he was invited to stay as a guest and stunk up the house boiling down a specimen for its bones. Mao's entry is an excerpt of speech or text about how to handle contradictions within the Communist party and only mentions Darwin's name once. It's not about Darwin.

For students and scholars doing research on Darwin's life, this book is extremely helpful. If I were writing a research paper, this would be one of the first places I'd look for material. For a lay audience, you may find the book to be very dry and of limited use.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category