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What I Saw: Reports from Berlin 1920-33 Paperback – 22 Apr 2011


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What I Saw: Reports from Berlin 1920-33 + The Radetzky March + The Emperor's Tomb
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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Granta (22 April 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847081975
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847081971
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 147,195 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Roth's reports form Weimar-era Berlin capture in diamond-glitter prose the booming, brash capital. Here they are returned to life for English-language readers in Michael Hoffmann's splendid translation. --Boyd Tonkin, Independent

About the Author

Joseph Roth's (1894-1939) books include The Legend of the Holy Drinker, Right and Left, The Emperor's Tomb, The String of Pearis and The Radetzky March Michael Hofmann is a poet. As a translator his work includes Kafka's The Man who Disappeared (Amerika). He has also translated Joseph Roth's The Legend of the Holy Drinker, Right and Left and The String of Pearls.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Ryder on 8 Aug 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Joseph Roth is perhaps undeservedly obscure to readers in English, though I'd be interested to know if he's still popular in Austria and Germany. Here is a collection of newspaper reports on life in Berlin through the Weimar years ('feuilleton') published for German readers at the time. They read as slightly less fanciful, brief snippets of life in the capital along the lines of Isherwood, and bring alive an era that fascinates arguably as much for its bookends of Imperial and Nazi Germany as for anything that happened inter-war.

Roth was an Austrian Jewish author who saw clearly the vainglory, disaffection and fanaticism around him and predicted the direction of political life; he died an alcoholic, in exile in Paris in 1939, having published many articles and a series of novels, of which 'The Radetzky March' is the most acclaimed. This is a relatively short collection and an openly subjective one, with a strong flavour of Roth's dryly comic style and his novelist's eye for detail. It reads almost as a time capsule, compiled by an observant, insightful recorder of one of the most vibrant, dangerous times and places in 20th Century history.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Roth's journalistic style is utterly polished. Gently humourous, immensely descriptive but with fantastic economy, and eminently readable. It is a fascinating study of the times.
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