What Richard Did 2012

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(16) IMDb 6.3/10
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What Richard Did follows Richard Karlsen, golden-boy athlete and undisputed alpha-male of his privileged set of South Dublin teenagers, through the summer between the end of school and the beginning of university. The world is bright and everything seems possible, until in one summer night Richard does something that destroys it all and shatters the lives of the people closest to him. Featuring extraordinary performances from its mainly young cast, What Richard Did is a quietly devastating study of a boy confronting the gap between who he thought he was and who he proves to be.

Starring:
Jack Reynor, Roisin Murphy
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 25 minutes
Starring Jack Reynor, Roisin Murphy, Sam Keeley
Director Lenny Abrahamson
Genres Drama
Studio FUSION MEDIA SALES
Rental release 15 April 2013
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 25 minutes
Starring Jack Reynor, Roisin Murphy, Sam Keeley
Director Lenny Abrahamson
Genres Drama
Studio FUSION MEDIA SALES
Rental release 15 April 2013
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K. Gordon TOP 500 REVIEWER on 6 May 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This film seems to confirm and amplify Abrahamson's (Adam & Paul, Garage) considerable strengths as a film-maker, and,
to a lesser extent his frustrating weaknesses.

On the plus side, he is great with his actors, both in who he casts and what he gets out of them. His characters always feel
complex and real. He also sets up very convincing, morally ambiguous worlds, situations and people. No easy heroes and
villains.

But he also has a tendency to be drawn to melodramatic twists, and those actually make his films less interesting, not more,
as it feels like he's trying to force the emotional issues.

In many ways my favorite part of the film was the first 45 minutes before the central incident. Abrahamson excells at observing
and capturing the complexities of late teen-age life with subtlety and a fresh eye. These aren't the desperate angry street kids
of poverty, nor are they the morally bankrupt idiots we often see upper-class kids portrayed as. They feel real; they drink, but
they're not all alcoholics and stoners. They have sex, but more often than not it's attached to some sense of emotion, at graspings
towards being in a relationship. Their parents are flawed but trying. Its people as people, not just symbols, even though subtle
issues of class and social standing inform the whole story.

But when it gets to the big twists and the big themes, I felt it laboring more, working at it's effects instead of letting them happen.
Its not that the 2nd half isn't good,its that it lacks the power the set up and situation seems to promise. It sticks to it's ambiguity,
but that starts to feel just a touch like an intellectual conceit, not an exploration of darker human truths.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Dooley TOP 50 REVIEWER on 3 May 2013
Format: DVD
This is a film from Ireland that introduces us to Richard Karlsen (Jack Reynor) who is the lad who has it all. Good at sport, all the girls fancy him, his parents are cool and he is even intelligent. The sort of guy that made you green with envy at school. He also has a girlfriend in Lara (Roisin Murphy) and his parents are so rich they have a holiday home. Unfortunately it is on the beach outside Dublin, so no need for the Factor 30 here but possible need for `wind smear', `drizzle cream' or `gloom juice'.

He has loads of mates who of course all look up to him, and the youngsters all want to bathe in the glow of his reflected love and glory. Then things take a turn for the sinister, when jealousy rears its' ugly head at one the `cool `parties things go very wrong, very quick. What follows will strip away the social veneers of a life of privilege and show him up for what he truly is.

Now I actually enjoyed this independent effort but there are a few issues with it. It can be a bit slow in places where a more heavyweight cast could have carried it, but it just seems to wallow a bit. Then there is the music, and being Irish there is no excuse for not having a cracking sound track, but we have lots of plinky, plonky xylophone type stuff, which is just plain grating. The main performances are really solid and Jack Reynor actually seems to age during the process which is a testament to him and direction from Malcolm Campbell. There are a few loose ends too, but overall this was quite memorable and I love independent cinema and the fact that they are prepared to take risks, so I may be being generous but I think this is actually well above being just OK, hence my rating.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sindri on 14 May 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Irish screenwriter and director Lenny Abrahamson`s third feature film which was written by UK screenwriter Malcolm Campbell, is inspired by a novel from 2008 called "Bad Day in Black Rock" by Irish author Kevin Power. It premiered in Ireland, was screened in the Contemporary World Cinema section at the 37th Toronto International Film Festival in 2012, was shot on location in Ireland and is an Irish production which was produced by Irish producer Ed Guiney. It tells the story about a widely held, sociable, responsible and outgoing 18-year-old student named Richard Karlsen who lives with his father, who has his future all figured out and who is spending his summer with his companions.

Subtly and intimately directed by Irish filmmaker Lenny Abrahamson, this quietly paced fictional tale which is narrated mostly from the protagonist`s point of view, draws an unsettling and rarely afflicting portrayal of a prototypical son who, as the title suggests, does something that changes him and his relationship with his family and friends. While notable for its naturalistic milieu depictions, sterling cinematography by cinematographer David Grennan, production design by production designer Stephanie Clerkin and use of sound, this character-driven story where an athlete from a wealthy background befriends a female student named Lara who is attached to an outsider named Conor depicts an internal study of character where so little is said and so much is going on, and contains a fine score by composer Stephen Rennicks.
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