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What Color is Your Parachute? 2010: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers Paperback – 1 Aug 2009

104 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press (1 Aug. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580089879
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580089876
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.9 x 22.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 400,190 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

RICHARD N. BOLLES has led the career development field for more than thirty-five years. A member of Mensa and the Society for Human Resource Management, he has been the keynote speaker at hundreds of conferences. Bolles was trained in chemical engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and holds a bachelor’s degree cum laude in physics from Harvard University, a master’s in sacred theology from General Theological (Episcopal) Seminary in New York City, and three honorary doctorates. He lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with his wife, Marci.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

88 of 88 people found the following review helpful By T. Preston on 17 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A quick review to say that, while I love this book - I borrowed a very old copy and was really inspired by it, so decided to get the most up to date version - I sent this particular one back as it is missing a lot of what helped me in the previous editions.

It's a 'hard times' edition for the recession, and as such is streamlined and very practically focussed, with punchy chapters on e.g. interview advice, CVs etc. That may be just perfect for a lot of people but what I bought the book for was the really (for me anyway) helpful chapters that talk about what sort of thing you want to do with your life, with advice and exercises to help you think about your values and goals; just what I need at a time when i'm trying to re-think my career. In the 2010 edition this is largely absent, save for a brief chapter at the end, so it wasn't for me and i'll probably try and get the 2009 edition intead, but if you're looking for very practical jobhunting advice, this could be helpful - as long as you remember it's very US-focussed.
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48 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Pittam VINE VOICE on 4 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book on the recommendation of a friend but had low expectations. I thought it was going to be a jobs manual related mainly to the USA. How wrong I was.

This book addresses the task of finding a new job in such a detailed, thorough way that it could more properly be called a life review. In fact, the author suggests you do treat unemployment as a chance for a life review, and fully appreciates how hard that can be. It contains the kind of chapters one might expect: How to find Hope, Seven Secrets about the Jobs Market Today, The Best and Worst Ways to Look for Jobs, Life/Work Planning - Planning a Campaign of Attack, Understanding Yourself, Social Media, Five Ways to Change Career, CV Tips, How to Deal with Problems on Your CV, Starting Your Own Business.

I particularly like the fact that all the statistics, and there are many, are clearly backed up by referenced figures. For example, the fact that looking for employers' job postings on the internet has only a 4-10% success rate. This was a complete revelation to me.

The author shows deep understanding about how it actually feels to be unemployed and makes sensible practical suggestions. For example, this is the right time to keep fit, even if you can only afford to run; this is the right time to keep your place tidy, and not to live in chaos; this is the right time to catch up on our reading, perhaps especially anything that might help in your job search, but keeping your mind open avoids that 'I'm a sad victim of redundancy' syndrome.

There's an entire section on the spiritual aspects of tackling unemployment, which the author leaves you to apply to the rest of the book if you choose.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Richard Tod on 26 April 2008
Format: Paperback
In 38 years I have had 16 jobs and 5 career paths trying to find something I liked. (sacked and won my tribunal once and redundant once) This book was great for three things.

1. Makes you really think about what you want to be when you grow up.
2. Focuses your attention on where you are going
3. Does not try to say it has the answers but puts the responsibility clearly on your shoulders where it belongs.

If you are looking for an easy way to find a job then don't buy the book. If you are looking for a real, practical guide to improving your life then buy it, get into the spirit of it and work at it.

No book has all the answers, you do, this book just makes you realise it.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Smith on 11 Nov. 2005
Format: Paperback
This book, as it states in the preface, is written in incredibly simple language. The basic idea of the book is to help people navigate through the difficult process of deciding how to make changes in their life, be they small (traditional job hunt) or potentially overwhelming (life changing job hunt).
Mr Bolles' idiosyncratic style is endearing, and it is very easy to relate to. His basic message is this: the better an idea you get in your head of where what and who you love, and how you love going about things, and therefore what you want... the greater, proportionately, is your chance of getting it.
The book is packed with interesting exercises to get you thinking about these things and a step by step easy to follow (and back up plan endowed, thank you very much) set of instructions for how to go about getting what you want. (Hard work is a prerequisite, unfortunately, but Bolles provides interesting statistics on where that hard work is best targetted, and how to keep yourself motivated in a life changing situation which so often has many of us chucking away our dreams and plumping for the easy option. DON'T DO IT!
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115 of 127 people found the following review helpful By cd on 17 July 2008
Format: Paperback
This book was recommended to me; indeed it seems to be well reviewed from a number of sources. However, if you are anything like me (background in British academia but wondering about the prospects of a non-academic future) you may well find yourself infuriated by the poor (and poorly excused) grammar and punctuation, and the fairly shallow content which is needlessly stretched out over 400 pages. I read on in hope of some pearls of wisdom and admit that there are *some* useful comments here but not enough to warrant paying for this book. Typically, advice will involve (say) typing `how to write a CV' (or, rather `Resume' - see below) into Google to give you an idea how to write a CV (p63).

While there is some helpful and reassuring advice on interviews and interview technique, I wish it had been made clear to me before I read this book (A New York Times Best Seller) that it will be of most comfort to a reader who is (a) American, and (b) religious. The chapter on working out your dream job, for example, emphasises that the decision is about you:

"Your agenda. Your wishes. Your dreams. Your mission in life, given you by the Great God, our Creator." (p240)

For at least some of you, this characteristic snippet might help inform your decision as to the kind of book you were about to `add to basket'.
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