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What Do You Care What Other People Think?: Further Adventures of a Curious Character Library Binding – 8 Oct 2008


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Product details

  • Library Binding: 255 pages
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1439559287
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439559284
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.7 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,082,252 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Feynman's voice echoes raw and direct through these pages.--James Gleick --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

'There were, it was said, only two ways of solving difficult problems in physics. One was to use mathematics; the other was to ask Feynman'
JOHN NAUGHTON, 'Observer'

Richard P. Feynman, who died in 1988, was indeed a curious character – irreverently funny, sometimes humble, sometimes shamelessly immodest, often profound, but always brilliantly and brimming with an infectios enthusiasm for finding things out.

'What Do You care What Other People Think'
is an engaging collection of stories, memories and letters from the Nobel Prize-winning physicist, accomplished bongo-player and artist, and includes 'Mr Feynman goes to Washington', an account of the vital role he played in the investigation into the 1986 Challenger Space Shuttle disaster.

'For Feynman, life in general and physics in particular were a hugely exciting game, played with boundless energy and panache'
PAUL DAVIES, 'Guardian'

'There were, it was said, only two ways of solving difficult problems in physics. One was to use mathematics; the other was to ask Feynman'
JOHN NAUGHTON, 'Observer'

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Jun 2000
Format: Paperback
The anecdotes from Feynman are, as usual, witty and amusing. However, the second half of the book is taken with his involvement in the Challenger enquiry, and it is gripping stuff.
I highly recommend it, to scientists and laymen alike.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By David Abbott on 8 Aug 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is billed as a second, and final, collection of reminiscences from one of the twentieth century's greatest thinkers, the physicist / artist / philosopher / educator / genius, Richard Feynman. This is true; however, it is somewhat different in style to the unsurpassably brilliant "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman?" - surely one of the greatest books ever written - to which this is the sequel.
The first part of the book covers, not in chronological order, some important events from Feynman's life, particularly his early life, that were omitted from "Surely You're Joking". Most especially, it covers his meeting, marriage and subsequent death of his first wife, a tale which is no less moving for being told in his typically matter-of-fact manner.
Fully half the book is taken up with his account of his time spent on the Challenger space shuttle disaster review board, which shows that he was determined to go about accident investigation with exactly the same rigour and method that he applied to all of his pursuits.
If "Surely You're Joking" were a film, "What Do You Care" would be the bonus DVD of extras that came with it. To a certain extent, it's more of what we loved about "Surely You're Joking"; occasionally it throws the main narrative into a different light; sometimes it feels a trifle redundant. For example, why include Feynman's report on the Challenger disaster as an appendix to his own excellent and detailed account of his time working on the same, when it includes no new information? If this were indeed a DVD, it would be criticised for unnecessary reuse of material.
One welcome inclusion is a small collection of illustrations, some showing Feynman at various stages of his career but also some of his own drawings.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Jun 2000
Format: Paperback
The story of investigation of Challenger gives a good understanding of how does Washington work. All other events mentioned in the book look like piecies which did not fit into the first book "Surelly you are joking Mr Fenman", so the book lacks a "master story". However it does not matter. It is great anyway. WORTH READING.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Kerr TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Sep 2003
Format: Paperback
If you've read 'Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman!', you will love this book too. If you haven't, you could do worse than read this one first!
Richard Feynman was a fantastic scientist. So are lots of people on this world. What set Feynman apart was his lust for life, his childlike, unending enthusiasm for finding things out, and his infectious humour.
As well as getting a taste of Feynman's enthusiasm, you'll also get a real insight into the way NASA worked (works...?), because the second half of this book concentrates on Feynman's involvement in the investigation into the Challenger shuttle disaster. You'll also understand why his wife told him he'd have to get involved in the investigation, because if he didn't, nobody would ever find out what went wrong.
He was a unique and brilliant man, and if you read this, maybe - just maybe - some of that brilliance and enthusiasm will rub off on you too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven Unwin on 14 Feb 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read Genius: Richard Feynman and Modern Physics I'd discovered the fascinating work and life of Richard Feynman and was keen to learn more. This is the second of two books Feynman wrote. I happened to come across this book first and perhaps I've read them in the wrong order, no matter.

The book is autobiographical, but in a typical spirit of nonconformity is not a biography. Rather it is a collection of anecdotes written about episodes in Feynman's life. The first half of the book is a selection of these short stories, in no particular order, each describing in a matter of fact fashion an aspect of Feynman's life. Each as a side effect provides an insight to his thinking and attitude to life and learning. Clearly this material was a key resource for James Gleick's work and I had the feeling that these were stories which didn't find their way into Feynman's previous book `Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman'. As a consequence Gleick's book provides a more rounded and complete picture which ties these snippets together. However Feynman's book has more to offer.

The second half of the book has a detailed account of the work on investigating the cause of the Challenger Shuttle disaster. This description will be of interest to anyone who wants to find out the technical details of just what went wrong, but more interestingly has some fascinating insights into the afflictions that can infect the thinking of large organisations.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By John E. Davidson on 18 Jan 2005
Format: Paperback
The sequel to Surely You're Joking, Mr.Feynman!: Adventures of a Curious Character - this is a book of two parts.
The first part is essentially a continuation of the previous volume - more very entertaining anecdotes.
The second, and in many ways more interesting part, is about Feynman's role in the investigation of the Space Shuttle disaster.
This is a fascinating story - his meetings with NASA engineers and managers tell an interesting story about how management sends you mad and/or makes you stupid. For example, every manager he asked, even though they were all trained as engineers, said there was a zero chance of the shuttle failing catastrophically. Not a position Feynman had a lot of patience with.
Highly recommended
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