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West Kennet Long Barrow: Landscape, Shamans and the Cosmos Paperback – 1 Mar 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 233 pages
  • Publisher: Stone Seeker Publishing (1 Mar. 2011)
  • ISBN-10: 0956034217
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956034212
  • Product Dimensions: 24.4 x 16.8 x 1.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 824,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By trendy on 18 April 2012
Format: Paperback
Bought this book on a recent trip to Avebury. The author calls it a labour of love and my word it shows that on every page. Anybody on their first trip to the region should have this as their bible. Not only is WKLB unpicked to the degree that you can familiarise yourself with every stone, skeleton and fragment of pottery, but there are fascinating descriptions of how the barrow inter-relates with all the other legendary sites in this sacred landscape. The chapters are not too long, are nicely spaced out with pictures, maps and diagrams, and even personal touches (the author even mentions his daughter from time to time and her love of a 'fairy tree' near the slope up to the barrow), giving this the hallmarks of a classic. Immaculately researched by a pagan author who has respect for all other religions and comes across as a really decent human being, it is admirable how he has made an academic subject so easily accessible to the masses. As an amateur astronomer myself, I found the latter chapters on stars fascinating, and for those interested in the paranormal - there is much to be intrigued about.

All in all then - brilliant. I am going back down there in August and buying another copy. One for my rucksack and one for 'best' - it's that good. You could visit WKLB every day in a week's trip with this book and still have something to discover. When you read this, you feel as if you are actually WITH the author - and that is what sets it apart. Even the text font is easy on the eye. Many authors of promising but ultimately dry historical texts could do to buy this and learn from it. It's like reading an advanced school project in a way - only this one would be first class at every level.

Wonderful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Burley on 2 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
No other book provides as much detailed analysis of the breadth of architectural, archaeological, environmental and spiritual aspects of West Kennet Long Borrow and surrounding environs. If you have yet to see WKLB for yourself, or enjoyed visiting this ancient sacred site many a time, you'll discover Peter Knight's book providing valuable information about this barrow and the sacred landscape within which it is situated, that you cannot find elsewhere. I highly recommend the book.

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Red Fox on 19 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback
I really wanted to like this book as West Kennet Long Barrow is a wonderful place that i visit often and have done for many years. Peter Knight is obviously a great enthusiast and like me has a love of the Land in the area. The book though comes over as a mish mash of other peoples ideas (which he does acknowledge) and his gushing comments such as "Nice one Paul!" in response to a Paul Devereux quote and "Touche Terence" when referring to a Terence Meaden quote. Its all very irritating and reads like a long schoolboy essay. I dont doubt for one minute that people experience many different effects in the Barrow (a friend of mine was one such person)but the way they are presented in the book without discretion makes you wonder what exactly the point is of detailing them all. When he gets on to discussions of channelling and crop circles i was all but ready to stop reading.

I dont know what i was expecting from the book if im honest. I do not like reading "dry" academic tomes with no soul but neither do i like reading new age, gushing indiscrimant texts such as this. I still feel the best way to approach sacred areas such as WKLB is with a clear, discriminatory mind and an open heart and let whatever the Land has to offer speak to you.

I feel the book is a missed opportunity in some respects but i cannot fault the authors enthusiasm.

One final point; crop formations appear near to prehistoric sites because the folk who make the formations put them there and they do in fact enhance the beauty and sacredness of the Land but just like The Barrow itself, they are human creations.
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