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Well of Darkness: The Sovereign Stone Trilogy Paperback – 17 Apr 2001


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Frequently Bought Together

Well of Darkness: The Sovereign Stone Trilogy + Guardians of the Lost: The Sovereign Stone Trilogy + Journey Into the Void: The Sovereign Stone Trilogy
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Product details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Voyager; New Ed edition (17 April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006486142
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006486145
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 4.1 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 926,389 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Weis and Hickman's new fantasy novel, The Well of Darkness, the first in the Sovereign Stone sequence, is far darker than we are used to from these authors. Hidden among the four elements and their magic is the Void and the dark, death-orientated magic that is its own; among the court of wise King Tamaros and his pious son Helmos there sits ambitious younger son Dagnarus and his hopelessly loyal former whipping boy Gareth. As a boy of 10, Dagnarus sets his future by asking Gareth to study Void magic for him; he intends to be king, and nothing will be allowed to stand in his way--not father, not brother, not the magic-soaked paladins who control the Portals that connect the human realms with those of the proud violent elves, the sullen horse-riding dwarves and the omen-fearing sardonic orks of the sea... This is an enjoyably bleak read--Gareth, driven to the worst of evils by his admiration for his prince yet retaining sparks of conscience, and some of our sympathy, even at his most atrocious, is a memorable creation, and Helmos, a man so dominated by conscience and self-regarding honour as to be weak, is hardly less so. --Roz Kaveney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

'When you gaze into the abyss…'

Dagnarus' hatred of his elder brother, Crown prince Helmos, is equal only to his hunger to become one of the Dominion Lords, guardians of the magical tunnels that connect the various races of Vinnengael. Yet his plans to gain power in the kingdom are only set in motion with the arrival of the shy scholarly Gareth, who is recruited to be Dagnarus' whipping boy. Despite all their differences an unshakeable bond is formed and Gareth, with his prince's support, begins to master the forbidden Void magic. Unleashing forces that even the most powerful of magi fear, the two friends set in motion a chain of events that threaten to destroy the entire kingdom.

A gripping story of magic corrupted, 'Well of Darkness' takes the unique approach of focusing on the evil protagonists in the story, as we follow them from boys to men, and is set to elevate the careers of bestselling 'Dragonlance' authors Weis & Hickman to spectacular new heights.


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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DHONDT Ann (my wife) on 4 Sept. 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you - as I - have been a fan of Weiss & Hickman for years, and swore that you'd like every book they'd written ..... well, maybe you shouldn't read any further. This first part of a new trilogy in a new universe has in some reviews been heralded as Weiss & Hickman's best so far ... but every man's entitled to his opinion, and mine differs. Whereas the Dragonlance books and the Deathgate novels I've read offered great characters with real debt, and powerfull stories the reader enters somewhere in the middle between mysterious pasts and uncertain futures ... Well of Darkness only offers one-dimensional characters, vague magic, unnamed gods, and an entirely predictable outcome. Don't get me wrong: in itself the book is a good read ... but we've all come to expect so much more from Weiss & Hickman. Maybe it's because we've been spoiled and our expectations are just too high - especially so soon after Dragons of a Fallen Sun. I'll buy their next work in the War of Souls trilogy, but the second part of the Sovereign Stone ? (even the artifact of the universe's name promisses more than it delivers). In the end, I guess everyone is entitled to a booboo, even the best writers, and I still believe Weiss & Hickman belong in that category.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Cronin VINE VOICE on 1 Sept. 2003
Format: Paperback
In my view, this is a rare novel, an intriguing piece of fantast literature. Our main characters are Gareth, a birthmarked boy who is to become whipping boy to the other main character Prince Dagnarus. Dagnarus is second in line to the throne of Vinnengael, after his father and elder brother, but he harbours ambitions of becoming king. He desires to become a Dominion Lord and seeks out, with the help of Gareth, the dark magic of the Void, where nothing exists and which will not aid unless sacrifice is paid. They learn how to create and control the undead Vrykyl, the dark counterparts to the good and just Dominion Lords. At the transmutation ceremony of the Dominion Lords, Dagnarus's dark secret is revealed and the kingdom is torn apart.
For once, the main characters in this book are on the dark side, yet having grown up with them, we feel some sympathy, especially for Gareth, utterly devoted to his prince.
This is a fantasy book which is well worth a read, and I'm looking forward to the next episode in the trilogy.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's been probably 10 years since I read this trilogy the first time; and high time I revisited it. This book, the first of the trilogy, is another brilliant foray into fantasty by Weis and Hickman, the authors of the Dragonlance series and many more books.

In this book, the reader is introduced to Dagnarus, second son of the King of Vinnengael. The King is a good, honest and godly man, who strives to love his second son, but finds it not in his heart to feel about him as he does about his first son and heir, Helmos. Dagnarus has for company a whipping boy, Gareth, who he binds to him body and soul. The reader follows Dagnarus and Gareth through their boyhood as they begin to grow into the men they are likely to become. Surrounding them is intrigue and danger; the elves, divided between loyalty to their Sheild and their Divine, the orken, who follow signs and omens, and the dwarves, who have only vague contempt for the humans; all these, and the humans themselves, are split into factions, each hunting for their own advantage.

Dagnarus, however, is the danger they all must face eventually. For he is determined, by any means necessary, to become King of Vinnengael; and anyone who stands in his way will be removed. Gareth finds himself drawn into forces that he cannot counter, drawn despite himself into Dagnarus' plans. And if Dagnarus is not loyal to his own kin and kingdom; if Vinnengael should fall; if the dark magic of the Void should become supreme - what fate must lie the land?

I'm really glad I still enjoyed this, years after my first reading; I'm looking forward to getting onto the remaining two books of the trilogy. Highly recommended.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 April 2001
Format: Paperback
I won't give too much away, suffice to say Weis and Hickman are on peak form in this first installment of their new trilogy. The characters, politics annd action are so good and the storyline is carefully and intricately peeled away. When a murder occurs witnessed by the two of the characters, other authors might of been happy ot drg it out for chapters and chapters, not these two. They get it over and done with on the next page and move onto more interesting and exciting plot developments. Things just get better and better the whole way through and there's two books to go. I can't wait!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Feb. 2001
Format: Paperback
I've been a fan of Weis and Hickman since my early teens, over a decade ago. I must admit that I stopped reading them after the ending of the Death Gate cycle fizzled out due to being stretched over seven books. (Robert Jordan syndrome, methinks...). I tried to read Dragons of Summer Flame but it felt like a cynical retread of a much loved trilogy. Therefore it was with some trepidation that I bought Well of Darkness. All I can say is that this is their most mature work to date. This is a lot darker than their earlier works and succeeds where so many fantasy novels fail: by delivering well motivated and fleshed out evil protagonists. Dagnarus and Gareth's relationship is a kind of perverse opposite to Raistlain and Caramon of Dragonlance fame. There is no overriding morality that good will automatically win and in this sense the reader is constantly suprised as his/her expectations are overturned time and again. Vinnegael castle is an amazing backdrop to this story and the way in which it is described puts me in mind of Gormenghast - overpowering yet easily brought down, echoing halls teaming with intrigue. I don't want to discuss the story in case I ruin it for any new readers, but suffice to say that I really want to see what direction they take it in the second volume. OK, it's not as mythic as Dragonlance, as inventive as Darksword or as GOOD as The Rose of the Prophet Trilogy, (Nothing tops that in my opinion): but it has the most realistic characters and a darker 'noughties' edge that make it different to anything they've written before.
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