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Weird Cases: Comic and Bizarre Cases from Courtrooms around the World Hardcover – 9 Dec 2009


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 159 pages
  • Publisher: Wildy, Simmonds and Hill; 1t edition (9 Dec 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0854900616
  • ISBN-13: 978-0854900619
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 0.7 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 74,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"This little gem of a book contains chapters on everything...scintillating with wry humour and personal aside and anecdote from the learned author...this is one jolly book" --Philip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

About the Author

Gary Slapper is an established writer in bringing law to a wide audience. He is a columnist with The Times, for which he has written since 1992, and Professor of Law at The Open University. He also acts as a legal consultant to BBC drama and documentaries.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. C. J. Murphy on 4 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase
This is a fun easy reading book, good for anyone who is not looking for a deep meaningful look at the legals system, bought it as a present and it was a success.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Phillip Taylor TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Nov 2010
OF THE BIZARRE IN COURT!

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

Weird's not the word for some of the wild, wonderful, rude, crude and yes, bizarre things that happen, or are apt to happen in courtrooms worldwide, if Gary Slapper's entertaining new book is anything to go by.

As Slapper, leading legal academic and Times columnist notes: "courts must often come to rational conclusions about events that would in fact be rejected by television drama producers as implausibly bizarre."

Most of the cases he cites -- indeed probably all of them -- should be classified under the `you-couldn't-make-it-up' category. Take the case of the injurious underpants, for example. Well, you could call it that, especially when it's brought to your attention that in 2002, there were 369 people seriously injured by their underpants or knickers.

Attitudes to other instances of sartorial crime seem to vary around the world and indeed in the same country, notably the United States, a rich source of `weird cases' as avid Judge Judy fans will confirm. Do not, for example, wear revealingly 'saggy' trousers in Delcambre, Louisiana, or you might end up with a $500 fine and a 6 month jail sentence.

In Flint, Michigan, though, where things are a bit more lenient, you might get off with one of the `droopy-drawers' tickets that have been issued to local people since early 2009. However, not to worry if you are holidaying in the aptly named Riviera Beach, Florida where a defendant named Mr Hart escaped conviction for a similar offence, when the judge ruled that the local law prohibiting low slung trousers was unconstitutional.

And on it goes.
Read more ›
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Scruff on 8 Aug 2012
Phillip Taylor and Elizabeth Taylor:

"...Scintillating with wry humour and enlivened by personal aside and anecdote from the learned author, `Weird Cases' is more or less a compendium of the sort of `funny old world' stories that you might read in `Private Eye'.."

Errrrrm obviously someone hasn't read Private Eye or if they do doesn't understand it.

I guess that is why they are on line giving reviews to drum up business?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
More than a touch... 26 Nov 2010
By Phillip Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
OF THE BIZARRE IN COURT

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

Weird's not the word for some of the wild, wonderful, rude, crude and yes, bizarre things that happen, or are apt to happen in courtrooms worldwide, if Gary Slapper's entertaining new book is anything to go by.

As Slapper, leading legal academic and Times columnist notes: "courts must often come to rational conclusions about events that would in fact be rejected by television drama producers as implausibly bizarre."

Most of the cases he cites -- indeed probably all of them -- should be classified under the `you-couldn't-make-it-up' category. Take the case of the injurious underpants, for example. Well, you could call it that, especially when it's brought to your attention that in 2002, there were 369 people seriously injured by their underpants or knickers.

Attitudes to other instances of sartorial crime seem to vary around the world and indeed in the same country, notably the United States, a rich source of `weird cases' as avid Judge Judy fans will confirm. Do not, for example, wear revealingly 'saggy' trousers in Delcambre, Louisiana, or you might end up with a $500 fine and a 6 month jail sentence.

In Flint, Michigan, though, where things are a bit more lenient, you might get off with one of the `droopy-drawers' tickets that have been issued to local people since early 2009. However, not to worry if you are holidaying in the aptly named Riviera Beach, Florida where a defendant named Mr Hart escaped conviction for a similar offence, when the judge ruled that the local law prohibiting low slung trousers was unconstitutional.

And on it goes. This little gem of a book contains chapters on everything from compensation and punishment, to love and sex -- and from judges, jurors and lawyers to pets and animals, violence and death. Food, drink and drugs, and of course, fashion, do not escape scrutiny either

Scintillating with wry humour and enlivened by personal aside and anecdote from the learned author, `Weird Cases' is more or less a compendium of the sort of `funny old world' stories that you might read in `Private Eye', except that each has been revealed in the light of day within the august precincts of a courtroom. In particular, the revelations about vexatious or loopy litigants are hilarious. What a rich trove of anecdotes for your next after-dinner speech with the legal eagles!

If you're a member of the legal fraternity, (or even if you're not) this is one jolly book and one of no small practical value too. It will certainly reassure you that even in the law - particularly in the law - `there's nowt as queer as folk'. And as Christmas will soon be upon us, this book is a gift for your more solemn legal friends with more than a touch of the bizarre in court.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Excellent! 10 Sep 2010
By J. Kearney - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is a must read for any law students... it keeps the humour going long after you have burned the midnight oil from studying.
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