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The Weight Of The Evidence (Inspector Appleby Mystery) [Paperback]

Michael Innes
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
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Book Description

23 Sep 2008 Inspector Appleby Mystery (Book 9)
Meteorites fall from the sky but seldom onto the heads of science dons in redbrick universities; yet this is what happens to Professor Pluckrose of Nestfield University. Inspector Appleby soon discovers that the meteorite was not fresh and that the professor's deckchair had been placed underneath a large, accessible tower - he already knew something of academic jealousies but he was to find out a great deal more.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 238 pages
  • Publisher: House of Stratus; New edition edition (23 Sep 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842327585
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842327586
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 649,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Born in Edinburgh in 1906, the son of the city's Director of Education, John Innes Mackintosh Stewart wrote a highly successful series of mystery stories under the pseudonym Michael Innes. Innes was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, where he was presented with the Matthew Arnold Memorial Prize and named a Bishop Frazer's scholar. After graduation he went to Vienna, to study Freudian psychoanalysis for a year and following his first book, an edition of Florio's translation of Montaigne, was offered a lectureship at the University of Leeds. In 1932 he married Margaret Hardwick, a doctor, and they subsequently had five children including Angus, also a novelist. The year 1936 saw Innes as Professor of English at the University of Adelaide, during which tenure he wrote his first mystery story, 'Death at the President's Lodging'. With his second, 'Hamlet Revenge', Innes firmly established his reputation as a highly entertaining and cultivated writer. After the end of World War II, Innes returned to the UK and spent two years at Queen's University, Belfast where in 1949 he wrote the 'Journeying Boy', a novel notable for the richly comedic use of an Irish setting. He then settled down as a Reader in English Literature at Christ Church, Oxford, from which he retired in 1973. His most famous character is 'John Appleby', who inspired a penchant for donnish detective fiction that lasts to this day. Innes's other well-known character is 'Honeybath', the painter and rather reluctant detective, who first appeared in 1975 in 'The Mysterious Commission'. The last novel, 'Appleby and the Ospreys', was published in 1986, some eight years before his death in 1994. 'A master - he constructs a plot that twists and turns like an electric eel: it gives you shock upon shock and you cannot let go.' - Times Literary Supplement.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Donnish Detective Story 27 April 2001
Format:Paperback
Map of Nesfield Univeristy - Wool Court and surrounding buildings; with Tower over From beginning to end, this Appleby tale set in a university is a sheer delight to read, due to the excellent dialogue, the humour, the interesting and amusing characters, and the maze of bizarre and mystifying events, involving meteorites, love affairs, and false beards - reminding the reader of John Dickson Carr's Arabian Nights Murder (1936). The murder is unique in that the actual murder - that is, not the surrounding circumstances, but the grisly and gory deed itself - is funny. The ending, however, is an anti-climax.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the others 10 Jan 2010
Format:Paperback
I have now read a number of 'Inspector Appleby' mysteries and must confess myself a bit disappointed with this one. Most of these are very good but this one, after a promising start, sort of fizzled out half way through.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The twice-landed meteorite 13 Dec 2004
By E. A. Lovitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The setting of "The Weight of the Evidence" (1943) is undoubtedly a product of the many years that Michael Innes (whose real name was John Innes Mackintosh Stewart) spent laboring in the halls of academia. Among the seats of learning where he taught are Queen's University in Belfast, and the universities of Oxford, Adelaide, and Leeds.

The author could not help but involve a legion of eccentric, pompous, and even murderous professors in his narrative and their quarrels (the matter of the shared telephone), naps (a fatal pastime for Professor Pluckrose), and hobbies (Pluckrose appeared to have been smashed by his 'own' meteorite, which was a sort of poetic justice since he had originally stolen it from the Duke of Nesfield) are a good part of what makes this book sparkle. Since this mystery takes place in one of England's provincial universities, Innes also cocks an occasional snoot at its parvenu ways: "The staff--a word which at Oxford or Cambridge might be used of persons employed in a hotel--is not accommodated in spacious common rooms or cozy suites."

After Professor Pluckrose is found under his meteorite in his usual napping spot in the courtyard of Nesfield University, Inspector Appleby and his provincial comrade-in-arms, Hobhouse set out to examine the clues of the numerous false beards, the green bust, the false passports and the polygamous student, the darkroom maze, the meteorite, and of course, the murder. And by the way, who turned on the courtyard fountain just as the Dean was passing by?

All of these elements must come together before book's end when Appleby reveals the solution to this complicated puzzle.

If you haven't already discovered Michael Innes, "The Weight of the Evidence" is a good place to start among his donnish Appleby mysteries, although my personal favorite is "Death at the President's Lodging" (1936) if only because its setting bears a close resemblance to Oxford University.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Professor Pluckrose Pounded to Pot-pourri" 10 Aug 2011
By E. A. Lovitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
The setting of "The Weight of the Evidence" (1943) is undoubtedly a product of the many years that Michael Innes (whose real name was John Innes Mackintosh Stewart) spent laboring in the halls of academia. Among the seats of learning where he taught are Queen's University in Belfast, and the universities of Oxford, Adelaide, and Leeds.

The author could not help but involve a legion of eccentric, pompous, and even murderous professors in his narrative and their quarrels (the matter of the shared telephone), naps (a fatal pastime for Professor Pluckrose), and hobbies (Pluckrose appeared to have been smashed by his 'own' meteorite, which was a sort of poetic justice since he had originally stolen it from the Duke of Nesfield) are a good part of what makes this book sparkle. Since this mystery takes place in one of England's provincial universities, Innes also cocks an occasional snoot at its parvenu ways: "The staff--a word which at Oxford or Cambridge might be used of persons employed in a hotel--is not accommodated in spacious common rooms or cozy suites."

After Professor Pluckrose is found under his meteorite in his usual napping spot in the courtyard of Nesfield University, Inspector Appleby and his provincial comrade-in-arms, Hobhouse set out to examine the clues of the numerous false beards, the green bust, the false passports and the polygamous student, the darkroom maze, the meteorite, and of course, the murder. And by the way, who turned on the courtyard fountain just as the Dean was passing by?

All of these elements must come together before book's end when Appleby reveals the solution to this complicated puzzle.

If you haven't already discovered Michael Innes, "The Weight of the Evidence" is a good place to start among his donnish Appleby mysteries, although my personal favorite is "Death at the President's Lodging" (1936) if only because its setting bears a close resemblance to Oxford University.
5.0 out of 5 stars Weighty evidence indeed... 14 Aug 2010
By K. M. Norwood - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
When a professor is struck by a large meteor in the courtyard of a British university, it takes no time at all for Inspector John Appleby to realize that it's murder. Innes's plot is complex and entertaining, but what makes this book special is its hilarious gallery of snotty English academicians. Lovers of the English mystery in its "light-hearted satire of the upper crust" mode should adore this novel, which tops even Innes's first two (and best known) books, "Death at the President's Lodgings" and "Hamlet, Revenge!"
5.0 out of 5 stars Death and the Don 15 July 2006
By E. A. Lovitt - Published on Amazon.com
The setting of "The Weight of the Evidence" (1943) is undoubtedly a product of the many years that Michael Innes (whose real name was John Innes Mackintosh Stewart) spent laboring in the halls of academia. Among the seats of learning where he taught are Queen's University in Belfast, and the universities of Oxford, Adelaide, and Leeds.

The author could not help but involve a legion of eccentric, pompous, and even murderous professors in his narrative and their quarrels (the matter of the shared telephone), naps (a fatal pastime for Professor Pluckrose), and hobbies (Pluckrose appeared to have been smashed by his 'own' meteorite, which was a sort of poetic justice since he had originally stolen it from the Duke of Nesfield) are a good part of what makes this book sparkle. Since this mystery takes place in one of England's provincial universities, Innes also cocks an occasional snoot at its parvenu ways: "The staff--a word which at Oxford or Cambridge might be used of persons employed in a hotel--is not accommodated in spacious common rooms or cozy suites."

After Professor Pluckrose is found under his meteorite in his usual napping spot in the courtyard of Nesfield University, Inspector Appleby and his provincial comrade-in-arms, Hobhouse set out to examine the clues of the numerous false beards, the green bust, the false passports and the polygamous student, the darkroom maze, the meteorite, and of course, the murder. And by the way, who turned on the courtyard fountain just as the Dean was passing by?

All of these elements must come together before book's end when Appleby reveals the solution to this complicated puzzle.

If you haven't already discovered Michael Innes, "The Weight of the Evidence" is a good place to start among his donnish Appleby mysteries, although my personal favorite is "Death at the President's Lodging" (1936) if only because its setting bears a close resemblance to Oxford University.
5.0 out of 5 stars Monster meteor mashes man. Could it be murder? 16 Sep 2004
By E. A. Lovitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The setting of "The Weight of the Evidence" (1943) is undoubtedly a product of the many years that Michael Innes (whose real name was John Innes Mackintosh Stewart) spent laboring in the halls of academia. Among the seats of learning where he taught are Queen's University in Belfast, and the universities of Oxford, Adelaide, and Leeds.

The author could not help but involve a legion of eccentric, pompous, and even murderous professors in his narrative and their quarrels (the matter of the shared telephone), naps (a fatal pastime for Professor Pluckrose), and hobbies (Pluckrose appeared to have been smashed by his 'own' meteorite, which was a sort of poetic justice since he had originally stolen it from the Duke of Nesfield) are a good part of what makes this book sparkle. Since this mystery takes place in one of England's provincial universities, Innes also cocks an occasional snoot at its parvenu ways: "The staff--a word which at Oxford or Cambridge might be used of persons employed in a hotel--is not accommodated in spacious common rooms or cozy suites."

After Professor Pluckrose is found under his meteorite in his usual napping spot in the courtyard of Nesfield University, Inspector Appleby and his provincial comrade-in-arms, Hobhouse set out to examine the clues of the numerous false beards, the green bust, the false passports and the polygamous student, the darkroom maze, the meteorite, and of course, the murder. And by the way, who turned on the courtyard fountain just as the Dean was passing by?

All of these elements must come together before book's end when Appleby reveals the solution to this complicated puzzle.

If you haven't already discovered Michael Innes, "The Weight of the Evidence" is a good place to start among his donnish Appleby mysteries, although my personal favorite is "Death at the President's Lodging" (1936) if only because its setting bears a close resemblance to Oxford University.
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