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In the Wee Small Hours
 
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In the Wee Small Hours

3 Jan 2013 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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3:42
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2:52
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3:33


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 3 Jan 2013
  • Label: Bringins Music
  • Copyright: (c) 2013 Bringins Music
  • Total Length: 50:03
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00B06JPRW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 182,422 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By mitchgibbo on 6 Jun 2005
Format: Audio CD
During the 50's Sinatra made three seminal albums, Songs for Swinging Lovers, Come Fly With Me, and this...In the Wee Small Hours. This is just THE perfect album for those late nights when you have nothing else to do but relax with a good bottle of what ever you fancy (Frank would approve of a Bourbon or two) and losing yourself in this simply superb set.
Sinatra sings for the lost and the lonely, and no-one and I mean NO-ONE does it any better than this. Every note is sung from the heart and every note connects. The Chairman of The Board was truly at the top of his game when he made this and it shows.
Accompanied by the brilliant Nelson Riddle and his Orchestra this is big band swing does the blues and it works supremely well.
Quite simply put...brilliant!
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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 29 Aug 2003
Format: Audio CD
"In the Wee Small Hours" was the very first 12" album Frank Sinatra recorded, a superb collection of ballads arranged by Nelson Riddle that went to the top of the charts in 1955. Riddle created a melancholy sound that perfectly suited these songs of loneliness and despair, and which showcased Sinatra's sudden maturity as a vocalist. Everybody who could read a newspaper or listen to a gossip on the phone knew that Sinatra's love affair with actress Ava Gardner had ended badly, and it was impossible not to have that tabloid fact provide his singing with an obvious poignancy with this selection of songs. However, what was important was that Sinatra had raised his singing to a whole new level, showing a mastery of phrasing that would define the rest of his career. Special mention needs to be made of the piano work by Bill Miller, which also stands out in Riddle's sparse arrangements.
In addition to the title song by Bob Hilliard & David Mann, there are a series of standards of this type such as Duke Ellington's "Mood Indigo," Cole Porter's "What is this Thing Called Love?," Arlen & Harbaurg's "Last Night When We Were Young," and a trio of Rodgers & Hart tunes. My vote for the best track would go to Hoagy Carmichael's "I Get Along Without You Very Well," a song that epitomizes the mood of the entire album and highlights Sinatra's singing prowess. With the "In the Wee Small Hours" album the crooner who had been the heartthrob of the nation's Bobbysoxers gave way to the saloon singer who became one of the most important musical figure of the 20th century (Bing Crosby, Elvis, and the Beatles are the others who define that ultimate level). This is a must have album for Sinatra fans, the oldest record on my list of ten essential Sinatra albums.
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61 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Mystery Reviewer on 23 May 2001
Format: Audio CD
First off let me say I am 23 years old and my music collection includes Oasis, Pearl Jam, Fat Boy Slim, Pink Floyd, U2 etc. I think the main reason that young people today think that Sinatra is very sad is because the only experience they have of him is him wailing through 'My Way' about 20 years after his voice had long left him. Please understand: Sinatra in the 80s and 90s is appaling - he lost it completely. However in the 50s Sinatra was absolutley amazing! He had the greatest songwriters EVER working with him and his Nelson Riddle arranged albums are outstanding. This is a sombre album with lyrics which are just as relevant today and still feel contemparary. A case in point is "Can't We Be Friends", a song based on what women say after they've ripped out your heart. It actually makes you feel BETTER during bad times, not worse. If you want the more upbeat lively side of Sinatra you can't beat SONGS FOR SWINGIN' LOVERS. Remember: When buying Sinatra, get 50s albums and avoid new 'compilation' albums like the plague!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By ArcherFish123 on 8 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is an album of the finest calibre, bar none. For those of you who like the capitivating pensive moods found on albums such as Jeff Buckley's "Grace" or Nick Drake's "Bryter Later", this album is a must for your collection.
Without repeating the well known retoric about Frank's split from Ava - the genious of this record is the fact it is an album overflowing with painfully tender tracks, where one of the greatest voices of all time has worn his heart completely on his sleeve for 50 glorious minutes.
If that is not enough to draw you attention then you probably wouldn't like it anyway!!
My personal favourite tracks here are the title track "Wee Small Hours", the lonely "I see your face before me" and the wonderfully fine "I get along without you very well".
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By E. Jackson on 24 April 2002
Format: Audio CD
Do not be put off by the cover artwork not being up to modern standards nor by any preconceived notions that you may have about what Frank Sinatra represents in terms of "showbusiness". This work breaks all the moulds and shows why you should listen without prejudice.
I am a John Martyn fan and primarily like guitar music in all forms from metal to classical. I heard "I get along without you very well" on the radio. This started a whole new interest area in which to buy and listen stunned as I was by the depth of feeling evident on this album. If you are in to sincerity and emotion in music this is a big one.
I'm now investigating the Capitol records output in its entirety. Not since I saw BB King live have I been so impressed by a talent or by an artist's sheer class.
This album is a major achievement in recording a very genuine blues and parts are as difficult to listen to as Gorecki's Third for someone looking for wallpaper. This is not easy listening but is a genuine classic for those who appreciate classic singing, sensitive orchestration and depth of feeling. I never thought that I'd see the day, but the title track alone says more than a dozen empty guitar solos. Don't worry what others think, you can always conceal the CD.
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