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We Can Create


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Amazon's Maps Store

Music

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Photos

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Videos

Vicissitude
Visit Amazon's Maps Store
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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: EMI Music & Marketing
  • ASIN: 5557707050
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By russell clarke TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 2 Jan. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Maps : We Can Create was short listed for the 2007 Mercury music prize but didn't win it as some band from somewhere cooler than Northampton (Just about anywhere then) and with far more interesting haircuts won it instead . This is one of those albums I have been meaning to listen to but never found the time as I was too busy listening to other things that seemed far more diverting. I regret that now because having eventually got around to listening to We Can Create I really like it. It reminds me , and I realise I am not being especially cognisant in saying this, of many of the shoe gazing* bands of the early nineties. This is a good thing as I really quite enjoyed some of them and this album while harking back to that scene is not entirely derivative either. Bear with me while i do something academic*"Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s, lasting until the mid 1990s. The shoegazing sound featured extensive use of guitar effects, and indistinguishable vocal melodies that blended into the creative noise of the guitars."
(Adapted from Wikipedia)
So how does it differ from say My Bloody Valentine, to whom it has been most frequently compared? Well for a start Maps are like a shoe gaze version of The Streets, in this case James Chapman in his bedroom with lots of dreadfully complicated stuff. Using electronics rather than more traditional organic six stringed instrumentation Chapman manages to craft aurally compelling vistas that while using the quiet/loud template of his peers have a dynamic integrity of their own. Plus he can write good enough songs with which to drape his sounds capes over.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Post Paul on 21 Aug. 2007
Format: Audio CD
This album is gorgeous.
I bought it on impulse and have been listening to it nonstop.
I actually think it deserves 5 stars, but since I've only had it for 3 days it probably wouldn't be fair to give it 5.
I come from a Sigur Rós, Mogwai, Muse, Radiohead, Mew, 65daysofstatic... music background and I found this to be really refreshing and uplifting, but not in a cheesy way.
I especially love the song 'Liquid Sugar', but there is really not a single weak or even average track.
Can't wait for the next album.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. T. Ainslie on 12 Feb. 2009
Format: Audio CD
I think many people don't quite understand Maps. James Chapman allegedly spearheaded the Nu Gaze movement, but this suggests he's producing walls of sound, droning space rock and dark psychedelica. Surely 'To The Sky' is evidence enough that he's not staring at his shoes.

I'll not beat around the bush, I L-O-V-E this album, from start to finish. Not since the Stone Roses has anyone so perfectly and effortlessly melded brilliant melodies with dance beats. The difference is as Maps is only one person, the beats in question are electronica rather than house. Picks are Eloise, Liquid Sugar, Don't Fear, You Don't Know Her Name, but all the songs are of high quality.

Critics of the album say its all too samey - such people miss the point. Maps have produced 11 tracks that may 'sound' the same (though this is something I would dispute) but are all still brilliant. Some would argue this is the art of true music.

But frankly you can get too analytical, which I want to avoid. I deliberately avoided writing a review until a good time after its release and Mercury music buzz, to show it stands the test of time. This isn't just an album for music enthusiasts, its an album for anyone who wants to pick a track at random and feel abit better about life three minutes later. A fine fine debut.
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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 20 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
Sleep, shag, and make Mercury Prize-nominated albums, that's what. James Chapman aka Maps made the bulk of his aptly-titled debut LP We Can Create on an old 16-track recorder squeezed into his flat in Northampton, England. That's right, with noisy old instruments and ne'er a computer in sight. The neighbors must've kicked up murder.

What type of music had the Jones's banging on the wall? An updated version of "shoegaze", don't you know. That bookish older brother of a genre from the early 90s that championed droning guitars, whispery voices, trippy lyrics, and floppy fringes.

Shoegaze strove to create a specific feeling. Namely, that of being off your head on drugs. In a quiet, let's-not-attract-the-barman's-attention kind of way.

Chief purveyors of this performance-enhanced music in the 90s were My Bloody Valentine, Slowdive, Chapterhouse, and Chapman's closest descendent Spacemen 3. They followed in the footsteps of the world's first shoegazer, John Lennon. He tried his damndest to replicate an acid trip with Tomorrow Never Knows. The result was out of this world. And he had a floppy fringe.

Chapman (no relation to Mark) has given us Shoegaze 3.0. A refit that maintains the genre's mood of low-key psychedelia. He's kept the breathy vocals, angelic aahs, and kiss-the-sky mantras. But the droning guitars are gone. Replaced by a universe of atmospheric electronics, including buzzing synths, trip-hop drums, and the odd Namlook-esque space bleep. In other words, ShoeRave.

Album centrepoint To The Sky winds into being like a musical jewellery box.
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