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We Are the Damned United: The Real Story of Brian Clough at Leeds United
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
I write this review as a Derby County Fan.

I've had this book for a few months now, but in all that time i was a bit put off reading it. I'm a huge Brian Clough & Peter Taylor fan and have read nearly everything written about the pair. Including 'The Damned United'

Although i liked the story of TDU i was well aware that a lot of it had to be taken with a pinch of salt.

When the film of TDU came out i was absolutely disappointed by it. I had hoped it would turn around all the
negativity surrounding the book, but i found too many errors and inaccuracies in it to make it enjoyable.

What really annoyed me about the film, was the way it portrayed Don Revie and his Leeds United team as nothing but a dirty, cheating bunch of savages. People who know nothing about the style of Don Revie'management and how is team played and how successful they were will far too easily draw the conclusion that they were a vile bunch of untalented thugs.

And that is not fair.

Another reason i may have been put off reading this book was probably because in the back of my mind i thought it may have been a blatant rip off of TDU. Trying to cash in on all the publicity.

HOW WRONG CAN YOU BE ?!

This was a fantastic read that really tried to pick out the reasons why the Revie Leeds were so successful and why the Clough Leeds got it so wrong.

The player interviews really bring the story alive and also add to the truth, the truth as they saw it, inside the changing rooms, inside Elland Road.

I also thought this book might have been very one sided towards Leeds and would slate Clough at every turn. But it did not do that either. Yes it tells you about Clough's flaws and where he got it wrong, but it also tells you about his genius and how he got it so right.

Praise is even given to Peter Taylor and his significant role in the Clough - Taylor partnership. Had Taylor followed Clough to Leeds, the story could have been so different for all concerned.

A fantastic read.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on 23 August 2009
I have probably read a fair bit on Brian Clough's time at Leeds United in the past but this is a lot more illuminating than anything else I have read with interviews with the likes of Peter Lorimer, Duncan McKenzie and Eddie Gray as well as from those who knew Clough a lot longer than the 44 days he spent at Leeds. For example, having read and seen `The Damned United', what was said about Clough's training methods and (all too briefly) his relationship with Alan Clarke I found particularly interesting. The use of Don Revie's writings for football annuals and various other sources from books, newspapers, other journalists and ex pros are well chosen and insightful. Parallels with the modern game and the match reports of all the league games played under Clough from the Yorkshire Evening Post at the time (in which you get the feeling, with just more luck, the tide was about to turn for the better) are fascinating. My only gripe is extremely minor concerning the `where are they now?' section at the end which features 12 players, some of whom contributed quite significantly to the book, others who did not. Given this apparently arbitrary choice, therefore, it would have been interesting to have read about other contributors to the book, like Peter Hampton, for example. But this is only a very minor gripe - I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to anyone with an interest in Leeds United, Brian Clough or indeed, football itself.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 9 November 2009
The book is complementary to the fictitious "Damned United" and give the factual account of the events concerning the appointment of Brian Clough as manager of Leeds United.
The "Damned United" is the more entertaining read, however "We are the damned United" is much more accurate in its story of the
Clough saga.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 13 September 2009
Having read THE DAMNED UNITED by David Peace a couple of years ago, and not been wholly impressed by it, I thought I'd check this one out.

Those looking for any real surprises will be disappointed. Many people, including former players, are interviewed, and a broad concensus is fairly easily reached: that Clough, for all his success at small club Derby, couldn't just smash down a bigger club's doors and change things overnight. Why Clough thought he could win over a rightly suspicious team of established players by telling them to bin all their hard-won medals is beyond me.

There's only so much you can write about a 44-day tenure, even with the background, build-up and aftermath, and I tend to agree with a previous reviewer who felt there was too much irrelevant material thrown in.

One inclusion, so far unmentioned by other reviewers, is part of the interview given by Norman Hunter. I think he comes about as close as any of the great Leeds side to admitting that Revie did bend the rules a bit, that he did in fact offer bribes. "There's no smoke without fire," he states. This I found disturbing and disappointing: for as a long-term Leeds "sympathiser" (I really do feel they were robbed on numerous occasions), I have always thought that the "dirty Leeds" tag and bribery allegations were pure sour grapes from opponents who just couldn't handle Leeds in the late 60s/early 70s.

All in all it's not a bad book, but it's not what I would call essential reading. THE UNFORGIVEN covers the same period and much else besides, and is I think a better book overall for anyone wishing to know about Leeds United's greatest years and not just Clough's time in charge.
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on 29 December 2010
i have always believed Revies Leeds were the greatest team ive ever seen (even thoough i didnt support them ) and was fascinated how he ran the club. this book takes up the "story" where "the unforgiven" book finished off- (i have also reviewed that book)or at least for the next 44 days anyway

as others have said there isnt really enough new material for a book like this and there is too much filling out. very little new material in this and i was bored in quite a few places-( at no point did i feel like that reading the unforgiven!!)

IMO there is enough material with Leeds to produce a book from the nend of Revie to the onset of Relegation just 8 years later, as although the players who came in as the IMMEDIATE replacements of Bremner, Giles Charlton Clarke etc such as Joe Jordon Gordon Mcqueen Terry Yorath Brian Flynn Tony Currie werent quite in the same class, they were certainly good enough to have kept Leeds as a top 6 club.

the real decline seem to set in a couple of years before the side went down !!!

that should be the next book about thois once great club
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 24 August 2009
With out doubt the best book on the subject of Brian Cloughs short reign at Elland Road. Well researched with quotes from those who where directly involved during this period of Uniteds history. A must read for all Leeds fans and those with an interest in Brian Cloughs football career.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 October 2009
This book gives a fascinating account of Brian Clough's short reign as boss of Leeds United and, like Steve Pitts's 39 Days of Gazza, describes in vivid detail the incredible goings on of a football club. My advice is to buy both books and compare football at the different levels.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 10 September 2009
This book covers ground which has become very familiar since the publication of David Peace's The Damned Utd. I had hoped, though, that the advertised approach of basing the narrative on the thoughts of the Leeds players who were actually involved would provide an entertaining and illuminating read. It doesn't. Material from what seem to be new interviews with four or five players is included, but this adds little to a tale that's been told much better in the past. And there's little enough new material. Much of the text is taken direct from newspaper articles, and a lot of it is neither relevant nor particularly interesting - for example, I can see little point in reprinting a lenghty interview with Billy Bremner from over a decade ago, giving his views on the England/Scotland match from Euro 96. I'd say more than half the book is material of this sort, ranging from potted histories of Leeds and Nottingham Forest, the managerial career of Peter Reid (why?), to some autobiography from a local Leeds sports journalist. The 44 days themselves are dealt with in pretty cursory fashion. On the plus side, the contemporary Yorkshire Post match reports are interesting, as are some of the players' comments - still surprisingly bitter even 35 years later. But that doesn't justify the filler which makes up the remainder, I'm afraid. Peace's book is a superb original, but it has encouraged a lot of poor cash-in publications. I'd suggest you read The Unforgiven instead, which attempts some serious discussion of this memorable incident in its final chapter.
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on 27 December 2012
As someone who would have described himself as a Leeds fan in '72, I was looking forward to this book as a companion piece to 'THE DAMNED UNITED', a book that I have read, and re-read.
It was good to hear the opinions of some of the Leeds players (but you would have to be able to associate the player, say Peter Lorimer, with his Leeds career) but frankly, there just weren't enough interviews and comments; I've seen them interviewed for a TV documentary, but there isn't much here, mostly comment from a Yorkshire Post journalist or two.
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on 28 March 2011
I didn't know what to expect when I first purchased this book, but I must say that I really enjoyed it and to hear all the ex leeds players who were there under him for them 44 days what they had to say about what went down and what they really though of Brian Clough.
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