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Wayfaring Stranger (Holland Family Novel) Hardcover – 15 Jul 2014

4.4 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (15 July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1476710791
  • ISBN-13: 978-1476710792
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 3.6 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 609,532 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

James Lee Burke is the author of many previous novels, many featuring Detective Dave Robicheaux. He won the Edgar Award in 1998 for Cimarron Rose, while Black Cherry Blues won the Edgar in 1990 and Sunset Limited was awarded the CWA Gold Dagger in 1998. He lives with his wife, Pearl, in Missoula, Montana and New Iberia, Louisiana.

Product Description

Review

Burke is, for me, one of the great American novelists - in any genre. In more than 30 novels over four decades, he has demonstrated repeatedly that he is a supreme storyteller and among the finest writers of contemporary prose ... the story is a visceral excoriation of the darkest side of the American dream, and asks the complicated question: can a good man ever defeat evil with goodness alone? (Geoffrey Wansell DAILY MAIL) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

A brilliant standalone novel from the crime-writing genius, James Lee Burke. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
this is book Forest Gump ought to be, with the sugar removed and the edge of darkness added. JLB uses a similar device of threading protagonist Weldon Holland through history from his first appearance with Bonnie and Clyde, brushing shoulders with Bugsy Seigal, Jack Warner and Frank Carbo.
The first chapter is superb, the sense of place and time so strong and defined you can smell the dust and weariness.
The story is bleak, with occasional successes mentioned in passing and setbacks focused upon. However it is epic in scope, detailed and increasingly tense. Sections could usefully be edited but the prose is as good as he has ever written, searing and creating images that stay with you long after finishing the book. Sadly it does end in a rather hasty epilogue which leaves the story both unfinished and unreasonably tidy, if that is possible. After ratcheting up the tension it runs out of steam rather suddenly, which is a great shame in terms of the scale and heart JLB has put into this novel. The character of Weldon is dark and unyielding, with echoes of Dave Robicheaux in his unremitting sense of principle, alienating and frustrating almost everyone around him. However in the best tradition of an unreliable narrator there remains a lot hidden of Weldon, and in fact the partner Herschel and his wife Linda Gail come to dominate. And there is an element of unreliability about Weldon's interpretation of what underlies the events that happen, rarely seeing the contribution that he himself makes through stubbornness and downright antagonism rather than a vast conspiracy proposed by antagonist Roy Wiseheart. In contrast to the fully realised and complex Linda Gail, Weldon's wife Rosita is strangely bland - her heroic suffering does not leave room for the shades of grey needed to explain her.
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Format: Paperback
James Lee Burke says this is his best book. I don’t agree. This ones got all his usual themes – the little guy against the corrupt global corporations – The broken world we live in and the yearning for the innocence of earlier times – Southern manners and inherent hypocrisy . This time it’s on a more personal level but it’s fundamentally flawed and lacking the impact of most of his other books. Sadly, despite his beautiful prose and stunning command of language I found this ultimately disappointing and I consider it one of his worst.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
just another brilliant jlb book with usual amazon efficiency.steve.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Different indeed. I love JLB I cannot wait to get my hands on his latest works, this was no different I bought it in Hardback. I found it quite difficult to find empathy with the main character (I liked the Grandfather's charcater much more & he was a hard old man). I also found the 'love scenes' cloying and over the top. I wonder if it was because it was set in entirely different times? There are parts of the book very beautiful & touching but it was not my favourite. But hey, who am I to criticize the Master.....
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