Watch now


12.45 + 1.26 UK delivery
In stock. Sold by watsonsinc

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

A Waste of Shame: The Mystery of Shakespeare and His Sonnets [DVD]

Rupert Graves , Tom Sturridge , John McKay    Exempt   DVD
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
Price: 12.45
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by watsonsinc.
Looking for Bargains?
Check out the DVD & Blu-ray Deals of the Week page to find this week's price-drops. Deals of the Week end on Sunday at 23:59.

LOVEFiLM By Post


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Find all the best television shows from the other side of the pond in our US TV store and catch the latest shows in our 2014's Hottest TV page.


Frequently Bought Together

A Waste of Shame: The Mystery of Shakespeare and His Sonnets  [DVD] + Anonymous [DVD] [2011]
Price For Both: 16.23

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together
  • Anonymous [DVD] [2011] 3.78

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Rupert Graves, Tom Sturridge, Indira Varma, Zoe Wanamaker, Anna Chancellor
  • Directors: John McKay
  • Format: PAL, Colour
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Exempt
  • Studio: Demand
  • DVD Release Date: 22 Jun 2009
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001TLWR8C
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 41,848 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

An intense drama about the passionate and destructive love triangle that consumed Shakespere in his troubled middle years adapting some of the most celebrated, sexual, raw, and vitriolic love poems ever written.

Shakespeare's Sonnets are the most compelling source for an emotional and dramatic journey into the psychology of the man himself. Self-analytical, brutally honest, they allow us to go behind the scenes of this complex genius they are his story told in his own words. Behind the lyrical, beautifully crafted language, a brooding obsession with the 'Lovely Boy' and Shakespeare's extra-marital relationship with a Dark Lady is revealed. The sonnet sequence is his unique meditation on love, sex, mortality and the creative urge, which has tantalised scholars and casual readers alike.

Product Description

An intense drama about the passionate and destructive love triangle that consumed Shakespere in his troubled middle years adapting some of the most celebrated, sexual, raw, and vitriolic love poems ever written. Shakespeare's Sonnets are the most compelling source for an emotional and dramatic journey into the psychology of the man himself. Self-analytical, brutally honest, they allow us to go behind the scenes of this complex genius they are his story told in his own words. Behind the lyrical, beautifully crafted language, a brooding obsession with the 'Lovely Boy' and Shakespeare's extra-marital relationship with a Dark Lady is revealed. The sonnet sequence is his unique meditation on love, sex, mortality and the creative urge, which has tantalised scholars and casual readers alike.


Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
4.1 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
From the known facts of Shakespeare's life, scholarly theories and his own imagination, screenwriter and novelist William Boyd has fashioned a fine speculative drama about the creation of the Sonnets. He does this by projecting the poems' subject matter back onto the lives of two historical figures - William Shakespeare ("Will S.") and William Herbert, future Earl of Pembroke ("Will H.") - and an invented one, a Frenchwoman named Lucie (the "Dark Lady"). Yet the film is best viewed not as a "solution" to "The Mystery of Shakespeare and his Sonnets" (as the subtitle puts it) but as a fictional story focused on universal themes of love, lust, disease and mortality, and on the relationship between personal experience and artistic creativity. And while there is plenty of wit and humor, the choice of title - from Sonnet 129: "Th'expense of spirit in a waste of shame / Is lust in action..." - underlines the fundamental moral seriousness of the project.
"A Waste of Shame" is more an intimate chamber piece for three actors than a period spectacle or costume drama like "Shakespeare in Love." Fortunately, it's been cast from strength. Rupert Graves is a wonderful Will S., suggesting in many subtle ways the complex character of the "country boy" who has learned the proper way to act (in all senses of the word) in order to further his career in London. He reads (in voiceover) the fragments from the Sonnets that punctuate the film's progress beautifully, yet several of the most memorable moments are silent, allowing us to sense Will's emotions from Graves's highly expressive face. Even among his many excellent performances of the past few years - including "God on Trial," "The Waiting Room," "To Be First" and "Clapham Junction" - this is a stand-out. Tom Sturridge as Will H.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "The expense of spirit ..." 15 May 2010
By Nicholas Casley TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
"The expense of spirit in a waste of shame is lust in action; and till action lust is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame." The quote is from sonnet 129.

This 2005 BBC production was made in association with the Open University. It was a TV film that attempted to solve the mysteries of the identities of those referred to by Shakespeare in his sonnets: the fair youth and the dark lady. Despite being made for TV, it has high production values and could well have had a cinema release. (The only faux pas that I could discern was the neat and tidy brickwork of some of the houses.)

The story begins in 1596 with the death in Stratford of Shakespeare's only son, Hamnet, and ends in 1609 when the playwright hands over his manuscript of sonnets to his publisher and discusses the dedication. The story considers that the fair youth is William Herbert, "a very Adonis himself" according to his mother (played by Zoe Wanamaker), and "the master-mistress of my passion" according to Shakespeare, played convincingly by Rupert Graves. Herbert is played well by the long-legged and beautiful Tom Sturridge with a knowing smile; the dark lady is supposed to be Lucie, "a Moorish half-breed" who is French and a doxey. She is played by Indira Varma. The twist is that both of Shakespeare's loves - the fair youth and the dark lady - are themselves emotionally entwined.

I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the proposed identifications - the screenwriter is written by William Boyd - but the production is very down-to-earth compared with Hollywood's rendering of Shakespeare's life, and the film is all the better for that. (Fancy a mercury bath to cure your pox?) Much of the filming was done at Knole in Kent, which can be confusing for those who know it as the house stands in for a number of different settings. The film has a very good soundtrack by Kevin Sargent.

Alas, there are no extras.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Bard as Leopold Bloom 8 Nov 2011
Format:DVD
William Boyd has written some wonderful books and screenplays. I am a bit confused about his intention here. Is he trying to say that the Bard was so disturbed by the death of his son Hamnet that he transferred his affections to William Herbert? In a purely platonic way? Does he see something of the delicate Hamnet in Herbert's feminine good looks? Boyd is walking on eggshells here. He has to play around with the traditional chronology and compress events considerably to have both the young man and the dark lady of the sonnets arrive in Shakespeare's life on practically the same day. Of course, nobody knows for sure what happened, or even if the story told in the sonnets is autobiographical, so Boyd has a perfect right to postulate what he will. But I am disappointed with his treatment. He seems to have thought he was rewriting "Ulysses," with Shakespeare as Leopold Bloom. Here was an opportunity to speculate about the great loves of Shakespeare's life, and Boyd reduces one to a son-surrogate and the other to a working mom. And poor Anne Hathaway is a henpecking shrew. The daughters play no role in this drama. It's also interesting that Boyd exalts Shakespeare to the position of poet-in-residence with the King's Men, without explaining that he also took a hand in the troop's business and acted important roles in his own and others' plays, all the while he was becoming a wealthy landowner in Stratford. This might go a ways toward explaining why the playwright didn't return to live with his family until he was ready to retire. In the film, Boyd would have you believe that everybody he knew was trying to get their favorite cash cow to leave London and effectively retire from the stage. Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback